Taiwan seeks entry into CPTPP

Ship Exiting Harbor - Tony Tan

Credit: Tony Tan

As reported by the Central News Agency in Taiwan – Taiwan’s President, Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) said she hopes Japan will support Taiwan’s admission into the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). Since the US’s withdrawal, Japan has led the trade initiative and President Tsai hopes the strengthening ties between the two nations will help Taiwan enter the CPTPP.
Part of this recent push could be related to the recent loss of two of Taiwan’s diplomatic allies – Pacific island nations of Kiribati and the Soloman Islands. The loss of these two allies is the result of a pressure campaign by China and reduces Taiwan’s diplomatic allies from 17 to 15.

Canada’s Global Affairs consults whether South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and the UK should join CPTPP.

The Global Affairs Canada organization includes individuals, businesses (including SMBs), industry associations, experts, consultants, academics, civil society organization, labour unions, governments, indigenous groups, students and youth and other interested Canadian stakeholders.

In late July, Global Affairs Canada started discussions whether South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and the United Kingdom should join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (“CPTPP”).

An announcement was published in the Canada Gazette, Part 1. Global Affairs Canada has has begun soliciting comments for whether these countries (and China) should join the CPTPP. The deadline for submissions is midnight, August 25, 2019.

The announcement asks for the following information:

1. Contributor’s name and address and, if applicable, the name of the contributor’s organization, institution or business;
2. The specific issues being addressed; and
3. Where possible, precise information on the rationale for the positions taken, including any significant impact it may have on Canada’s domestic or international interests.

Additionally, they would like feedback on specific markets that Canadians and businesses would support entry to the CPTPP.

The full text of the announcement and additional topics Global Affairs Canada would like feedback on can be found here:

http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2019/2019-07-27/html/notice-avis-eng.html#nL5

 

American economist warns Taiwan not to take sides in US-China trade war.

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According to Taiwan News online, American economist Tyler Cowen said on Monday (July 8) that Taiwan cannot afford to take sides in the U.S.-China trade war, reported Central News Agency.

The publication Business Today (今周刊) invited Tyler Cowen for a panel discussion in Taiwan in which Cowen argued Taiwan may be a loser in the trade dispute between the US and China if they chooe which of the two biggest economic powers to support.

According to Cowen, Taiwan is in a catch-22 situation, Cowen states: “Taiwan is close to China, has made massive investments, and high-income manpower flows into China. On the other hand, China’s increased military deployments in the South China Sea should be a clear sign that China’s intentions are not friendly”.

According to Taiwan News, Tyler Cowen is an economics professor at George Mason University and serves as general director of George Mason’s Mercatus Center, a university research center that focuses on the market economy.

If you have any questions or would like to learn how to save on duties during the current US/China trade war, contact experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Taiwan to cut tariffs on sake and Japan farm and fishery products as it looks to join TPP.

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According to the Japan Times, in an effort to join the Trans-Pacific Partnership multilateral free trade pact (formerly the Trans-Pacific Partnership), Taiwan will lower its tariffs on Japanese sake from 40% to 20% along with reductions in tariffs for Japanese farm and fishery products. The reduction in tariffs is to demonstrate Taiwan’s commitment for free trade.

While open to free trade, Taiwan still does not allow imports from five Japanese prefectures impacted by the Fukushima nuclear power station crisis that occurred in 2011.

Will post any updates if and when Taiwan is admitted to the TPP.

Taiwan – beneficiary of the US-China trade war.

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According to the Taipei Times, a beneficiary of the US-China trade war may be Taiwan. With tariffs of 10-25% on goods from China, some of Taiwan’s tech companies are exploring options of moving back to Taiwan – specifically the city of Taoyuan. Taoyuan is half an hour south of Taiwan and home to the Taoyuan International Aiport (Chiang Kai-Shek (CKS) Airport).

Several Taiwanese companies such as iPhone assembler Pegatron, laptop maker Compal Electronics and Apple supplier Inventec are adding capacity in Taoyuan. Even Quanta Computer is back in Taiwan seeking factory land.

30 years ago, Pegatron, Compal, Inventec and Quanta along with countless other Taiwanese companies moved to China due to lower production costs. In fact, 15 of the top 20 exporters from China to the US in 2016 initially originated from Taiwan.

If you have any questions how the 232 or 301 duties may impact your business, contact experienced trade law attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com

U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan.

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Image of denier polyester staple fiber courtesy of the Tianjin Glory Tang Technology Co., Ltd.

According to a U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) news release – the Commerce Department announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan.

Commerce determined that exporters from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan sold fine denier polyester staple fiber in the United States at less than fair value. The dumping margins determined by Commerce are as follows:

China – 65.17 – 103.06 percent
India – 21.43 percent
Korea – 0 – 45.23 percent
Taiwan – 0 – 48.86 percent

With today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan based on the final rates, as appropriate.

I find it ironic, one of the petitioners is Nan Ya Plastics Corporation, America – a company that previously imported fine denier polyester staple fiber.

One interested statistic in the Commerce release – the Trump administration has 114 new antidumping and countervailing duty investigations since the beginning of the administration compared to the the 64 initiations in the last 489 days of the previous administration.

If you are an importer of fine denier polyster staple fiber from China, India, Korea or Taiwan and have questions how this decision may impact your business, contact David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.