CBP seizes more than $650k worth of fake Apple AirPods.

Image of seized counterfeit AirPod, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the LA/Long Beach seaport (one of the top 4 busiest US ports) seized over 2,400 pairs of counterfeit wireless earphones along with 14,220 charging cables. CBP estimates the value of the seized goods, if authentic to be worth $651,780. The goods were seized for violating Apple’s airpod and lightning registered trademarks (see image of a sample of the actual AirPods and cables seized).

If you have had your shipment seized for suspicion of violating trademarks, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com to discuss your options.

Half million dollars worth of counterfeit designer bags seized.

Counterfeit seized bags, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Kentucky seized four packages containing more than 200 counterfeit designer bags. After the bags were first detained, Customs sent samples of the bags to import specialists who determined the bags were counterfeit.

According to Customs, 204 “Louis Vuitton” bags were seized and if real, the value of the bags would have been around $583,440. Interested thing about this seizure was the origin of these goods – Dubai, UAE instead of the usual Hong Kong or Shenzhen, China.

If you have had your goods seized and you received a seizure notice – contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 to discuss your options. Or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit championship sports rings seized.

Seized counterfeit rings.

In early August, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer seized a package containing 62 counterfeit championship rings in Chicago. The shipment from Shanghai China was destined for a store in Aurora.

CBP officers detained and examined the rings before sending them to an import specialist to verify authenticity. Customs noted the poor quality, poor packaging, low declared value and typical security features found on licensed merchandise.

Customs seized the goods, that if authentic, would have been valued at more than $93,600.

Author’s note – while this shipment was destined to go to a store address, my guess is the purchaser of these items was likely a collector searching for a novelty item to collect – instead of buying the rings to re sell to unsuspecting buyers. Championship rings are well documented and easy to verify authenticity. Also, a buyer of these rings would want to know the history of the prior owner and authenticity can be verified by any jeweler. Highly doubt a real collector would be fooled by these cheap knockoffs.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$115k counterfeit luxury goods seized by Customs.

Image of counterfeit goods, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Kentucky seized a shipment of counterfeit goods valued at more than $115,000. The shipment contained counterfeit goods from brands such as Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Chanel, Tory Burch, Tiffany and Michael Kors.

Besides counterfeit goods, the shipments also contained counterfeit make-up, electronics and shoes. The shipment from Hong Kong was destined for an address in Texas.

If your goods have been detained or seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit shoes seized in LAX.

Counterfeit Nike, source: CBP.gov

Another day, another seizure by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in LAX. The counterfeit shoes were from Hong Kong and labeled as “plastic ornaments”. Upon further examination, CBP officers found and seized 1,755 pairs of shoes with the Nike and Adidas branding.

Image of seized “Nike Air” shoes, source: cbp.gov

Customs then worked with import specialists at the Apparel, Footwear & Textiles Center of Excellence and Expertise (Apparel Center) to verify authenticity. As 100% of the time that occurs – the shoes were determined to be counterfeit and seized by Customs. CBP valued the seizure, if authentic, at $207,000.

If you have had your good seized by Customs, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Image of counterfeit Adidas – source: CBP.gov

$500k of e-cigarettes seized by CBP.

Seized counterfeit pods, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Philadelphia seized 48 shipments of either counterfeit or unapproved e-cigarette pods since June with the 58,538 individual pods worth a combined $500,000 if authentic or if approved for sale.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the importation of tobacco products imported into the US and all products must comply with the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) along with the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

This past April, in response to the increase rise in teenage tobacco usage, the FDA issued new measures to regulate the unauthorized importation of flavored cartridge e-cigarettes. Besides unauthorized goods, the seized products also included counterfeit of brand names such as Pop, Puff, Eonsmoke, etc.

If you have had your good seized by Customs on behalf of the FDA, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Unauthorized COVID medicine seized.

COVID-19 treatment bills – source: CBP.gov

Since July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers in Seattle have seized 8 shipments totaling over 2,400 pills of unauthorized influenza treatments for COVID-19. Working with the FDA, CBP prevents unauthorized medicines that may mislead consumers by falsely claiming to treat or prevent diseases.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs and want to explore your options contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit fireplaces seized by Customs.

Counterfeit fireplace; source: CBP.gov

In late July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Minnesota inspected a rail container for Seattle and seized 15,015 fireplaces for violating intellectual property rights (IPR). CBP estimates the value of the seizure of $523,784 if the fireplaces were genuine.

CBP did not specify which brand of fireplaces were copied and the image supplied by CBP (above) does not specify the name brand.

If you have had your goods seized by CBP, there may be some options available – contact David Hsu by phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

More counterfeit seizures – “Dior X Air Jordan 1”.

Image of seized shoes, source: CBP.gov

Another busy day for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers working in Dallas where they seized a shipment of counterfeit footwear (Nike basketball shoes) that are reported by CBP to retail for $2,000 per pair. Customs described the shoes as the “Dior X Air Jordan 1” shoes ultimately destined for Mexico. Besides Nike, the shipment also contained shoes featuring registered trademarks by Adidas.

The entire shipment contained over 1,800 pairs of shoes in 60 boxes from Hong Kong and labeled as “Ball Golf”. CBP estimates the seizure is valued at over $4.3 million dollars.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Customs seizes fake watches valued at nearly $2 million.

Image of seized watches, source: CBP.gov


U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Ohio seized 54 counterfeit watches from two packages shipped from China – and according to CBP, if authentic would total over $1.9 million.

According to Customs, the fake watches were replicas of luxury brands such as: Audemar Piguet, Rolex, Cartier, and Gucci. The watches were manifested as “timers and “watch” with a declared value of $33 and $200.

Author’s note – usually Customs will detain suspected counterfeit goods and then verify the authenticity of the watches. Authenticity usually occurs by sending photos or samples to the property rights holder. 100% of the time the property rights holder will say the goods are counterfeit. During this period of time, there is nothing for the importer to do, except wait to receive notice the goods will be seized. A “Notice of Seizure” will be sent to the address where the watches were to be sent – after you receive a Notice of Seizure, be sure to mark the date of the letter. You will have 30 days to respond to a seizure notice.

If you have received a seizure notice and want to discuss your options – call David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.