CBP Returns artifacts to Cyprus Government

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Image of seized coins being returned to the Cyprus Government; source: CBP.govQ

Back in 2009, U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) seized a shipment of ancient coins in a 2009 air cargo shipment from London to a coin collector in Missouri. CBP officers seized the coins and sent a request to the coin collector for documentation to show they could import the goods.

In general, CBP is tasked with returning cultural property (arts, artifacts, antiques, etc) to the country that owns the cultural property. CBP does require importers to have the correct documents to show they have the ability to import the goods in to the US. In the instnat seizure, the collector in Missouri told CBP they did not have authority from Cyprus and the coins were seized. Recently, the coin collector lost their legal battle and the coins were returned to the government of Cyprus in a ceremony at the Cyprus Embassy in Washington D.C.

According to the Customs media release:

An appraisal determined that the collection dated from the Roman Empire, from several periods during 81 BC through 217 AD. The collection includes:

Two bronze coins from an unspecified Roman period
One coin from the Ptolemaeus period, 81 BC -58 BC
One coin from the Augustus period, 27 BC – 14 AD
Two coins from the Tiberius period, 14-37 AD
One coin from the Severan period, 193 AD – 217 AD

If you have had your import seized because they were a “cultural artifact”, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu to evaluate your options. Phone/text 832-896-6288 at anytime or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP intercepts stolen SUV destined for West Africa.

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Image of seized stolen SUV, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized a stolen 2018 Cadillac Escalade, valued at more than $57,000 at the Port of Wilmington, Del, September 25th.

This most recent seizure was one of 16 stolen vehicles seized this year at the Port of Wilmington, a combined value of over $454,007 in stolen vehicles.

The vehicle was seized during a routine CBP inspection of outbound shipments destined for West Africa when the VIN number was associated with a 2018 Mercedes Benz.

Further investigation found the true VIN and the SUV was traced to a stolen vehicle in North Carolina along with fraudulent titles and export documents.

In instances such as the above, CBP will not release these vehicles – however, if you export vehicles and have complied with all the requirements, CBP may still seize your vehicle – if so, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.