Fake airbags from China seized in Ontario, California.

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Image of seized airbag, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, officers at Ontario International Airport (ONT) express air cargo operations in Ontario, California along with the import specialists (IS) assigned to the Automotive & Aerospace Center of Excellence (AA Center) seized counterfeit Honda airbags arriving in packages from China.

Eight Honda airbags were arriving from China when CBP officers discovered the airbags during an examination of the express packages. The airbags were sent to import specialists who focused on automobile parts and confirmed the airbags were in violation of Honda’s  protected mark. If the airbags were genuine, they carried an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $4,856.

The remainder of the CBP article highlights the dangers of purchasing fake parts that may not function as well as OEM parts.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs for suspicion of counterfeit goods, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes undervalued Range Rovers prior to export to Nigeria

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Seized Range Rover, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Delaware seized a 2016 Land Rover Range Rover prior to export to Lagos, Nigeria.

The vehicle worth approximately $55,000 was undervalued in export documents with a value of $13,000. Customs seized the vehicle for violation of 13 USC 305 which is submission of filing a false export declaration and undervaluing an export. 13 USC 305 is fairly broad and used often as a basis for export seizures.

This seizure in Delaware is just one of the many reasons Customs will seize vehicles prior to export – if you have had your vehicle detained or seized by Customs prior to export overseas to places such as Nigeria, the UAE, China, etc, contact experienced vehicle seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes +$2 million in counterfeit goods from China.

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Counterfeit goods seized by CBP, source: cbp.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Washington Dulles airport seized fake goods from China with a MSRP of $2 million destined to Flushing, New York.

The air cargo shipment contained 2,601 coin purses, 459 purses, and backpacks with counterfeit logos of luxury brand names such as Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Chanel.

When CBP seizes suspected counterfeit goods, they send samples and photos to the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) for verification with the trademark holders.

The goods were determined to be counterfeit (no trademark holder has ever agreed that a product was not counterfeit), and if authentic, would have an MSRP of $2,244,370.

If you have had your shipment seized by CBP on suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for assistance, we can explore your options. If you have received a penalty notice for violation of intellectual property rights, give us a call or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP intercepts invasive “almond bug” from Italy.

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Image of the “almond bug”, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, Agriculture Specialist canine alerted CBP officers to a passenger’s bag arriving from from Italy. The Agriculture Specialists inspected the item and found prohibited plant items such as pomegranates. Examination of the pomegranates led to the discovery of an insect that was then sent to the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) for identification. The insect was identified as the Monosteira unicostata, or “Almond bug.”

This species of pest poses a serious risk to the $5.3 billion California almond industry. These bugs are typically found in almond trees in the Mediterranean region.

If you have had your shipment seized due to invasive species or had a shipment seized due to invasive pests located in or among wooden packaging materials – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu to explore options – call/text 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake lead batteries seized in Puerto Rico.

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Image of seized batteries, source: cbp.gov

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers media release, officers at the Port of San Juan, Puerto Rico, seized 1,072 counterfeit rechargeable deep cycle lead batteries under the “Reverse RU” trademark.

The lead batteries are used for solar backup systems, the MSRP if genuine is $208,068.

This seizure is just 1 of the 33,810 shipments seized by Customs in FY 2018. If you have had your items seized for suspected trademark violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes prohibited fertilizer from Mexico.

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Bottle of seized fertilizer, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Baltimore along with agriculture specialists detained two travelers from California carrying a bottle of what was declared as “organic liquid fertilizer” containing soil, compost, ashes and cattle manure.
As soil may contain invasive pests and other items such as weed seeds and fungal and bacterial diseases, US agriculture specialists tested the fertilizer. Since cattle manure poses an agriculture threat for cattle diseases, it is not allowed entry into the US unless an import permit and certificate the manure was properly treated.
If you have had a customs or CBP seizure and want your items back, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

$2.2 million worth of fake Nike shoes seized by Customs.

Image of seized Nike shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers assigned to the port at LA/Long Beach seized over 14,806 pairs of counterfeit Nike shoes that if genuine, carry an estimated MSRP of $2,247,680.

The seizure was multi-agency and included U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents assigned at the Trade Enforcement Coordination Center (TECC). The shoes were discovered during examination of a shipment from China and were misdeclared as “napkins”.

Apparel, Footwear and Textiles Center of Excellence (AFT Center) import specialists and the trademark owner confirmed the shoes were in violation of Nike’s Air Jordan 1 Off-White, Air Jordan 12, Air Jordan 1 (blue, black, red, white), Air Jordan 11, Air Max ’97 protected designs and trademarks.

If you have had your goods seized by CBP or if they are sending you a civil penalty or you are facing criminal penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP intercepts stolen SUV destined for West Africa.

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Image of seized stolen SUV, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized a stolen 2018 Cadillac Escalade, valued at more than $57,000 at the Port of Wilmington, Del, September 25th.

This most recent seizure was one of 16 stolen vehicles seized this year at the Port of Wilmington, a combined value of over $454,007 in stolen vehicles.

The vehicle was seized during a routine CBP inspection of outbound shipments destined for West Africa when the VIN number was associated with a 2018 Mercedes Benz.

Further investigation found the true VIN and the SUV was traced to a stolen vehicle in North Carolina along with fraudulent titles and export documents.

In instances such as the above, CBP will not release these vehicles – however, if you export vehicles and have complied with all the requirements, CBP may still seize your vehicle – if so, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Zimbabwe claims CBP’s accusation of use of forced labor in their diamond mine is a “shameless lie”.

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Photo by W W on Pexels.com

Earlier this week, I blogged about CBP’s issuance of a Withhold Release Order (WRO) that allows CBP to seize products produced “in whole or in part using forced labor”.

One of the products subject to detention are “Rough diamonds from the Marange Diamond Fields in Zimbabwe; mined from forced labor.

Earlier today, moneyweb.co.za (a Zimbabwe financial web publication) accused the US of lying about diamond mining at the Marange Diamond Fields using forced labor – calling the claim a “shameless lie”.

In support of their claim, the article cites the Kimberley Process (steps that are taken to ensure diamond mining isn’t used to fund conflicts) finding that there are no restrictions on trade in Zimbabwean diamonds. The Kimberley Process represents 81 countries and covers 99.8% of the global rough diamond production.

Zimbabwe’s deputy mines minister, Polite Kambamura is quoted as saying the “doors are open” if CBP wants to visit Marange and that “we are a responsible state miner that operates within the laws of the country and we observe strict adherence to critical tenets of corporate governance”.

Like Marange in Zimbabwe, if you feel your company has been wrongly placed on CBP’s WRO list, contact experienced customs and trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake NBA championship rings worth $560,000 seized by Customs.

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Image of counterfeit NBA rings, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release – officers assigned at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) seized 28 counterfeit NBA rings with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $560,000.

According to the media release, the rings were shipped from China and packaged in a wooden box to be sold as a collection of championship rings from multiple teams – including the Cavaliers, Lakers, Bulls, etc.

When CBP suspects items are counterfeit, they will take photos or send samples to the  Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Center of Excellence (CPMM Center) for a final determination regarding the authenticity of the items. If they are determined to be counterfeit, CBP will seize the goods and issue a seizure notice to the importer of record (in this instance, it is a not a formal entry – so the notice would be shipped to the person receiving the goods).

If you have had your goods seized by CBP, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.