$1.1 million in counterfeit goods seized in Kentucky.

Counterfeit goods seized, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Louisville seized five shipments containing counterfeit goods, if authentic would be worth more than $1.1 million.

On that day, CBP seized multiple shipments, with 5 separate shipments containing: 30 “Louis Vuitton” toes, 4 “Dior” handbags, 2 “Gucci” handbags, 200 “YSL” purses and another 366 “LV” bags. The last shipment contained a box with Louis Vuitton wallets.

When Customs detains goods for suspicion of counterfeit goods, CBP will submit photos or send samples to the trademark or other intellectual property rights holder. Almost 100% of the time the trademark holder will notify Customs the importer of record does not have a right to import the covered goods. If so, then Customs will seize the goods and send a “Notice of Sezizure” to the importer of record.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, call David Hsu or text anytime at 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit batons seized by Customs.

Seized batons, source: CBP.gov

Instead of the usual counterfeit bags, belts and wallets – last week U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers Cincinnati seized over 800 counterfeit batons. The batons were counterfeits of batons and packaged as batons from companies “511 Tactical” and “Armament Systems and Procedures (ASP)” goods.

The batons were manufactured in Shenzhen, China and described as “selfie sticks” and “window breakers”. Customs claims the batons also contained accessories as spear tips.

Author’s note – while not mentioned in the media release, the next step is for Customs to issue a seizure notice to the importer of record, giving the importer an opportunity to petition Customs to release the goods.

Also, in addition to seizing the batons for being counterfeit, CBP likely seized the goods for being mislabeled on the entry paperwork as “selfie sticks” and “window breakers”.

If you have received a seizure notice, or have had your goods seized, contact attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com to discuss your options.

CBP seizes $1.41 million in eyewear.

Counterfeit glasses, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Chicago seized seven shipments containing eyewear worth more than $1.41 million. The glasses were entered duty free claiming country of origin as Israel. However, upon further inspection, CBP officials found the origin markings on the eyeglasses did not match the country of origin on the paperwork.

CBP reports the country of origin on the goods included China, France, Italy and the United States. CBP seized the goods for fraudulently misrepresenting the country of origin and attempting to avoid the payment of duties. CBP seized the goods for violation of 19 USC 1304 and 19 USC 1595a(c).

If you have had your goods seized by customs for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$5.5 million in fake Gucci, Instagram and Facebook clothing seized.

Seized goods, source: CBP.gov

Earlier this past July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at one of our great nation’s biggest seaport of Los Angeles / Long Beach seized a large shipment of women’s sleepwear containing counterfeit brands such as Gucci, Facebook and Instagram.

2020 is a weird year indeed when we consider Facebook and Instagram to be a luxury brand. If authentic the 16,340 items of seized counterfeit pajamas (called “sleeping dresses”) would be worth an approximate retail value of $5.5 million.

CBP reported the counterfeit goods were concealed inside generic non-branded pajamas which CBP believes was intentionally packaged to avoid detection.

Author’s note – yes, in general if you pack counterfeit goods underneath unbranded goods, or try to conceal a counterfeit logo (such as using black tape to cover a logo), CBP will assume you are aware of the nature of the goods and are attempting to smuggle them into the US in violation of 19 USC 1595a (c)(1)(A), in other words merchandise that “is stolen, smuggled, or clandestinely imported or introduced“.

In addition to violating intellectual property rights of the trademark holder, CBP also claims counterfeit goods may not be in compliance with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) requirements for flammability standards of sleepwear.

If you have had your shipment seized for alleged counterfeit violations or seized for alleged violations of CPSC consumer guidelines – contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit Super Bowl rings seized by CBP.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers in Kentucky seized over 150 counterfeit Super Bowl championship rings arriving from China. It wasn’t mentioned in the article, but the seizure in Kentucky means it was likely shipped by DHL.

The shipment contained rings from various professional sports organizations such as the NFL, NBA, MLB and NHL. If authentic, the rings would have an MSRP of $43,450. As the rings likely were not licnsed by the team or organization, they were seized for Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) violations.

For suspected counterfeit goods, CBP will send an image to the property right holder – if the rights holder says the goods are not authentic, then Customs will seize the goods.

If you have had your good seized by Customs or have received a Notice of Seizure, contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu anytime by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit Juul pods seized by CBP.

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– Image of counterfeit Juul pods, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers at the port of St. Louis seized 2,379 counterfeit Juul pods. The counterfeit Juul pods were shipped from Hong Kong to an address in Missouri. If authentic, the approximate value of the seized pods were approximately $38,040.

Due to the recent media attention of vaping deaths, the United States Food and Drug Administration (and through CBP) is very concerned about harmful products that may cause illnesses and death to people who vape.

One other giveaway is the importation of Juul pods, as Juul pods are produced in the US according to US government standards.

If you have had your goods seized, and want to discuss your options. Contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by cell/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes +$2 million in counterfeit goods from China.

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Counterfeit goods seized by CBP, source: cbp.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Washington Dulles airport seized fake goods from China with a MSRP of $2 million destined to Flushing, New York.

The air cargo shipment contained 2,601 coin purses, 459 purses, and backpacks with counterfeit logos of luxury brand names such as Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Chanel.

When CBP seizes suspected counterfeit goods, they send samples and photos to the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) for verification with the trademark holders.

The goods were determined to be counterfeit (no trademark holder has ever agreed that a product was not counterfeit), and if authentic, would have an MSRP of $2,244,370.

If you have had your shipment seized by CBP on suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for assistance, we can explore your options. If you have received a penalty notice for violation of intellectual property rights, give us a call or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Man pleads guilty in multi-million dollar counterfeit cellphone scheme.

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Photo by Tyler Lastovich on Pexels.com

According to CBS 2 news in Boise, Idaho – a man in Boise pleased guilty to trafficking in counterfeit cellphones and accessories. Artur Pupko, age 28, pleaded guilty to selling counterfeit cellphones and cellphone accessories on Amazon and eBay.
According to court documents, Pupko would buy bulk products from China, then repackage the products and claiming them as new and genuine. Pupko may face up to 10 years in prison and a $5 million dollar fine. Sentencing will occur on December 17, 2019.
If you have had your goods seized by Customs and are facing criminal or civil penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by text/call at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes prohibited fertilizer from Mexico.

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Bottle of seized fertilizer, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Baltimore along with agriculture specialists detained two travelers from California carrying a bottle of what was declared as “organic liquid fertilizer” containing soil, compost, ashes and cattle manure.
As soil may contain invasive pests and other items such as weed seeds and fungal and bacterial diseases, US agriculture specialists tested the fertilizer. Since cattle manure poses an agriculture threat for cattle diseases, it is not allowed entry into the US unless an import permit and certificate the manure was properly treated.
If you have had a customs or CBP seizure and want your items back, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit HD action cameras.

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Image of the seized shipment, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers at the Dallas Fort Worth port of entry seized 4,000 counterfeit high definition cameras for intellectual property rights (IPR) violations. The MSRP of these cameras totaled $241,076.

The 4,000 high definition cameras were shipped in 220 boxes to an address in Carrollton. The shipment from Hong Kong was inspected and CBP officers believed the merchandise to be counterfeit due to poor quality packaging and shipping not normal for the genuine merchandise.

CBP’s Import Specialist Division confirmed the items were counterfeit with the company’s trademark holder.

What happens after something is seized by Customs? 
CBP will issue a Notice of Seizure (seizure notice). The seizure notice will indicate the item seized, the value of the shipment and the options available to the importer of record.

Time is of the essence in responding to Customs so an answer or other action must be taken immediately.

What happens if you do nothing after you receive notice from Customs?
If nothing is done within 30 days from the notice of seizure date, CBP will begin forfeiture and ultimately will destroy the seized items.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.