CBP finds rare first-in-nation pest in importation of corn.

cratosomus2

A specimen of Cratosomus punctulatus
Gyllenhal
, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Brownsville, Texas intercepted a rare “First in Nation” pest in a shipment of corn.  The interception of the pest occurred at the Los Indios International Bridge import lot in a shipment of fresh corn from Mexico.
When the corn was inspected, CBP officers found the pest and submitted it to a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist. The initial identification was later confirmed by a national specialist as Cratosomus punctulatus Gyllenhal (Curculionidae) a pest not known to occur in the United States and intercepted for the first time in the nation.
This is a type of snout weevil that are plant feeders and many weeevils are pests of agricultural crops and forests.
If you have had your shipment seized due to pests or other invasive species, there may be some alternatives besides the ones given to you by Customs – contact experienced wood packing material and pest seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes hatching eggs shipped from the Netherlands.

HatchingEggs

Image of hatching eggs, source: cbp media release.

Earlier this month U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the international mail facility in Miami seized 30 suspected hatching eggs. The shipment from the Netherlands is the third shipment intercepted with hatching eggs.

The shipment label identified the shipment as “Children’s Toys”, however an x-ray performed found 30 hatching eggs. Shipment of eggs is allowed, but do require an import permit. The eggs were seized due to the risk they may carry the Exotic Newcastle Disease.

If you have questions about your imports or want to be sure you have the right permits to import, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Delaware CBP reports 2 insect discovery firsts.

Ozodes multituberculatus

Ozodes multituberculatus. source: USDA photo.

CBP agriculture specialists along with the USDA confirmed the first arrival of two insects at the Wilmington, Delaware port.

In early June, CBP agriculture specialists found an long-horned beetle, an invasive species int he US as they bore into wood and can cause extensive damage to trees. The following week, CBP agriculture specialists discovered an adult weevil in pineapples from Guatemala – the weevils post a threat to our domestic grains and crops.

In the event pests are found, the common CBP protocol is to re-export and fumigate the shipment.

If you have had a shipment or container seized due to the presence of pests such as the weevil, beetle or wood boring wasp or other insect, contact experienced fumigation attorney David Hsu by phone/email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP reports first encounter with Rosy Gypsy Moth from transport ship in Baltimore.

shallow focus photography of black ship

Photo by Sascha Hormel on Pexels.com

CBP issued a press release yesterday reporting the first encounter of the Rosy Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) (species: Lymantri mathura). CBP with the U.S. Department of Agriculture discovered the moth aboard a ship in Baltimore and suspect the destructive pest may have been due to a June part call in Japan (a high risk AGM area).

The USDA says the AGM is a threat to forests and urban landscapes as the moth can travel up to 25 miles per day and lay egg masses which yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars. The hungry hungry caterpillars are said to be voracious eaters that attack more than 500 species of trees and plants.

If CBP Agriculture Specialists have detained your vessel at a port and there are issues of whether to turn the ship around or fumigate – call experienced attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.