CBP seizes unreported currency from South Korea.

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Image of seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized $11,097 in reported currency from a passenger who arrived from South Korea to Washington Dulles International airport.

According to the media release, the passenger reported she was carrying $500. As usual, CBP officers will explain the reporting requirements. After explaining the requirements to her, she changed her declaration to $6,000. The media release doesn’t mention it – but she likely filled out the FinCen 105 form.

And as usual, after you sign the FinCen 105 form, CBP will search everything – in this instance, CBP discovered $11,097 in her baggage. CBP seized all her currency and did not give her any back for humanitarian reasons.

The reason she did not get anything back was likely because she was arriving home – CBP usually gives some money back for humanitarian reasons if the traveler is going out of the country.

If CBP has seized your currency, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com or phone/text to: 832-896-6288.

Customs seizes more undeclared currency from travelers.

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CBP currency detector dog Cato, source: CBP.gov

According to a Customs media release, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized unreported currency from several travelers at Washington Dulles International Airport.

In the first seizure, a CBP currency detector dog Cato (pictured above) alerted CBP to baggage owned by a couple from Turkey. When stopped by Customs, the travelers declared they had $5,000. Upon a subsequent search, CBP discovered $20,654 in currency. CBP returned $654 in humanitarian relief and seized the remainder.

In the second seizure, CBP officers inspected a couple bound for Ghana who reported they possessed $36,000 in writing and verbally. A subsequent examination discovered $40,781 in their possession. Like above, CBP released $781 in humanitarian relief while seizing the remaining balance.

As previously discussed on my blog, you can carry large amounts of money, and those who are carrying $10,000 or more must report all of the amount to Customs.

If you are ever asked to declare how much you are carrying, if you do not know the exact amount, be sure to declare more than you are carrying. Also, be sure to include all your family members or everyone you are traveling with in the final calculation.

If you or someone you know has had their currency seized by Customs, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com and dh@gjatradeaw.com.

$715k in US currency seized from bus entering the US from Mexico.

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According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, officers in Hidalgo intercepted $715,010 in unreported U.S. currency in a commercial bus attempting to enter into Mexico on September 24th.

The officers were conducting an outbound operation at the Hidalgo-Reynosa International Bridge and stopped the bus for further inspection. Officers used an imaging system and found 32 packages containing US currency hidden in the bus.

The hidden currency was seized by CBP and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) were involved.

In general, if HSI is involved, CBP believes the currency is the proceeds or will be used for illegal activities.

If you have had your currency seized by CBP, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu for immediate assistance. Phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes $17k from Jamaica-bound Traveler.

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Photo by Negative Space on Pexels.com

According to a Customs media release, CBP officers in Philadelphia seized $16,542 in unreported currency from a traveler heading to Jamaica.

Upon initial questioning, the traveler indicated to CBP officials he was carrying $6,000. CBP then explained to him the reporting requirements and the traveler indicated in writing he was carrying $8,000. Upon secondary inspection, CBP found $16,542 in the traveler’s carry-on bag.

What do you do if Customs asks how much you are carrying?
Be truthful and tell them how much you are carrying, even if it exceeds the $10,000.

Do I sign the form they present to me?
Sometimes CBP will ask you to sign a form indicating how much money you are carrying – fill out that form truthfully and declare all the money you are carrying.

I’m traveling with my family, do I include the currency they are carrying?
Yes, count the currency of everyone traveling in your party (your kids, spouse, parents, in-laws, friends, etc).

They seized my currency, what do I do?
Contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288. I’m available 24/7 by phone or text. Or email me anytime at my personal email: attorney.dave@yahoo.com or my work email: dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

Help! CBP seized our cash even though each of us only carried $6,000.

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We often hear from our clients that Customs seized their cash even though they were carrying less than $10,000. The typical scenario is a couple traveling overseas. The husband is carrying $6,000 in cash and the wife carries another $6,000 in cash. To most people, this appears to not violate the $10,000 reporting rule, right?

Unfortunately, it’s wrong. In the eyes of Customs, this is “structuring”. Structuring is when a person has divided more than $10,000 upon import or export of money or equivalent to avoid reporting. The law against structuring is found under 31 USC Section 5316.

We all know air travel is stressful, but next time, be sure to just report all the currency you have with you over $10,000. The cash is not taxed and reporting the money will ultimately save you time and stress. Cash seizures at airports will take several hours and you will more than likely miss your flight, or your connecting flight and the important events you have planned at your destination.

It is important to note that structuring still applies even if it is done over several days, weeks or months and structuring still applies regardless of the form of the money (whether it is in cash, travelers checks, or other monetary instruments).

So what are the penalties for currency seizures?
There are both civil and criminal penalties for structuring currency, it all depends on the circumstances of the seizure. The money can be seized, forfeited, and you may be  fined, or face additional criminal penalties if there is a pattern of illegal activity over a year long period.

Additionally, once you are in the Customs database and have a record for one currency seizure, each entry and exit to and from the US may result in heightened scrutiny from CBP.

NEED HELP?
If you or someone you know has faced a currency seizure for structuring or a cash seizure for failure to declare, contact experienced money seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

 

CBP seizes $110,000 in money from travelers going to Taiwan.

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According to a CBP Public Affairs release on December 12, 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston (IAH) seized over $110,000 USD from a couple flying from Houston (IAH) to Taipei (TPE).

International travelers leaving or entering the US can carry an unlimited amount of money must report any currency (checks, cash, money orders, etc.) in any denomination (USD, Euro, Yen, RMB, NTD, etc.) over $10,000.

The travelers subject of the December 12th press release reported $50,000 to CBP but a subsequent search resulted in a total finding of $110,204. The money was seized by CBP and the travelers departed to Taiwan.

The press release also indicates that CBP seizes approximately $289,609 in undeclared or illicit currency each day at the various air, land, and sea ports of entry into the United States.

If you or anyone you know has had money seized at any airport, border crossing or seaport while entering or leaving the US, contact David Hsu at 713.932.1540 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com for a free consultation.