US and China trade talks to resume in October.

pile of intermodal containers

Photo by Frans Van Heerden on Pexels.com

The office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) confirmed on Thursday that a deputy-level meeting would be held in mid-September to discuss plans for trade talks in October.
This past Sunday, new tariffs on US$125 billion of Chinese imports, including shoes and smartwatches, came into effect after President Trump said he was disappointed in China’s lack of effort to buy US farm goods. In return, China responded with duties on $75 billion of American goods, affecting crude oil exported from the US.
The agreed to talks in October will hopefully resolve the 13-month trade war between the two countries.
If you have any questions how your company may be impacted by the US/China trade war – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Japan downgrades South Korea’s trade status.

black and white mountain over yellow white and blue sky

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

This past Wednesday, Japan downgraded South Korea’s preferential trade status – requiring Japanese manufacturers to now apply for approval for technology-related goods to be exported to South Korea. Japan claims the trade status of South Korea was needed over concerns the technology could be used for military purposes. Prior to Wednesday, exports to South Korea required less compliance as a preferential trade partner. South Korea also announced their action to downgrade Japan’s trade status to take effect later this month (September).

As previously posted on this blog, South Korea accuses Japan using trade as retaliation in responses to court decision granting compensation to individuals who were victims of forced labor during Japan’s occupation of Korea. The AP reports leadership from both countries are working on an agreement.

Citizens from both countries have also joined in street protests and boycotting goods from either country.

USTR to open comment period on List 4.

birds eye view photo of freight containers

Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com

This past Thursday, the US Trade Representative (USTR) gave formal notice of the plan to raise tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese imports from 10% to 15% starting December 15th. The formal notice starts the opportunity for importers or anyone impacted by the potential tariffs to submit comments. The comments are an opportunity for businesses to tell the White House why the tariffs are good or bad. As in the past, comments have been both supportive and critical of the potential tariffs.
This round of tariffs encompasses goods on “List 4” and includes mostly consumer goods – such as smartphones, computers, and other consumer electronics.
If you want to submit comments regarding any goods on “List 4”, contact experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Trump delays List 4 tariffs until December 14th.

cargo crane harbor harbour

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The Trump administration has postponed the levying of 10% tariffs on List 4 goods covering $300 billion in imports from China until December 15th. The initial date of September 1st was postponed after reports of a phone call with Beijing.

A new round of trade talks will be held in September after this month’s talks did not result in a trade deal.

There is still time to lower your import risk, if you would like solutions to lowering the duties you need to pay, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US Companies can no longer do business with Huawei on August 19th.

In May, the Trump administration placed Huawei on the BIS entity list – a list of foreign organizations with whom U.S. companies are restricted from doing business with due to national security concerns. The Trump administration believes the Chinese government has influence over Huawei and that certain Huawei equipment and technology may allow the Chinese government to spy using the Huawei equipment – especially the planned 5G equipment Huawei has developed.

Even though Huawei is on the BIS entity list, the Trump administration issued a 90-day exemption to the ban, allowing U.S. companies to sell certain products and services to Huawei. However, this 90-day exemption will end on Monday, August 19th.

It is unknown whether the U.S. government will issued another extension. Given the current situation in Hong Kong and the lack of progress on US/China trade talks, the Trump administration will likely not grant another extension.

Will post any additional Huawei news as it becomes available. If you have any questions or concerns about whether your business can continue business with Huawei, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

US collected $63 billion in tariffs through June.

cargo crane harbor harbour

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Treasury department’s tariffs is expected to generate almost $72 billion in tariffs through June of this year. This number will likely go much higher if the “List 4” duties take effect on September 1st. On September 1st, over $300 billion in Chinese goods will be subject to a 10% tariff with a potential to increase to 25%.

Specifically, as of June 30th, the Treasury department has collected $63 billion in tariffs over the past 12 months. In contrast, prior to the trade war, the US only brought in $30 billion dollars.

The WSJ estimates the annual generated amount can be as high as $100 billion by the end of the year once the 10% duties are placed on over $300 billion worth of imported goods from China.

If you have any questions how the current 301 duties or proposed List 4 duties will impact you, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China currency move believed to be in response to tariff threat.

stock exchange board

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

According to the Washington Post, China let the exchange rate for the yuan to fall below seven per dollar. A weak Chinese currency has the effect of increasing the country’s exports, hurting foreign competitors.

The WP further quotes People’s Bank of China blaming the decline on “trade protectionism,” a reference to the ongoing trade dispute between the US and China. The remainder of the article lists the various markets world wide and the subsequent decline since China’s announcement.

As previously blogged, China will take other measures in response to the trade war besides imposing their own duties on US imports. China has currently imposed duties covering 110 billion US goods, and can only impose an additional duty on $50 billion before China covers all of the $160 billion in US goods last year.

 

China no longer top trading partner with the US.

silhouette of buildings

Photo by Saunak Shah on Pexels.com

Due to the ongoing trade war, China is no longer the largest trading partner with the US, having been replaced with the US’ neighbors to the north and south – Canada and Mexico. For the first half of 2019, imports from China to the US dropped by 12 percent and US exports to China fell by 19 percent. The current duties on Chinese goods (301 duties) covers 3 lists of goods and covers over $250 billion worth of imports. Trump has proposed an additional List 4 duties covering all remaining imports from China, a duty that will cover over $300 billion in goods from China.

This is the first time since 2005 that China has trailed behind Mexico as a US trading partner and the first time since 2015 to 2018 that China has not been the top US trading partner.

China threatens retaliation if tariffs are imposed on September 1st.

birds eye view photo of freight containers

Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com

According to the Associated Press, earlier today, China threatened the US with retaliation if Trump goes through with his threat to impose sanctions on “List 4” of goods from China on September 1st.

The primary issues of disagreement between the US and China are the forced technology transfers that are required by US companies doing business in China in addition to the lack of intellectual property protections for companies doing business in China. Additionally, the US has also expressed concerns over China’s 2025.

At the current time, the US has imposed tariffs over $250 billion in Chinese imports while the China has imposed tariffs on over $110 billion in US goods. The proposed September 1st tariffs cover over $300 billion in goods – effectively covering all imports of goods from China. The US government may have an upper hand as China only imported about $160 billion in US goods – a number that highlights the unequal trade balance ($160 billion versus $550 billion).

It will be interesting to see how China retaliates, they can only threaten to impose an additional $50 billion in tariffs on US goods, only 1/6th of the what the US can impose.

Trump threatens tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese imports on September 1st.

Donald_Trump_official_portrait

Official portrait of President Donald J. Trump, Friday, October 6, 2017. (Official White House photo by Shealah Craighead)

As you are aware, yesterday, President Trump imposed a September 1st deadline for an additional $300 billion in tariffs on Chinese goods if a trade deal is not reached.

The $300 billion covers the remaining items not previously listed in Lists 1, 2 or 3. The List 3 exclusion process is currently underway and Commerce recently published lists of additional exclusion requests that have been granted in Lists 1 and 2.

Here is a summary of what has been reported by various news outlets:

  1. There has been no progress in trade talks with China this week in Shanghai between Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and their Chinese counterparts.
  2. Trump believes China is moving too slow in working on a deal and set September 1st as a deadline to impose duties on the remaining imports of goods from China.
  3. The new duties if imposed in September will be at 10%. We have seen goods in List 1, 2, 3 have tariffs as high as 25%.
  4. Some news outlets report that China may be stalling to sign a trade deal until after the 2020 election.
  5. September 1st would mark an end to a “truce” between the two countries.
  6. China has threatened to respond with their own retaliatory tariffs if Trump goes through with the September 1st deadline.
  7. Trump claims China has not gone through with their promise to buy more agricultural products from the US in large quantities.
  8. Trump also claims China would curtail the shipments of Fentanyl to the United States, but has not and the shipments continue to harm Americans.
  9. According to reports, Chinese negotiators want Trump to remove the tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods before they will purchase US agricultural goods and comply with their other concessions.
  10. Trump believes the US economy is strong as unemployment has hit a 50-year low, a position that will enable the US to outlast China in the event of a prolonged trade war.
  11. Analysts claim further duties will only hurt Americans in increasing the prices of goods.
  12. Shipping companies and importers are trying to get as many shipments into the US prior to the September 1st deadline.

Will post more news as they become available. If you have any questions how the 301 duties will impact your business, contact David Hsu at: dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com or by phone/text at 832-896-6288.