CBP seizes $90,000 in counterfeit goods from Hong Kong.

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Image of seized goods. Source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers seized two shipments of counterfeit products arriving at Pittsburgh International Airport.

The first shipment’s manifest indicated the package contained men’s casual shoes. Upon inspection, CBP found a Rolex watch, LV bracelet, Christian Loubouton shoes, par of Amiri jeans, Gucci jacket and a LV sweatshirt. If authentic, the merchandise would have a manufacturer suggested retail price of $90,798.

In the second shipment, the packing list indicated phones cases – but instead contained designer brand charms and jewelry.

As is the case in most counterfeit seizures, poor quality of items and lack of authentic packaging were common indications of counterfeit merchandise.

CEE?
In all counterfeit seizure cases, CBP typically sends the counterfeited items to the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEE for short). The CEE center is sort of a misnomer, as the CEE offices are located throughout the US and not in a centralized location. The CEE center then verifies the authenticity of the goods with the trademark holders. In all cases, the trademark holder will claim the seized goods are counterfeit.

So what happens after a seizure?
The importer of record (person who will receive the package) will receive a seizure notice by certified mail, return receipt requested. The importer of recorder can then either abandon the items, file a petition, offer in compromise or refer to court action.

If you have had a shipment seized by Customs for alleged counterfeit violations or if you have received a notice of seizure, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Undeclared currency seized by traveler to Lebanon.

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Photo by Craig Adderley on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, a passenger traveling to Lebanon had her undeclared currency seized at Philadelphia International Airport.

CBP officers approached the traveler and informed her of the currency reporting requirements. After explaining the requirements they asked the traveler how much money she was carrying. She replied $10,000 and upon subsequent examination or her belongings, CBP officers seized a total of $15,000.

Customs released $300 to her for “humanitarian purposes” and released her.

As you are aware, all currency over $10,000 needs to be declared. The currency is not taxed nor taken, but only has to be reported. People traveling in the same party are subject to the $10,000 limit as a party and not individually. The humanitarian relief is a discretionary amount and is not always given to the travelers.

If you have had a  currency seizure at the airport or any of the 400+ ports of entry to the US, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei received approximately $75 billion in support from…

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Photo by Alex Fu on Pexels.com

According to a Wall Street Journal article published on Christmas day, Huawei reportedly had “access to as much as $75 billion in state support”. The $75 million figure was a result of the WSJ accounting of public records of Huawei and includes $46 billion in loans and $25 billion in tax cuts.
This recent article from the WSJ may bolster the US government’s case for barring mobile hardware made by Huawei to be used by government agencies. The US government may also cite this argument in it’s appeal to other countries to avoid using Huawei telecommunications equipment when municipalities choose a 5G equipment provider.
Huawei has denied any ties to the Chinese government and Huawei is still subject to a ban on using US origin hardware and software.
If you have any questions on how the Huawei band will impact your business, or if you have concerns about your export compliance with the current ban on Huawei – contact experienced trade and compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Customs agents in Puerto Rico seize counterfeit goods valued over $5.3 million.

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Images of seized goods in Puerto Rico, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, agents in Puerto Rico seized over 289 shipments of counterfeit goods destined for addresses in Puerto Rico.

A composite photo of a sampling of seized goods include counterfeit LV, Gucci, Apple and Supreme. If authentic, Customs valued the shipments of seized goods totaling over $5.3 million. Other seized goods include watches, jewelry, bags, clothing and sunglasses featuring brands such as Hublot, Pandora, Nike, and Rolex.

If you or someone you know has received a notice of seizure for counterfeit goods, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Customs seizes $21,000 in unreported currency.

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Image of seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized $21,255 in unreported currency from traveler headed to Pakistan departing from Washington Dulles International Airport.

The passenger was headed to Pakistan through Turkey and was stopped for further inspection prior to boarding the plane. The traveler reported she had $6,000 and also told Customs officials she understood the currency reporting requirements.

Most of the time, Customs will make a traveler sign the FinCen 105 form before conducting a more detailed inspection.

After the traveler declared she had $6,000, a subsequent search by officers revealed she was carrying a combined $21,255. Customs returned her $255 for “humanitarian purposes” and seized $21,000 for violation of currency reporting requirements.

Depending on the amount seized, Customs may or may not return some money to the traveler for “humanitarian purposes” and the amount is discretionary.

Customs may or may not issue civil and criminal penalties for violation US currency requirements – in this instance, HSI was not involved so I do not believe Customs will pursue any criminal penalties.

If you have had your hard-earned currency seized by Customs, call experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com. There are certain deadlines that must be met to ensure your seized currency is not forfeited.

Customs seizes $25,000 in unreported currency.

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Photo by David McBee on Pexels.com

According to a Customs media release, CBP officers at Dulles International Airport seized $25,151 in unreported currency from a U.S. couple traveling to Accra, Ghana.

As you are aware, all travelers must report all currency more than $10,000 to a CBP officer when entering or leaving the country. 

Here are the other currency reporting requirements:

-There is no limit how much money you can bring into or out of the US.

-However, if you or people you are traveling with have more than $10,000 in currency or negotiable monetary instruments, you must fill out a “Report of International Transportation of Currency and Monetary Instruments” FinCEN 105 (former CF 4790).

-If you are traveling with a family, then count everyone, everyone in your traveling party.

-You can obtain a FinCen 105 form before traveling or when going through CBP. If you have questions, CBP officers can assist you.

Do you have a question about the CBP currency reporting requirements? Contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes 20,000 counterfeit Oral-B brush heads from China.

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Image of seized counterfeit brush heads, source: CBP.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized 20,400 counterfeit Oral-B toothbrush. CBP officers noticed the poor packaging and lack of quality control while branded with the Oral-B brand name.

As is the case with all suspected counterfeit goods, the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise verified with Oral-B the goods were not authentic. Customs estimated if authentic, the seized goods have an MSRP of $95,600.

CBP claims the counterfeit goods “pose a serious health threat to consumers, as do all counterfeit healthcare products. Counterfeit brush heads are manufactured in unsanitary facilities with substandard materials that may sicken users or cause bleeding to a user’s gums or mouth, and structural defects may cause the brush head to detach and potentially choke users.”

This is one of the few instances where I believe the counterfeit goods should be avoided – definitely not worth buying the counterfeit goods as they risk harm to your dental health.

If you are caught importing counterfeit goods, you may be hit with a civil penalty at a later date – contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu immediately for help – 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Louisville CBP seizes over $95 million in counterfeit goods over 3 month period.

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Image of seized counterfeit watches, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release,  CBP officers in Louisville, Kentucky seized 164 shipments containing counterfeit goods with an estimated MSRP of $95 million. This figure represents an increase of 75% over the same period last year.

The seized items include counterfeit designer bags, jewelry, shoes, sunglasses and more. While CBP handles the seizures, CBP officers work along with the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centeres for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) to verify authenticity of trademarks. As a side note, I have never had a trademark holder agree that the goods were not counterfeit – I don’t believe any trademark holder will agree their goods are authentic.

The rest of the media release talks about why buying counterfeit goods are bad (poor quality control, maybe contains hazardous materials, funds criminal activity, etc.).

If you have had your good seized, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com. There may be something we can do to get your seized goods back.

CBP seize counterfeit Patriots, Astros and Yankees rings.

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Counterfeit Patriots Super Bowl Ring – source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers seized nine counterfeit Patriots Super Bowl rings and two other counterfeit championship rings for the Houston Astros and New York Yankees.

If authentic, the rings would carry a manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of $526,000. The shipment from China was described as a “box” with a value of $14.00.

After the shipment was detained, CBP and the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise verified the rings were counterfeit.

If you have had a shipment detained for counterfeit goods, you need to give us a call. Customs has and will send penalty notices and there may be some other options. Contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake airbags from China seized in Ontario, California.

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Image of seized airbag, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, officers at Ontario International Airport (ONT) express air cargo operations in Ontario, California along with the import specialists (IS) assigned to the Automotive & Aerospace Center of Excellence (AA Center) seized counterfeit Honda airbags arriving in packages from China.

Eight Honda airbags were arriving from China when CBP officers discovered the airbags during an examination of the express packages. The airbags were sent to import specialists who focused on automobile parts and confirmed the airbags were in violation of Honda’s  protected mark. If the airbags were genuine, they carried an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $4,856.

The remainder of the CBP article highlights the dangers of purchasing fake parts that may not function as well as OEM parts.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs for suspicion of counterfeit goods, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.