CBP intercepts termites from entering the US.

Image of lumber from Cameroon, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers intercepted a shipment of lumber from Cameroon containing termites. The pests were found around the stacks of lumber for entry into the US. When CBP finds invasive pests or larvae of potentially invasive species, a sample is collected and submitted to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for further analysis and confirmation.

The container with the lumber was sealed and secured while USDA evaluates the sample pest, ultimately determining the termites as Kalotermitidae species, or commonly known as the dry worm termites. These termites are known to damage timber used as a structure and hardwood floors in the home.

If you have your shipment seized by Customs due to the presence of an invasive species -whether the wood-boring wasp or a dry worm termite – contact David Hsu immediately to discuss your options. Depending on the type of pest, there may be some cost effective options instead of re-exporting back to the origination. Call/text anytime to 832-896-6288 or email David at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Image of termite, source: CBP.gov

Invasive and destructive beetle larvae seized by Customs.

Image of the intercepted khapra beetle larvae, source: CBP.gov

According to a US Customs media release, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists intercepted beetle larvae found on a shipment of welding wire from China. The larvae were sent to the US Department of Agriculture for testing and identification and identified as Trogoderma granarium Everts or the commonly known Khapra beetle. As a result of identification, the shipment was sealed to prevent potential contamination with other shipments.

According to CBP, Khapra beetles are dangerous pests that pose a risk to grain and other stored seeds. The Khapra beetle is usually located in burlap bags, corrugated carboard boxes and animal hides. Originally from India, Khapra beetles are found in shipments from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Asia and some parts of Europe.

If you have received a notice of action or if Customs has found a pest in your import – time is of the essence – contact attorney David Hsu for immediate assistance – phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Agriculture Specialists intercept several invasive pests.

pexels-photo-1684989

Photo by Brent Keane on Pexels.com

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agriculture Specialists (CBPAS) in Portal found mission grass on wood packing material from Vietnam. This weed is an invasive species that spreads by seed and native to tropical Africa. Mission grass is usually used for cattle feed, but can invated cultivated fields and overtake crops.

Besides mission grass, CBPAS in Portal also found several boring beetle trails carved into the wood on one of the pallets holding cargo. Following the trails resulted in finding four live wood boring beetle larvae. CBPAS later identified the larva as longhorn beetles. Longhorn beetles are invasive species that harm the timber industry, wildlife habitats and urban landscapes.

Lastly in Minneosa, CBPAS officers found the exoskeletons of larval khapra beetles. Khapra beetles have larval covered in fine hairs that contaminate the products they infest. Khapra beetles also are difficult to remove – they live up to 7 years without food and are resistant to insecticides.

If you have had your shipment seized for invasive species, contact David Hsu by phone/text for a no-cost or obligation consultation at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP officers find and destroy gypsy moth eggs on coal ship.

BAL AGM1L 032220

Image of Asian Gypsy Moth Egg Mass, source: CBP.gov

According to a CBP media release, Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered an egg mass of the highly destructive Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) species on a coal freighter at the Port of Baltimore. The freighter, the M/V Mondial Sun arrived from the United Kingdom to take on coal, and previously called on ports in China and Japan during the summer of 2019. Ports in Asia are high-risk ports for AGM. After leaving Baltimore, the vessel was on the way to Japan.

With this harmful pest situation, CBP agriculture specialists removed the egg mass and treated the affected area with a pest spray.

According to Customs, the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) is one of the most destructive insect pests in the world. AGM are extremely mobile and can lay egg masses yielding hundreds of hungry caterpillars that in turn become other mobile AGM.

In this instance, CBP removed and treated the area where the harmful pests were found. Typically, CBP will discover larvae or the pests themselves inside wood packaging material on cargo ships – if you receive an emergency action notice regarding pests in your shipment – time is of the essence. Contact experienced harmful pest attorney David Hsu immediately by phone/text to 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com

Invasive Gypsy Moth Eggs stopped by CBP.

BAL Xmas AGM2 122519.jpg

Image of the seized gypsy moth eggs, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP agriculture specialists found Japanese gypsy moth eggs on ocean freighters.

The eggs were found aboard the “Royal Hope” freighter and were removed by the ship’s crew and CBP agriculture specialists. The affected areas with the eggs were also sprayed by CBP with a pest spray oil.

These Japanese gypsy moth eggs are part of the overall Asian Gypsy Moth that damages trees and plants due to their big appetites. Additionally, the gypsy moth females are very mobile and travel up to 25 miles per day and can also lay egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars.

Fortunately, there are no known infestations of the asian gypsy moth.

In the media release, CBP said the “Royal Hope” freighter from Ghent, Belgium was to pick up coal for export and prior to leaving Belgium, the royal Hope made a port call in Japan where they removed adult moths and egg masses prior to issuing a certificate clearing the vessel to depart.

If you or someone you know has received a notice from customs for suspected pests such as the asian gympsy moth (or any other invasive pest), contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP inspects agriculture shipments for pests and diseases.

christmas tree with decors under the staircase

Photo by Jonathan Borba on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, Agriculture Specialist have inspected thousands of fresh cut Christmas trees, which are imported from Canada since last October continuing all the way to December. Puerto Rico has the longest Christmas holiday celebration in the World and trees are imported from November into mid-January.

Christmas Tree shipments to Puerto Rico were inspected by the US Department of Agriculture, which may require them be treated to remove harmful insects, diseases or pest that can spread and contaminate other trees or crops.

Some of the invasive species identified by CBP Agricultural Specialists have determined to be invasive pests include: Altica sp. (Chrysomelidae), Aphalara cathae (Linnaeus), Arion sp. (Arionidae), Caloptilla sp. (Gracillariidae), Cepaea sp. (Helicidae), Cinara sp. (Aphididae), Deroceras reticulatum (Muller), Galerucini Hylobius sp. (Curculionidae), Hylobius sp. (Curculionidae), Insecta Otiohynchus singularia (Linnaeus), Paria sp. (Chrysomelidae), Pubillia sp. (Membracidae), Pyrrharctia Isabella (Erebidae), and Xyleborus sp. (Curculionidae).

If your shipment has been seized by customs for containing invasive pests or if you have had a wood packaging/pest issue – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP prohibits invasive pests from importation to the US.

CHM Invasive Pests Insects.jpg

Image of invasive pests, source: CBP.gov

As we enter the holiday season, Agriculture Specialists with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) were busy conducting searches of trucks containing Christmas tree and greenery shipments. Over 200 trucks and 170,000 plant units were inspected, resulting in the interception of more than 350 invasive pests. Two of the invasive pests can be seen in the photo above.

Mid-November to early-December are the busiest times for the importation of trees and greenery used around the holidays. Without the help of CBP Agriculture Specialists, some of those pests may have arrived to certain parts of the US where they do not have any natural predators, resulting in millions of dollars in damage and the loss of large numbers of trees.

Typically if your imported items contain invasive pests, the items will be destroyed and not allowed into the stream of commerce. Our clients frequently encounter invasive pests (such as the wood-boring wasp) and their larve in wood packaging materials (WPM) used in the shipment of breakbulk and other containerized shipping to the US.

If you or anyone you know has had an invasive pest issue with WPM or your shipment is being denied entry into the US due to invasive pests, contact experienced WPM attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP intercepts invasive “almond bug” from Italy.

Newark - Mature Tingidae

Image of the “almond bug”, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, Agriculture Specialist canine alerted CBP officers to a passenger’s bag arriving from from Italy. The Agriculture Specialists inspected the item and found prohibited plant items such as pomegranates. Examination of the pomegranates led to the discovery of an insect that was then sent to the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) for identification. The insect was identified as the Monosteira unicostata, or “Almond bug.”

This species of pest poses a serious risk to the $5.3 billion California almond industry. These bugs are typically found in almond trees in the Mediterranean region.

If you have had your shipment seized due to invasive species or had a shipment seized due to invasive pests located in or among wooden packaging materials – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu to explore options – call/text 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Agriculture Specialists in Texas find first discovery of pest in the US.

Dysschema mariamne_dorsal, courtesy CBP Hidalgo

Dysschema mariamne Warren (Erebidae), source: CBP

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, agriculture specialists at the Pharr, Texas Port of Entry discovered a rare pest, a first in nation discovery, in a shipment of prickly pear pads.

Specifically, CBP agents found the Dysschema mariamne Warren (Erebidae), a first in nation pest.

The Erebidae was discovered upon an inspection of shipment of pear pads from Mexico. After it was discovered, the U.S. Department of Agriculture entomology laboratory was consulted and the initial identification was later confirmed by a national specialist as Dysschema mariamne Warren (Erebidae). According to USDA entomologists, this pest has never been found at any of the nation’s ports of entry. CBP refused entry to the shipment and returned it back to Mexico.

If you have had a shipment detained by Customs for containing invasive species, or have had a shipment detained due to pests found in wood packaging materials – contact experienced customs seizure and detention attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Baltimore CBP stops Asian Gypsy Moths from entering US.

BALAGM5high091219

CBP agriculture specialists removing egg mass, source: cbp.gov

Last week, CBP agriculture specialists at the Port of Baltimore detected over 120 egg masses across 4 different ships.
The Asian Gypsy Moth or AGM for short is a destructive invasive insect pests that is not typically found in the United States. CBP agriculture specialists at Baltimore have intercepted over 120 of the AGM egg masses since July of this year.
The AGM, scientifically known as the Lymantria dispar asiatica/japonica, pose a significant threat to the national forests and urban landscape because they are very mobile and can travel up to 25 miles per day- laying egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars.
If you have had a shipment seized, detained or requiring re-export for fumigation – call experienced pest and invasive species attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com – there may be some other options available besides re-export. Time is of the essence in bug cases so call now!