Japan-US Trade Pact in effect starting January 1, 2020.

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Mt. Fuji in the background, source: Jane Chang

The Japan-U.S. trade agreement started in April 2019, and starting January 1st, comes into effect, resulting in an immediate cut in tariffs on American farm products and a variety of Japanese industrial goods. Unfortunately, the trade agreement does not include passenger cars and auto parts. In addition to a trade agreement, the US and Japan reached an agreement on digital trade. As the US pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, this trade agreement was crucial for continued US/Japan trade.

Some terms of the trade deal include a reduction in import duty of US beef from 38.5% to 26.6%, with the ultimate duty rate of 9% in 2033. Other duties on cheese, wine, pork will eventually reach zero. In return, US duties on Japanese air conditioner parts and fuel cells were also removed as part of the deal.

While this current trade deal does not address import duties on cars and parts from Japan, second round talks with Washington (set for April 2020) may result in a trade deal. But the United States maintains import duties on cars and auto parts from Japan, despite strong calls for their abolition by the Japanese side.

We have been keeping up with this new trade deal, if you are wondering how it may impact your business, give us a call or text at 832-896-6288 or send us an email to David Hsu at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or work official email: dh@gjatradelaw.com.

USMCA to be signed on Wednesday 1/29.

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Official portrait of President Donald J. Trump, Friday, October 6, 2017. (Official White House photo by Shealah Craighead)

As you are aware, the Senate passed the USMCA legislation last week. According to Reuters, President Trump will sign the USMCA trade agreement next Wednesday at the White House. The Reuters article cites unnamed sources regarding invitations for the upcoming ceremony.

This new US Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA) wills replace NAFTA and still requires formal approval from Canada.

Contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com if you have questions how the new USMCA may impact your business.

Senate passes USMCA, heads to Trump’s desk.

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Official portrait of President Donald J. Trump, Friday, October 6, 2017. (Official White House photo by Shealah Craighead)

After passing through the House, the Senate just passed the USMCA trade deal by 89-10 vote. The new trade deal will now head to Trump’s desk for his signature.

Contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu if you have any questions on how the new trade deal will impact your business, phone/text 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US China set to sign a trade deal on Wednesday.

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On January 15th, the US and China are expected to sign phase one of the new trade deal between the two nations. The deal is 86 pages long and the full content has not yet been released.

According to Barron’s, citing a former Trump administration trade negotiator, the deal will cover 5 areas:

1.  Commitment from China to stop forced technology transfers.

2. Process for China to create judicial proceedings to enforce trade law secrets, patent extensions for US pharmaceuticals.

3. No further currency manipulation

4. Commitment by China to buy more agricultural products.

5. Use science-based risk assessment when determining whether to ban US imports.

Will post more details as soon as they are confirmed. If you have any questions about the trade deal or general import and export questions, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US China Trade Deal as of 12/13/2019.

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Official portrait of President Donald J. Trump, Friday, October 6, 2017. (Official White House photo by Shealah Craighead)

As you are aware, the Trump administration has confirmed a trade deal with China has been reached.

Phase one of the trade deal was just announced:

-List 1 remains at 25%

-List 2 remains at 25%

-List 3 remains at 25%

-List 4b is gone (4b was initially scheduled to take effect December 15th, and included consumer electronics such as cell phones, laptops, computers, etc.).

-“Most” (not all) of List 4a is going to drop to 7.5%.

We will monitor the Federal Register for what specifically is being reduced. If you have any further questions, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu for immediate help by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US China trade war update.

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According to a Bloomberg article today, sources close to the negotiations indicate the US and China are working on an agreement to phase one of a trade deal, despite Congress’ recent resolution in support of the Uighur population in Xinjiang coupled with the Trump administration’s signing of a bill supporting pro-democracy Hong Kong protesters.

The agreement will likely occur before December 15th, when the next list of tariffs are set to rise. Currently issues include guarantees of China’s purchases of US agricultural goods and which duties to roll back.

More news will be posted once an agreement has been reached. If you have any questions how the US/China trade war will impact your business, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

Russia trying to legalise blood diamonds from the CAR.

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According to the Independent, Moscow claims the international ban is not working and seeks to end an international embargo on diamonds exported from the Central African Republic (CAR) since 2013. At the moment, the CAR is the only country in the world subject to a ban on “blood diamonds”.

The main reason Moscow wants to end the embargo on CAR diamonds is because 90% of the CAR’s diamonds are exported through the black market.

Blood diamonds refers to diamonds mined in a a war zone, and then sold to finance war activity.

Next year, Russia will chair the Kimberley Process, a UN program designed to stop diamond profits flowing to armed militias or used to fund war. Estimates put the Kimberley Process as high as 99.8% successful in stopping the global production of blood diamonds.

If you have any questions about the Kimberley Process and how it will effect your imports of diamonds to the US, contact experienced trade law attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

India says they will not join the largest free trade deal – the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP).

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Yesterday, India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi announced India would not join the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP).

The RSCEP is a proposed trade deal among 16 countries and has been discussed for the past 7 years and the subject of over 28 rounds of discussion. The RCEP was believed to be the “largest trade deal” because both China and India were expected to participate. China, India and 14-other nations in the RCEP would account for 40% of the world’s GDP.

In a public statement, the government of India cited several reasons to withdraw from the RCEP: (1) India wanted stronger wording on rules of origin, (2) change in the base year for the reduction of duties to be 2019 instead of 2014 and (3) for companies investing in India to procure a certain percentage of local input materials.

The remaining 15 countries have vowed to continue efforts to pass the RCEP with India’s involvement.

Do you have any general trade or customs law questions? Contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China’s #2, – Premier Li Keqiang eases trade tensions with the US.

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According to the New York Times, China’s Number 2 official, Premier Li Keqiang speaking at the World Economic Forum in the Chinese port city of Dalian, promised to cut tariffs, loosen restrictions on foreign investments, protect intellectual property rights and allow foreign companies to apply for China’s generous subsidies for research and development.

Speaking during a question and answer session, Li also said that China would allow foreign financial services companies into its market a year earlier than previously promised, and that it would rewrite many rules on foreign investment.

The NYT mentioned the lack of details, and indicated previous vague promises by Chinese officials in the past.

In addition to extending an olive branch to foreign companies, Premier Li’s remarks also sought to calm worries about the relocation of manufacturing overseas as a result of the Section 232 and 301 duties levied against China.

If you have questions how the China duties will impact your business, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Key 2019 Trade Deadlines.

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Happy new year everyone! Hope your new year is off to a great start.

2018 was a busy year for trade policy and 2019 will likely continue that trend. Here’s some important dates for trade in this new year:

1/1/2019 – the updated US trade agreement with South Korea signed in September 2018 will enter into force.

1/7/2019 – during this week, a US delegation will travel to Beijing for trade talks with Chinese officials. This will be the first face to face meeting since President Trump met with President Xi Jinping at the G20 summit on December 1st.

1/7/2019 – while a delegation goes to Beijing, the EU Trade Commissioner will meet with USTR Robert Lighthizer on other trade negotiations with the EU.

1/10/2019 – this is the deadline for submission of comments by US businesses regarding restrictions on high-tech American exports such as microprocessors and robotics

1/21/2019 – the US and Japan will likely enter into formal talks for a trade agreement.

2/17/2019 – deadline for the U.S. Department of Commerce to publish their report on the justification of tariffs on foreign cars. Once a report is submitted, President Trump has 3 months (May 18th) to make a decision on tariffs for foreign cars.

3/1/2019 – end of the 90-day truce started on December 1st. If no trade agreement is reached, $200 billion of Chinese goods will see increased tariffs from 10% to 25%.

4/2019 – deadline for the U.S. Department of Commerce to publish a national-secuirty report on the impact of uranium imports.

1st half of 2019 – congress will vote on the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement to replace NAFTA.

Check back for more updates as they become available. If you have any questions how these upcoming events will impact your business, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.