Trump delays List 4 tariffs until December 14th.

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The Trump administration has postponed the levying of 10% tariffs on List 4 goods covering $300 billion in imports from China until December 15th. The initial date of September 1st was postponed after reports of a phone call with Beijing.

A new round of trade talks will be held in September after this month’s talks did not result in a trade deal.

There is still time to lower your import risk, if you would like solutions to lowering the duties you need to pay, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China currency move believed to be in response to tariff threat.

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According to the Washington Post, China let the exchange rate for the yuan to fall below seven per dollar. A weak Chinese currency has the effect of increasing the country’s exports, hurting foreign competitors.

The WP further quotes People’s Bank of China blaming the decline on “trade protectionism,” a reference to the ongoing trade dispute between the US and China. The remainder of the article lists the various markets world wide and the subsequent decline since China’s announcement.

As previously blogged, China will take other measures in response to the trade war besides imposing their own duties on US imports. China has currently imposed duties covering 110 billion US goods, and can only impose an additional duty on $50 billion before China covers all of the $160 billion in US goods last year.

 

China’s industrial profits fall in June, sparking fears of slowdown.

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According to CNBC, profits earned by China’s industrial firms fell 3.1% in June from a year earlier, according to the China’s National Bureau of Statistics.

The decrease in industrial profits is likely due to the US/China trade war and the increase in tariffs on Chinese imports. CNBC also states that economic growth in the second quarter slowed to a near 30-year low.

With the US and China set to meet on July 30th for the first time since May, both sides may be looking for an agreement to end the almost year-long trade war.

Apple shifts Mac Pro production to China, then asks to not pay tariffs on imported Mac Pros.

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The Mac Pro was the last Apple product manufactured in the US, and last June, Apple announced they would shift Mac Pro production to China.

On July 18th, Apple filed “exclusion requests” with the US Trade Representative to exclude certain items from the 25% 301 duties on goods imported from China.

The parts include a CPU, heat sink, power supplies, USB charging cables, circuit boards, graphics processing modules, computer enclosure, the Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad.

To view Apple’s exclusion requests, go here: https://exclusions.ustr.gov/s/PublicDocket and search by “Organization Name” for “Apple”.

If you want to file an exclusion request, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Preliminary Duties On Chinese Solar Cells.

pexels-photo-356049.jpegIn a notice posted on the Federal Register here, the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has preliminarily found that “Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules, From the People’s Republic of China”, will be subject to preliminary countervailing duties.

Commerce determined that countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of crystalline silicon photoltaic cells, whether or not assembled into modules (solar cells) from the People’s Republic of China (China).

The scope of the order covers crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, and modules, laminates, and panels, consisting of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, whether or not partially or fully assembled into other products, including, but not limited to, modules, laminates, panels, and building integrated materials.

The two mandatory respondents and their respective subsidy rates include Canadian Solar Inc. and its Cross-Owned Affiliates - 13.72% and Changzhou Trina Solar Energy Co., Ltd. and its Cross-Owned Affiliates - 10.93%. Non-selected companies under review have a subsidy rate of 12.64%

If you or someone you know imports crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells from China and they have questions about how this order affects them, please call David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.