CBP seizes $46,000 in cash from airport traveler.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.
Image of seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at Dulles airport seized about $46,628 in unreported currency from a man traveling to Cameroon. The random inspection occurred on outbound passengers on a flight to Brussels. CBP officers asked the individual how much money he was carrying – the traveler told Customs he had $30,000 and completed and signed a U.S. Treasury Department form (FINCEN 105).

Upon further inspection, CBP officers found a total of $46,628.00 and seized the entire amount. As you are aware, there is no limit how much cash you are bringing into or out of the US, the only requirement is for travelers to report currency $10,000 or greater.

According to the media release, the traveler “was not criminally charged”. This means CBP did not involve Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). If CBP brings involves HSI, then they believe your currency is related to criminal activity and you may need criminal counsel in addition to customs counsel.

If you have had your hard earned money seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.
CBP seized $46,628 in unreported
currency from Cameroon-bound man.
Source: CBP.gov

CBP seizes $91,000 in currency – could you be next?

$91,000+ in seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers at the Larredo, Texas Juarez-Lincoln Bridge seized $91,000 in unreported currency from a 30-year old male US citizen headed to Mexico.

When the male driver’s 2017 Chevrolet Equinox was referred to secondary inspection, CBP found $91,116 in undeclared US currency. This press release indicates CBP turned the case over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation.

In general, if your currency case is referred from CBP to Homeland Security, they believe the source of the funds may be from illegal activity and you will need to prepare a very strong seizure petition if you want your currency returned (minus a remission fee).

If you have had your hard-earned currency seized, contact David Hsu for immediate assistance at 832-896-6288 by phone or text. You can also email anytime at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit driver’s licenses continue to be imported (and seized).

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Image of seized ID’s, source: CBP.gov

In the past 18, Dallas CBP officers seized over 2000 counterfeit driver’s licenses from overseas, with 900 of the fake ID’s seized in the past 6 months. Most of the fake ID’s are hidden in contents of packages within larger items in the package. In an attempt to discourage the purchase of fake ID’s overseas, CBP officers noted that providing personal information to counterfeiters also carry a risk of the peron’s identity personal information being shared. From the media release, local law enforcement contacted the purchasers of the counterfeit ID cards and warned them of the risks of counterfeiters.

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In situations like this, the importer of record will not be getting these cards released and the case will likely be referred to HSI as part of a potential criminal case.

If you or someone you know receives a letter from CBP or Homeland Security Investigation, contact experienced customs attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$2.2 million worth of fake Nike shoes seized by Customs.

Image of seized Nike shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers assigned to the port at LA/Long Beach seized over 14,806 pairs of counterfeit Nike shoes that if genuine, carry an estimated MSRP of $2,247,680.

The seizure was multi-agency and included U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents assigned at the Trade Enforcement Coordination Center (TECC). The shoes were discovered during examination of a shipment from China and were misdeclared as “napkins”.

Apparel, Footwear and Textiles Center of Excellence (AFT Center) import specialists and the trademark owner confirmed the shoes were in violation of Nike’s Air Jordan 1 Off-White, Air Jordan 12, Air Jordan 1 (blue, black, red, white), Air Jordan 11, Air Max ’97 protected designs and trademarks.

If you have had your goods seized by CBP or if they are sending you a civil penalty or you are facing criminal penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.