Houston CBP finds Asian Gypsy Moths and Egg Masses on international vessel.

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Image of egg pods seized in Houston, source: CBP.gov

According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), agriculture specialists from Houston found two dead female Asian Gypsy Moths (AGMs) and 20 Asian Gypsy moth egg masses on the superstructure of an international vessel. CBP was notified of this vessel after they received notification from Japanese inspectors of 52 egg masses and 52 live moths before the vessel departed to the US.

The AGM’s are an invasive species that damages hardwood forests and urban landscapes. CBP says the AGM’s can lay 500-1,000 eggs that become hungry caterpillars, resulting in a potential to defoliate a million acres annually.

When vessels are found to contain invasive pests, Customs requires the vessel and shipment to be re-exported, fumigated, then returned to Houston. According to the media release, the vessel had to depart and return “multiple times” before CBP determined it did not contain AGM or their egg masses.

t of Agriculture (USDA) for identification; the agency confirmed Aug. 2 that the pests were in fact AGM. As required by law, the vessel left the port to receive treatment and to provide verification that it was free from AGM and egg masses.

The vessel had to depart and return multiple times before CBP agriculture specialists determined that it was absolutely free from AGM egg masses.

If you or someone you know has a shipment seized by CBP for containing invasive species or eggs from invasive species, contact experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP officers seize $663K in unmarked Viagra pills.

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Image of the seized pills, source: cbp.gov

According to a US Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers in Mississippi seized a shipment containing 27,000 unmarked Viagra capsules.

The shipment originated from Hong Kong and was estimated to have a MSRP of $663,000. The capsules were seized due to improper marking and only after inspection were the pills discovered to contain the active ingredient in Viagra – Sildenafil citrate. Specifically, the shipment violated the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, prohibiting the importation of drugs that are adulterated or misbranded.

If you have had a seizure by Customs, call our office immediately, there are certain things you must do within 30 days of any Customs seizure – David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP finds and destroys Asian Gypsy Moth egg masses.

AGM Masses in Vials

Images of AGM egg masses seized in Baltimore, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, agriculture specialists in Baltimore discovered egg masses belonging to the Asian Gypsy Moths (AGM). The AGM are an invasive pest that threaten US forests and urban landscapes.

Customs claims the AGM can travel up to 25 miles per hour and lay egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars that eat and attack over 500 species of trees and plants.

Vessels from Asia entering the US are typically subject to greater inspection to detect and remove the egg masses and vessels departing ports are inspected and certified to be free of AGM or egg masses.

If you have any import, export, trade or compliance questions, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes toys without proper labels – won’t somebody think of the children?

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Image of the seized toys. Source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers at the Champlain Port of Entry seized a shipment of toys valued at $28,747 due to a lack of a required tracking label and lack of a General Certificate of Conformity as required by the Consumer Product Safety Act.

What is a General Certificate of Conformity (GCC)?

  1. A GCC is required for products made overseas or by a US manufacturer of a domestically produced good.
  2. The certificate reflects the results of a test of each product.
  3. An extensive list of all non-children’s products requiring a test can be found here.
  4. The GCC is accompanied with a shipment and manufacturers/importers must provide GCC to a distributor or retailer.
  5. If a manufacturer or importer sells direct to consumers, then no GCC is necessary.
  6. If you would like a Sample GCC form, please email me.
  7. A GCC does not need to be filed with the Government.
  8. Electronic certificates are okay, with some manufacturers and importers posting their certificates online.
  9. A GCC is required for EACH shipment.
  10. A GCC does not need to be signed.
  11. Failure to provide a GCC could lead to civil and criminal penalties.

If you have any questions or want to be in compliance with the GCC requirements, contact David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit Cartier products valued over $2.6 million.

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Counterfeit Cartier bracelets, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Louisiana intercepted 180 pieces of counterfeit Cartier jewelry from a shipment from Hong Kong. If authentic Cartier, the bracelets would hold a MSRP of more than $2.6 million.

CBP officers inspected the parcel with a packing list specifying “jewelry accessory”. Upon inspection, they found bracelets packaged in Cartier boxes and determined the poor quality bracelets were counterfeit.

As have been previously posted on this blog, Hong Kong is commonly known by CBP to frequently ship counterfeit jewelry such as watches and accessories such as hats. This seizure is the largest (in terms of dollar value) for the entire year.

 

CBP stops invasive Scarab beetle pests from entering the US.

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Scarab beetle, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists in Florida stopped several invasive pests from entering the US – specifically the scarab beetle and heteroptera. The scarab beetle can infest and destroy crops while the heteroptera is known to damage plant roots.

According to the CBP media release, agriculture specialists in 2018 seized on average 319 pests at U.S. ports of entry and 4,552 materials for quarantine: plant, meat, animal byproduct and soil each day!

If you have had a Customs seizure due to an infestation of pests or wood-boring insects in wooden packaging materials – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes hatching eggs shipped from the Netherlands.

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Image of hatching eggs, source: cbp media release.

Earlier this month U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the international mail facility in Miami seized 30 suspected hatching eggs. The shipment from the Netherlands is the third shipment intercepted with hatching eggs.

The shipment label identified the shipment as “Children’s Toys”, however an x-ray performed found 30 hatching eggs. Shipment of eggs is allowed, but do require an import permit. The eggs were seized due to the risk they may carry the Exotic Newcastle Disease.

If you have questions about your imports or want to be sure you have the right permits to import, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Delaware CBP reports 2 insect discovery firsts.

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Ozodes multituberculatus. source: USDA photo.

CBP agriculture specialists along with the USDA confirmed the first arrival of two insects at the Wilmington, Delaware port.

In early June, CBP agriculture specialists found an long-horned beetle, an invasive species int he US as they bore into wood and can cause extensive damage to trees. The following week, CBP agriculture specialists discovered an adult weevil in pineapples from Guatemala – the weevils post a threat to our domestic grains and crops.

In the event pests are found, the common CBP protocol is to re-export and fumigate the shipment.

If you have had a shipment or container seized due to the presence of pests such as the weevil, beetle or wood boring wasp or other insect, contact experienced fumigation attorney David Hsu by phone/email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes $17k from Jamaica-bound Traveler.

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Photo by Negative Space on Pexels.com

According to a Customs media release, CBP officers in Philadelphia seized $16,542 in unreported currency from a traveler heading to Jamaica.

Upon initial questioning, the traveler indicated to CBP officials he was carrying $6,000. CBP then explained to him the reporting requirements and the traveler indicated in writing he was carrying $8,000. Upon secondary inspection, CBP found $16,542 in the traveler’s carry-on bag.

What do you do if Customs asks how much you are carrying?
Be truthful and tell them how much you are carrying, even if it exceeds the $10,000.

Do I sign the form they present to me?
Sometimes CBP will ask you to sign a form indicating how much money you are carrying – fill out that form truthfully and declare all the money you are carrying.

I’m traveling with my family, do I include the currency they are carrying?
Yes, count the currency of everyone traveling in your party (your kids, spouse, parents, in-laws, friends, etc).

They seized my currency, what do I do?
Contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288. I’m available 24/7 by phone or text. Or email me anytime at my personal email: attorney.dave@yahoo.com or my work email: dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

Custom seizes counterfeit baseball jerseys.

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Photo by Tim Gouw on Pexels.com

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), officers seized 314 counterfeit jerseys for Phliadelphia Phillies player, Bryce Harper. If authentic, the estimated value of the counterfeit totals over $44,040.

CBP’s media release further states the harm to the wearer (potential use of flammable textiles) and the economic harm to the US (trademark holders lose revenue, loss of revenue for American workers) and the funding of black market activities such as human trafficking.

If you have had a CBP seizure for the suspicion of counterfeit items, contact experienced customs seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.