CBP finds rare first-in-nation pest in importation of corn.

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A specimen of Cratosomus punctulatus
Gyllenhal
, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Brownsville, Texas intercepted a rare “First in Nation” pest in a shipment of corn.  The interception of the pest occurred at the Los Indios International Bridge import lot in a shipment of fresh corn from Mexico.
When the corn was inspected, CBP officers found the pest and submitted it to a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist. The initial identification was later confirmed by a national specialist as Cratosomus punctulatus Gyllenhal (Curculionidae) a pest not known to occur in the United States and intercepted for the first time in the nation.
This is a type of snout weevil that are plant feeders and many weeevils are pests of agricultural crops and forests.
If you have had your shipment seized due to pests or other invasive species, there may be some alternatives besides the ones given to you by Customs – contact experienced wood packing material and pest seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US Customs agents ensure pest-free flowers just in time for Valentine’s Day.

Customs VDay

Source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, Customs’ agriculture specialists are working hard to examine the hundreds of millions of cut flower stems arriving into the US in time for Valentine’s Day later this week. CBP will especially exam cut flower stems to look for plant diseases and plant pests before they enter the United States.

While it is okay to bring flowers and floral arrangements into the US, there are some prohibited plant species that will be used in the arrangement and that all agricultural products are declared.

CBP officers at the Laredo filed office processed 11.3 million cut flower stems from January to February 14th and ranks fifth largest office by volume for cut flower importations nationwide.

If you  have received a notice from Customs or have any further questions, call experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP stops harmful Asian Gypsy Moth found aboard a vessel.

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Photo by icon0.com on Pexels.com

In late April, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists stopped the importation of viable eggs of the Asian Gypsy Moth found aboard a vessel

Once the vessel arrived at the port, CBP agriculture specialists found egg masses which they suspect were to be the Asian Gypsy moth.

The Asian gypsy moth is harmful to US vegetation because it feed on trees and plants. The danger is further highlighted by the fact a female gypsy moth can lay hundreds of eggs that develop into caterpillars.

If you have had a vessel detained by CBP and received a notice from CBP regarding pests – contact experienced customs attorney, David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.