San Juan CBP seizes counterfeit luxury products worth $265,000.

Image of seized Rolex watches, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents in San Juan seized counterfeit watches and jewelry from a shipment from Hong Kong. If genuine, the value of the counterfeit products would total approximately $256,000. The above image from Customs shows a display of the fake Rolex brand watches seized.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, you may face both criminal and civil penalties. Contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 to discuss your options – feel free to also send us an email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Seizes Fake Cat and Dog Flea Collars.

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Counterfeit “seresto” brand food, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Pittsburgh seized 58 fake “Seresto” brand dog and cat flea collars so far this month. CBP officers seized the 13 parcels and submitted samples the the trademark holder, Bayer. The shipments were from China and Hong Kong and if genuine have an approximate retail value of $3,500.

CBP has warned pet owners to not purchsae counterfeit collars as they may contain harmful ingredients that could cause chemical burns or fur loss.

If your goods have been seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text for a no cost or obligation consultation at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Wigs and books seized for containing counterfeit currency.

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Image of wigs containing concealed cash, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Dallas Fort Worth port of entry found $63,000 in counterfeit currency in separate shipments from Nigeria. One shipment contained soft cover books, that upon further inspection yielded currency taped to the pages of the books. The other shipment contained wigs and hair. Upon examination, CBP officers opened the package and found currency in $50 and $100 denominations.

The media release says the counterfeit currency was turned over to the Secret Service.

Funny Money

Image of $100 bills taped to the inside of pages, source: cbp.gov

In general, currency seizures are handled by CBP. In general if your currency case is referred to Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), this means Customs likely believes your seized currency is related to something criminal. If your currency seizure case is referred to the United States Secret Service (USSS), it means your currency is suspected to be counterfeit.

If your currency has been seized by CBP, HSI or the USSS, then contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

CBP seizes unsafe toy ducks.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at the Georgia seaport seized 5,000 stuffed toy ducks after tests found the ducks contained excessive amounts of lead.

The container arrived from Hong Kong and was labeled in boxes labeled “Doctor Duck”. The toys were detained and a sample was shipped to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) for testing.
Test results found the toys contained excess levels of lead and cannot be entered into the US, meaning the next step for CBP will be to destroy the over $100,000 worth of toys.
If your shipment has been seized for excessive lead paint, contact David Hsu for a no cost consultation at 832-896-6288 or by email to attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit Super Bowl rings seized.

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Image of seized rings, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers at O’Hare’s International Mail Facility seized a package of 35 counterfeit NFL Championship rings from China. The April shipment was held for further inspection due to x-ray images showing inconsistencies. The shipment was declared as ring and valued at $10 each. However, upon opening the packages, CBP officers found 35 counterfeit NFL Championship rings. CBP determined the rings to be counterfeit due to poor quality, poor packaging and low value. The approximate MSRP of the rings, if real, would have been $350,000.

According to the Customs media release:

The parcel contained fake Superbowl rings for the NY Jets (1) and Giants (4), Pittsburgh Steelers (6), San Francisco 49ers (5), Dallas Cowboys (5), Washington Redskins (5), Green Bay Packers (6) and Denver Broncos (3).

If you have had your shipment seized for IPR violations, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit markers seized in Minnesota.

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Seized fake “Sharpies”, source: CBP.gov

So I blog a lot about seized goods, mostly luxury goods, phones, shoes, medicine, and recently COVID test kits – however this is the first time I’ve seen Customs publish a media release on seizure of school supplies.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Minnesota inspected a rail container and discovered market sets violating intellectual property rights. The seizure contained 5,000 marker sets and if genuine would carry an MRSP of about $115,000. Based off the above picture supplied by Customs, it appears they seized these goods for not using the “Sharpie” brand word mark, but likely for copying the design of the barrel and cap commonly seen on “Sharpie” brand permanent marker.

If your goods have been seized, there may be something you can do – contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP officers seize counterfeit luxury goods.

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Image of counterfeit shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in North Dakota inspected a rail container and found counterfeit shoes and a dress. CBP officers examined the shoes and seized the shipment for violating intellectual property rights (IPR). From looking at the photo by CBP, it appears the use of the word mark was the basis for the seizure. Most counterfeiters typically copy the pattern, but adding the word mark does violate the IPR.

If authentic, the estimated MSRP of the goods is approximately $28,545.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact David Hsu for a no-cost, no obligation consultation. There are certain things you must know to protect yourself if your goods have been seized. Contact by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Agriculture Specialists intercept several invasive pests.

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Photo by Brent Keane on Pexels.com

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agriculture Specialists (CBPAS) in Portal found mission grass on wood packing material from Vietnam. This weed is an invasive species that spreads by seed and native to tropical Africa. Mission grass is usually used for cattle feed, but can invated cultivated fields and overtake crops.

Besides mission grass, CBPAS in Portal also found several boring beetle trails carved into the wood on one of the pallets holding cargo. Following the trails resulted in finding four live wood boring beetle larvae. CBPAS later identified the larva as longhorn beetles. Longhorn beetles are invasive species that harm the timber industry, wildlife habitats and urban landscapes.

Lastly in Minneosa, CBPAS officers found the exoskeletons of larval khapra beetles. Khapra beetles have larval covered in fine hairs that contaminate the products they infest. Khapra beetles also are difficult to remove – they live up to 7 years without food and are resistant to insecticides.

If you have had your shipment seized for invasive species, contact David Hsu by phone/text for a no-cost or obligation consultation at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP officers seize counterfeit televisions.

Televisions

Image of seized television, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers at Minneosta’s International Falls Port of Entry inspected a rail container and found 440 televisions that violated intellectual property rights (IPR) regulations. If genuine, the MSRP of the goods would retail for approximately $175,560.

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The CBP media release did not specify what IPR violations occurred. Judging by the photo above provided by Customs, I suspect there may be two issues:

(1) The USB logo is used, however, the manufacturer of this TV may not have been qualified to display the certified USB logo.

(2) I think the main reason is the use of the “HDMI” logo on the box. The HDMI logo, and High-Definition Multimedia Interface are trademarks or registered trademarks to HDMI Licensing, LLC.

Based on what’s on the press release, there are several options for the importer of record. If you have had any goods seized by Customs, contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu anytime by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake Cialis and Viagra Pills Seized by CBP.

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Counterfeit medication from Turkey; source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Kentucky seized counterfeit Cialis and Viagra pills in Kentucky. The shipment from Turkey was destined to a city in California and labeled as “throat lozenges and candies”. However, CBP’s experienced officers looked at the totality of the circumstances and determined the route of the shipment and the packaging of the pills were indicative of being counterfeit pills.

Customs warns consumers of the dangers of buying counter medicines – which may have the incorrect or harmful ingredients.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.