Potential changes to the Foreign Direct Product Rule may hinder Huawei supply chain.

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The Trump administration has agreed to changes to the Foreign Direct Product Rule, which subjects some foreign-made goods based on U.S. technology or software to comply with U.S. regulations.  The proposed rule change requires foreign companies that use U.S. chip making equipment to obtain a license before they can supply certain semiconductor chips to Huawei.

The proposed rule change is to limit the number of foreign suppliers who continue to supply chips to Huawei. The new rule will greatly impact Huawei as most chip manufacturers use equipment produc Multiple articles on this subject cite the Taiwan-based “Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company” (TSMC). TSMC is Taiwan’s largest semiconductor manufacturer with over 15 fabs located throughout Taiwan.

If you have any questions whether you are subject to export controls or if you want to know how you are impacted, contact experienced export controls attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US investigating Chinese telecom giant ZTE for alleged bribery.

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While the news is dominated by the corona virus coverage, the US is investigating whether ZTE paid bribes to foreign officials to gain advantage in ZTE’s operations. ZTE is one of the largest Chinese telecommunications companies and are believed to be closely related to the Chinese Communist Party.

The bribes include allegations of bribery by ZTE in over 12 countries, including but not limited to Algeria, Liberia, Kenya and Zimbabwe.

These new legal issues come right after ZTE plead guilty 3 years ago for violating U.S. sanctions against Iran and North Korea. In 2017, ZTE plead guilty to violating U.S. sanctions, and resulted in ZTE paying a civil and criminal penalty and forfeiture of assets – a settlement costing ZTE over $1.19 billion dollars. ZTE’s probation ended

ZTE’s US headquarters are based in Richardson Texas with the company’s headquarters located in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.

Huawei’s latest license extension cut in half by US government, 45 instead of 90 days.

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Since May of 2019, Huawei has been placed on the US entity list and therefore unable to conduct business with US companies. However, the Trump administration did permit companies to do business with Huawei through license extensions.

The most recent 90-day extension was granted in November 2019, allowing companies to do business with Huawei until the expiration of 90 days.

Last week, an 45-day extension was granted. After 45 days, and if no further extensions are granted, then American companies can no longer do business with Huawei.

Contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text if you have any questions how the current prohibitions against Huawei and ZTE will impact your business. Email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Federal Court rules against Huawei.

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Yesterday, a federal judge in Texas ruled in favor of the United States, concluding Congress acted within its powers by including contract prohibitions against ZTE and Huawei in the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act.

Also earlier this week, the government also charged Huwei and a couple of their subsidiaries with federal racketeering and conspiracy (RICO) charges to steal trade secrets from US companies.

The recent decision stems from a Huawei lawsuit filed in March 2019, in which they claim Section 889 of the National Defense Authorization Act was unconstitutional because it limited Huawei’s business in the US. Huawei’s main argument was the NDAA overbroad in restricting sales to Huawei and violated Huawei’s due process.

Contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text if you have any questions how the current prohibitions against Huawei and ZTE will impact your business. Email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei’s Google maps alternative.

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As you are aware, Huawei’s inclusion on the US entity list means no access Android and the Google Play Store. As a result Huawei has been looking at alternative companies to replace the Google Maps application – and last week, found their replacement.

According to Reuters, Huawei reached a deal with Dutch mapping company, TomTom which will see TomTom providing Huawei access to their navigation, mapping and traffic information.

With the TomTom information, Huawei will create their own proprietary apps for their own Harmony Operating System.

If you have any questions how Huawei’s inclusion on the BIS entity list will impact your business or if you are in need of export compliance, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US lawmaker wants to ban US intelligence sharing with countries that use Huawei 5G.

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According to a Reuters article, U.S. Senator Tom Cotton introduced a bill last Wednesday that would stop the United States from sharing intelligence with countries that allow Huawei Technologies to operate 5G network technology.

The Sen. Cotton bill is just one of several legislative efforts against Huawei for potential national security concerns – last year Huawei was placed on the entity list.

The countries and companies that are considering Huawei’s 5G equipment include: Bahrain, Belgium, Britain Telecom, France, Hungary, Norway, Thailand and more.

The countries and companies that ban Huawei’s 5G equipment include: the United States, Australia, Facebook, Google, Japan, Microsoft, New Zealand, Softbank, Sophos, South Korea, University of Oxford, UAE, Verizon Communications and Vodafone.

If you have any questions about the Huawei ban, or want to ensure your exports are in compliance, contact experienced export attorney, David Hsu by phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

FCC opens comment period regarding Huawei and ZTE’s risk to national security.

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In November of last year, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued a Report and Order preventing US service providers from using the Federal government’s $8.5 billion Universal Service Fund (USF) to buy telecommunications equipment and services from Chinese companies that may pose national security risks to the US. The Report and Order specifically names two Chinese-based companies: Huawei and ZTE.

Last week, the FCC opened a comment period to allow public comments about their initial determination that Huawei and ZTE pose a risk to national security. Comments are due on February 3rd and after the comment period, the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau will release a public notice with their final decision.

In response to the FCC’s November Report and Order, Huawei filed a lawsuit in December in the US 5th Circuit claiming the order is unlawful and the FCC lacks authority to make national security designations.

If you would like to file a comment, please contact experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei received approximately $75 billion in support from…

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According to a Wall Street Journal article published on Christmas day, Huawei reportedly had “access to as much as $75 billion in state support”. The $75 million figure was a result of the WSJ accounting of public records of Huawei and includes $46 billion in loans and $25 billion in tax cuts.
This recent article from the WSJ may bolster the US government’s case for barring mobile hardware made by Huawei to be used by government agencies. The US government may also cite this argument in it’s appeal to other countries to avoid using Huawei telecommunications equipment when municipalities choose a 5G equipment provider.
Huawei has denied any ties to the Chinese government and Huawei is still subject to a ban on using US origin hardware and software.
If you have any questions on how the Huawei band will impact your business, or if you have concerns about your export compliance with the current ban on Huawei – contact experienced trade and compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei shipping phones made without US components.

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As a result of the current export ban on US companies to do business with China’s Huawei, Huawei’s latest flagship (the Mate 30) is now shipping without US parts.

According to arstechnica.com, the new Mate 30 includes flash memory from Samsung (Korea) or Japan’s Toshiba and chips from US based Skyhook and Qorvo have been replaced by Huawei’s own HiSilicon versions.

As the article mentions, while sourcing non-US hardware isn’t a problem for Huawei, the biggest problem is software and app support. Huawei cannot use Google apps or Google’s Play store for users to download apps. As a result, popular apps like Netflix, Facebook, Twitter, Uber, Lyft and Amazon are not found on the Mate 30 phones.

In addition to including Huawei on the sanction list, the White House may consider putting Huawei on the Treasury Department’s “Specially Designated Nationals” (SDN) list, effectively prohibiting Huawei from the US banking system.

If you have any questions about the Huawei export ban, or are interested in updating your company’s compliance program to become compliant with the multiple landmines that occur when exporting, contact experienced trade compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei 5G technology coming to the US?

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As Huawei is on the US Commerce Department’s Entity List, Huawei is prevented from doing business with US companies without permission (ie without a license from BIS).
However, media outlets report that Huawei is discussing licensing of their 5G technology to unnamed American companies who have shown interest in long term and one-time transfers. Even a license to an American company may be a violation even if no goods exchange hands.
The Huawei inclusion on the entity list is part of an effort to prevent suspected Chinese government surveillance onto their communications equipment.
If you or your company is interested in doing any business with Huawei – contact experienced BIS/trade compliance attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.