CBP agriculture specialists intercept moth egg mass.

Mass of egg moths, source: CBP.gov

Brownsville U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers intercept egg masses belonging to the Euproctis sp. (Erebidae) moth – a “first in port” of this pest. When initially discovered in late July, CBP agriculture specialists were unaware of the species and submitted a sample to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for identification.

The Euproctis sp. (Erebidae) months are found in Europe and Asia, it is believed the caterpillars are serious pests to agricultural crops and forests.

If your vessel has been seized by Customs or if you receive a notice of action for pests found on your shipment, contact invasive pests attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Invasive snails seized from arriving cargo.

Image of invasive snails, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists at the Houston Seaport discovered snails known as: Xeropicta krynickii and Monacha cf. syriaca. The snails are an invasive species of pests that can damage crops and are likely to harm US food and natural resources.

The vessel arrived from Israel and CBP found the snails on the interior and exterior of military vehicles being transported within the vessel. Amazing work by Customs agriculture specialists as these snails are only millimeters long and can hide in small crevices for long periods of time.

If your vessel is being detained by CBP for containing invasive pests, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com immediately to start discussing your options.

Argentine Moth and Asian Gypy Moth eggs found on multiple vessels.

AGM egg masses, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists confirmed samples of various egg masses seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) did in fact contain the first instance in the US of the Argentine moth egg species.

The egg masses were found on the M/V Star Kinn and was the first time the Argentine moth species was found to be in the United States. The other egg masses of the Asian gypsy moth (AGM) were found on a shipping container of aluminum billets from India.

Asian Gypsy Moths (AGM) are one of the most destructive insect pests in the world. AGM are not known to occur in the United States. AGM are highly mobile and can travel 25 miles per day while laying eggs that yield hundreds of caterpillars with big appetites. To make matters worse, the AGM are not selective and attack over 500 different types of trees and plants.

If you receive a Notice of Action from CBP or from the Port with a notification that invasive species, or pests have been found on wooden pallets, wooden packaging material or eggs and larvae found in various parts of the shipment – contact experienced wood packaging material attorney David Hsu by phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP intercepts termites from entering the US.

Image of lumber from Cameroon, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers intercepted a shipment of lumber from Cameroon containing termites. The pests were found around the stacks of lumber for entry into the US. When CBP finds invasive pests or larvae of potentially invasive species, a sample is collected and submitted to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for further analysis and confirmation.

The container with the lumber was sealed and secured while USDA evaluates the sample pest, ultimately determining the termites as Kalotermitidae species, or commonly known as the dry worm termites. These termites are known to damage timber used as a structure and hardwood floors in the home.

If you have your shipment seized by Customs due to the presence of an invasive species -whether the wood-boring wasp or a dry worm termite – contact David Hsu immediately to discuss your options. Depending on the type of pest, there may be some cost effective options instead of re-exporting back to the origination. Call/text anytime to 832-896-6288 or email David at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Image of termite, source: CBP.gov

Invasive and destructive beetle larvae seized by Customs.

Image of the intercepted khapra beetle larvae, source: CBP.gov

According to a US Customs media release, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists intercepted beetle larvae found on a shipment of welding wire from China. The larvae were sent to the US Department of Agriculture for testing and identification and identified as Trogoderma granarium Everts or the commonly known Khapra beetle. As a result of identification, the shipment was sealed to prevent potential contamination with other shipments.

According to CBP, Khapra beetles are dangerous pests that pose a risk to grain and other stored seeds. The Khapra beetle is usually located in burlap bags, corrugated carboard boxes and animal hides. Originally from India, Khapra beetles are found in shipments from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Asia and some parts of Europe.

If you have received a notice of action or if Customs has found a pest in your import – time is of the essence – contact attorney David Hsu for immediate assistance – phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP Agriculture Specialists intercept several invasive pests.

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Photo by Brent Keane on Pexels.com

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agriculture Specialists (CBPAS) in Portal found mission grass on wood packing material from Vietnam. This weed is an invasive species that spreads by seed and native to tropical Africa. Mission grass is usually used for cattle feed, but can invated cultivated fields and overtake crops.

Besides mission grass, CBPAS in Portal also found several boring beetle trails carved into the wood on one of the pallets holding cargo. Following the trails resulted in finding four live wood boring beetle larvae. CBPAS later identified the larva as longhorn beetles. Longhorn beetles are invasive species that harm the timber industry, wildlife habitats and urban landscapes.

Lastly in Minneosa, CBPAS officers found the exoskeletons of larval khapra beetles. Khapra beetles have larval covered in fine hairs that contaminate the products they infest. Khapra beetles also are difficult to remove – they live up to 7 years without food and are resistant to insecticides.

If you have had your shipment seized for invasive species, contact David Hsu by phone/text for a no-cost or obligation consultation at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Invasive Gypsy Moth Eggs stopped by CBP.

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Image of the seized gypsy moth eggs, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP agriculture specialists found Japanese gypsy moth eggs on ocean freighters.

The eggs were found aboard the “Royal Hope” freighter and were removed by the ship’s crew and CBP agriculture specialists. The affected areas with the eggs were also sprayed by CBP with a pest spray oil.

These Japanese gypsy moth eggs are part of the overall Asian Gypsy Moth that damages trees and plants due to their big appetites. Additionally, the gypsy moth females are very mobile and travel up to 25 miles per day and can also lay egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars.

Fortunately, there are no known infestations of the asian gypsy moth.

In the media release, CBP said the “Royal Hope” freighter from Ghent, Belgium was to pick up coal for export and prior to leaving Belgium, the royal Hope made a port call in Japan where they removed adult moths and egg masses prior to issuing a certificate clearing the vessel to depart.

If you or someone you know has received a notice from customs for suspected pests such as the asian gympsy moth (or any other invasive pest), contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP inspects agriculture shipments for pests and diseases.

christmas tree with decors under the staircase

Photo by Jonathan Borba on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, Agriculture Specialist have inspected thousands of fresh cut Christmas trees, which are imported from Canada since last October continuing all the way to December. Puerto Rico has the longest Christmas holiday celebration in the World and trees are imported from November into mid-January.

Christmas Tree shipments to Puerto Rico were inspected by the US Department of Agriculture, which may require them be treated to remove harmful insects, diseases or pest that can spread and contaminate other trees or crops.

Some of the invasive species identified by CBP Agricultural Specialists have determined to be invasive pests include: Altica sp. (Chrysomelidae), Aphalara cathae (Linnaeus), Arion sp. (Arionidae), Caloptilla sp. (Gracillariidae), Cepaea sp. (Helicidae), Cinara sp. (Aphididae), Deroceras reticulatum (Muller), Galerucini Hylobius sp. (Curculionidae), Hylobius sp. (Curculionidae), Insecta Otiohynchus singularia (Linnaeus), Paria sp. (Chrysomelidae), Pubillia sp. (Membracidae), Pyrrharctia Isabella (Erebidae), and Xyleborus sp. (Curculionidae).

If your shipment has been seized by customs for containing invasive pests or if you have had a wood packaging/pest issue – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP intercepts invasive “almond bug” from Italy.

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Image of the “almond bug”, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, Agriculture Specialist canine alerted CBP officers to a passenger’s bag arriving from from Italy. The Agriculture Specialists inspected the item and found prohibited plant items such as pomegranates. Examination of the pomegranates led to the discovery of an insect that was then sent to the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) for identification. The insect was identified as the Monosteira unicostata, or “Almond bug.”

This species of pest poses a serious risk to the $5.3 billion California almond industry. These bugs are typically found in almond trees in the Mediterranean region.

If you have had your shipment seized due to invasive species or had a shipment seized due to invasive pests located in or among wooden packaging materials – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu to explore options – call/text 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP intercepts insects hiding in pumpkin shipment.

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Image of the longhorn beetle larvae, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers and agriculture specialists at the Port of Wilmington, Delaware inspected a shipment of pumpkins from Costa Rica.

During inspection, CBP agriculture specialists found the flower longhorn beetle larvae in wood packaging material. The larvae were sent to the to the U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist and was identified as belonging in the subfamily Lepturinae, or flower longhorn beetles.

According to CBP: “The adult beetles are considered pollinators, but while in their larvae stage they bore beneath a tree’s bark, potentially damage healthy trees.

The importer chose to re-export the pumpkins and wood packaging material instead of destroying the shipment.”

If you have had a shipment seized by CBP due to wood packaging materials (WPM) containing suspected invasive species of pests such as the wood boring wasp or this longhorn beetle – contact experienced wood packaging materials attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.