US Treasury Secretary Mnunchin may travel to Beijing for trade talks.

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77th United States Treasury Secretary, Steven Mnuchin

Earlier this week, current US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told reporters he may travel to Beijing for trade negotiations to ease U.S.-China tensions.

In recent weeks both countries have announced tariffs on goods imported from the other country and the tensions between the US and China (the world’s two largest trading partners) has raised concerns of an impending trade war. The US first proposed tariffs totaling $150 billion on Chinese imports and Beijing has proposed tariffs on American goods such as soybeans.

In response, the Ministry of Commerce, People’s Republic of China would “welcome” the move by Treasury Secretary Mnuchin.

More updates as they become available.

Does President Trump want the US to become the 12th TPP member?

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According to a Daily Caller website article published today, President Trump asked Ambassador Robert Lighthizer and National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow to look into rejoining the trans-pacific partnership. The Daily Caller cites Senators Ben Sasse and Pat Roberts as the source of the news.

Sasse noted that Trump “deputized” Kudlow to “go get it done” and explore the possibility of rejoining TPP as the 12th party now that the other 11 nations have struck a deal. “It might be easier for us to join now, as opposed to long process,” he elaborated.

No other details are mentioned in the article but updates will be posted they are available.

China files WTO complaint over U.S. tariff actions.

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According to a World Trade Organization (WTO) report, the Chinese have requested a consultation with the United States under the WTO’s Dispute Settlement process about recent US tariff measures on Chinese goods.

Specifically, China claims the tariffs would be above the US bound rates of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). A request for consultation begins the dispute process in the WTO. After a consultation has been requested, the parties have an opportunity to discuss the matter and find a solution without litigation. If a solution is not reached between the two parties after 60 days, China may then request a panel to adjudicate the matter.

For more information, contact trade and customs attorney David Hsu, 832-896-6288, dhsu@givensjohnston.com.