CBP seizes $46,000 in cash from airport traveler.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.
Image of seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at Dulles airport seized about $46,628 in unreported currency from a man traveling to Cameroon. The random inspection occurred on outbound passengers on a flight to Brussels. CBP officers asked the individual how much money he was carrying – the traveler told Customs he had $30,000 and completed and signed a U.S. Treasury Department form (FINCEN 105).

Upon further inspection, CBP officers found a total of $46,628.00 and seized the entire amount. As you are aware, there is no limit how much cash you are bringing into or out of the US, the only requirement is for travelers to report currency $10,000 or greater.

According to the media release, the traveler “was not criminally charged”. This means CBP did not involve Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). If CBP brings involves HSI, then they believe your currency is related to criminal activity and you may need criminal counsel in addition to customs counsel.

If you have had your hard earned money seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.
CBP seized $46,628 in unreported
currency from Cameroon-bound man.
Source: CBP.gov

FCC opens comment period regarding Huawei and ZTE’s risk to national security.

black satellite tower under blue skies

Photo by Sparsh Karki on Pexels.com

In November of last year, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued a Report and Order preventing US service providers from using the Federal government’s $8.5 billion Universal Service Fund (USF) to buy telecommunications equipment and services from Chinese companies that may pose national security risks to the US. The Report and Order specifically names two Chinese-based companies: Huawei and ZTE.

Last week, the FCC opened a comment period to allow public comments about their initial determination that Huawei and ZTE pose a risk to national security. Comments are due on February 3rd and after the comment period, the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau will release a public notice with their final decision.

In response to the FCC’s November Report and Order, Huawei filed a lawsuit in December in the US 5th Circuit claiming the order is unlawful and the FCC lacks authority to make national security designations.

If you would like to file a comment, please contact experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Homeland Security records largest counterfeit seizure ever – $500 million.

chanel paris eua de parfum bottle

Photo by Jess Watters on Pexels.com

A little bit of background – Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) is a component of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). ICE is a federal agency under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and responsible for enforcing over 400 federal statutes within the United States.

Last Thursday (August 16th, 2018) was the culmination of a six year investigation into the importation and sale of fake luxury goods – ending with HSI officials reported seizing enough counterfeit luxury bags and belts to fill 22 shipping containers and the arrest of 33 people, all of Chinese descent.

HSI reported the seized goods included popular luxury brands “including Gucci, Tory Burch, Hermes, Coach, Burberry, Michael Kors and Louis Vuitton” along with knockoff Chanel perfume.

With an estimated loss in retail value of nearly $500 million, this seizure is the largest counterfeit seizure in history, besting the 2012 seizure of $325 million worth of fake goods.

If you have had problems with CBP seizing goods due to alleged counterfeit or trademark violations, call experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.