CBP seizes a combined total of $124k in unreported currency from travelers at Dulles airport.

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Last week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) seizure of three currency reporting violations resulted in a total seizure of over $124,000. The three violations included:

1. CBP seizure of $83,093 from a traveler to Ghana
2. CBP seizure of $23,082 from travelers arriving from Colombia
3. CBP seizure of $18,519 from a traveler to Pakistan

As you may or may not know, any traveler entering or departing the US must declare $10,000 or more in currency or monetary instruments. A common misconception among travelers is any declared value will be taxed – however, CBP will NOT tax any money reported. CBP will however, seize all unreported currency or monetary instruments over $10,000.

If you have had your hard earned money seized by customs while entering or departing the United States, call experienced money seizure attorney, David Hsu for immediate help – 832.896.6288, or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

Boston CBP Officers find $10k in cash sewn into arriving passenger’s pants.

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According to a CBP Public Affairs media release – on January 18, 2018, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at Logan International Airport seized more than $29,000 in undeclared currency from a traveler arriving on a flight from Israel.

The traveler (a U.S. Citizen), initially told CBP he was carrying $7,000 for him and an additional $7,000 for a friend. A subsequent baggage examination resulted in a finding of about $18,000 total. Upon even further inspection (which will always happen), CBP found an additional $10,000 sewn into the pockets of the pants belonging to the traveler.

As a general rule, travelers can carry as much cash and other forms of currency into and out of the United States as long as all amounts greater than $10,000 are reported on a U.S. Treasury Department financial form (FinCen 105 form).

Unfortunately for this traveler, how the money was concealed and the subsequent seizure means he will have to petition CBP to get back his money.

If you or anyone you know has had currency seized at an airport, seaport, or any other port of entry by CBP, call David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or email dhsu@givensjohnston.com for immediate assistance. Certain time limitations apply so call 832.896.6288 for a free consultation and to start getting your money back.

 

CBP seizes $110,000 in money from travelers going to Taiwan.

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According to a CBP Public Affairs release on December 12, 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston (IAH) seized over $110,000 USD from a couple flying from Houston (IAH) to Taipei (TPE).

International travelers leaving or entering the US can carry an unlimited amount of money must report any currency (checks, cash, money orders, etc.) in any denomination (USD, Euro, Yen, RMB, NTD, etc.) over $10,000.

The travelers subject of the December 12th press release reported $50,000 to CBP but a subsequent search resulted in a total finding of $110,204. The money was seized by CBP and the travelers departed to Taiwan.

The press release also indicates that CBP seizes approximately $289,609 in undeclared or illicit currency each day at the various air, land, and sea ports of entry into the United States.

If you or anyone you know has had money seized at any airport, border crossing or seaport while entering or leaving the US, contact David Hsu at 713.932.1540 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com for a free consultation.