Counterfeit Bob Marley and the Joker pictures seized.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Area Port of Norfolk-Newport News, Va., seized counterfeit 3-D holographic Bob Marley and Joker pictures on July 19, 2022, that were destined to Louisville, Kentucky. (CBP Photo/Handout)
Images of seized 3-D of Bob Marley and the Joker. Source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers in Virginia seized counterfeit 3-D holographic pictures. The pictures contained images of Bob Marley and the Joker. The six Bob Marley photos and 80 Joker pictures arrived from China and were destined to an address in Kentucky.

CBP seized the shipment due to violations of trademarks for Bob Marley and the Joker. CBP’s Apparel, Footwear and Textiles CEE evaluated the shipment and the CEE trade experts seized the shipment for trademark violations.

Have you had your goods seized by CBP? Contact David Hsu 24/7 by phone/text: 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP Seizes Counterfeit Beats Earphones.

Image of seized “Beats” earphones, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in New York seized a shipment of counterfeit Beats brand earphones. The July shipment was selected and examined by CBP. Officers found the earphones packed in zip lock bags and bearing a strong resemblance to Beats “Tour” earphones.

CBP suspected the earphones to be counterfeit due to the lack of labels, invoices, and packaging. As with all counterfeit goods, a sample was submitted to the Electronics Center of Excellence and Expertise where it was determined the items were counterfeit and violated the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) of the Beats brand holder. If authentic, the seized shipment were worth a MSRP of $25,000.

Counterfeit Sports Memorabilia and Paraphernalia Seized by US Customs.

Counterfeit championship ring, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, in mid-July CBP officers in Indianapolis and Louisville seized 178 counterfeit championship rings and 171 counterfeit professional sports jerseys that, if genuine would have a combined MSRP of $288,350.

The seized items including a Championship rings featuring baseball teams such as the Atlanta Braves, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals and basketball teams such as the Boston Celtics and even collegiate teams from the University of Georgia.

The seized shipments all originated in China and were destined to various addresses in the US. CBP recognized the goods as counterfeit due to the poor quality of materials, poor printing and shipping the goods to residential addresses.

The remainder of the CBP media release highlighted the dangers of buying counterfeit goods and the belief counterfeit merchandise funds organized crime.

While I am sure counterfeit goods does fund organized crime, I believe the people who buy commercial quantities of counterfeit Championship rings are aware the rings are not authentic and purchase these for collecting, and not to re-sell as authentic.

If you or someone you know have had their goods seized for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact David Hsu at anytime by phone/text or email: attorney.dave@yahoo.com or 832-896-6288.

Counterfeit diabetic socks seized by CBP.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Virginia seized nearly 120,000 pairs of counterfeit socks frequently purchased by diabetic patients. The MSRP, if authentic, totals over $1.8 million. CBP verified whether the Hugh Ugoli branded cotton socks from Turkey contained the “Seal of Cotton” trademark. CBP officers verified the shipment with CBP’s Apparel, Footwear and Textiles Centers of Excellence and Expertise, for a final authenticity determination and an appraisal. CBP’s trade exports found the entire shipment was counterfeit for violating the “Seal of Cotton” trademark.

In general, products with the Seal of Cotton trademark, owned and licensed exclusively by Cotton Incorporated, are evaluated based on the cotton content in their product. Licensees of the “Seal of Cotton” must have all artwork and packaging bearing the “Seal of Cotton” trademark approved prior to manufacturing and distribution.

If you have had your shipment seized by CBP for violating the “Seal of Cotton” or other trademarks such as the iPhone, Android, USB, HDMI or any other trademark logo – contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$4+ Million in Counterfeit Jewelry Seized by Customs

Seized Richard Mille watch, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Louisville seized three packages from various shippers containing watches, bracelets, earrings, rings and necklaces that appear to be counterfeit.

They didn’t specify which air mail service, but Louisville is a major hub for DHL, UPS and FedEx flights from overseas.

The first shipment from Hong Kong were headed to Canada and contained watches bearing luxury marks such as Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Hublot among others. If authentic, the goods were valued at approximately $1.1 million.

The second seizure were composed of two packages and contained counterfeit jewelry – Tommy Hilfiger necklaces, Rolex bracelets, Gucci bracelets and rings and more. This shipment, also from Hong Kong, was headed to Miami. If real, the value of the seized goods totaled $1.19 million.

Lastly, the final parcel from the UAE contained a single Richard Mille watch with an MSRP of $2.25 million if authentic.

Typically, import specialists will detain shipments to verify with the trademark holder if the goods are authentic. From the media release, it appears Customs, in this instance, already pre-determined the goods were counterfeit. In general, Customs will seize any luxury branded good from Hong Kong that is poorly packaged and manufactured with poor quality. Most likely, the importer of record for all these shipments will receive a “Notice of Seizure” in a few weeks with a 30-day deadline (from the time of the seizure) to resolve the seizure. After 30-days, the goods are forfeited and a potential civil penalty will be issued to the importer of record.

If you have received a notice of seizure or have your goods detained, contact David Hsu by phone direct/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com; DH@GJATradeLaw.com.

CBP seizes $46,000 in cash from airport traveler.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.
Image of seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at Dulles airport seized about $46,628 in unreported currency from a man traveling to Cameroon. The random inspection occurred on outbound passengers on a flight to Brussels. CBP officers asked the individual how much money he was carrying – the traveler told Customs he had $30,000 and completed and signed a U.S. Treasury Department form (FINCEN 105).

Upon further inspection, CBP officers found a total of $46,628.00 and seized the entire amount. As you are aware, there is no limit how much cash you are bringing into or out of the US, the only requirement is for travelers to report currency $10,000 or greater.

According to the media release, the traveler “was not criminally charged”. This means CBP did not involve Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). If CBP brings involves HSI, then they believe your currency is related to criminal activity and you may need criminal counsel in addition to customs counsel.

If you have had your hard earned money seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.
CBP seized $46,628 in unreported
currency from Cameroon-bound man.
Source: CBP.gov

$57 million in designer watches seized by Customs.

Counterfeit watches, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Louisville, Kentucky seized a shipment last Saturday of 32 separate shipments containing counterfeit designer watches valued at $57.84 million dollars, if authentic. Some of the counterfeits were branded Rolex and Richard Mille.

The 32 separate shipments contained 2,168 watches that were determined to be counterfeit by CBP’s experts at the various CEE departments. The watches were from Hong Kong where approximately 25% of the counterfeit goods seized originate.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288; or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com for assistance.

More Counterfeit COVID Vaccination Cards Seized.

Image of counterfeit COVID-19 vaccination card; source: CBP.gov

Back in late August I reported on the seizure of hundreds of COVID vaccination cards. And last week, CBP officers in Chicago reported seizing more COVID-19 vaccination cards. CBP was alerted to the counterfeit nature of the cards due to the poor quality of the card stock and misspelled words (not sure why the counterfeiters double check the spelling)?

The shipment was headed to an address in Ohio and is just one of the high volume of counterfeit vaccination cards being shipped into the US.

The basis for the shipment seizures are due to the unauthorized use of the Health and Human Services of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seal.

If you have had your shipment detained or seized by Customs, call David Hsu by phone or text: 832-896-6288 to discuss your options at no cost. Emails can also be sent to: attorney.dave@yahoo.com

Counterfeit COVID vaccination cards seized.

Fake COVID vaccination cards, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Memphis, Tennessee seized a shipment from China containing counterfeit COVID-19 vaccination cards. The shipment from Shenzhen was labeled as “PAPER CARD, PAPER” and CBP officers knew the inside contents as this was the 15th shipment for the night.

CBP knew the cards were counterfeit because of typos, incomplete words and the Spanish translation was incorrect. You are probably thinking why the counterfeiters didn’t simply photocopy an actual vaccination card posted on social media. I don’t know why either.

CBP has so far seized 3,017 vaccination cards in over 121 shipments. Fake vaccination cards are illegal under 18 USC Section 1017.

If you have had your shipment seized (except counterfeit vaccination cards) by Customs, contact David Hsu by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or phone/text 832-896-6288.

Counterfeit auto parts seized by CBP.

Seized shipment of counterfeit auto parts; source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Philadelphia seized counterfeit Chinese vehicle parts in June consisting of door locks, hinges, powered mirrors, steering wheel switches, headlights and taillights, grills, rear bumpers, and paint kits. As the goods from China were branded with “Mercedes-Benz”, CBP officers suspected the goods may have been counterfeit. CBP Officers confirmed with the trademark holder and seized the goods for being counterfeit. The estimated retail value of the goods, if authentic totals $295,052.

If your shipment of goods from China has been detained or seized for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com 24/7 for immediate assistance.