Over $300,000 in unreported currency seized in P.R

Image of seized funds in PR, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers in Puerto Rico seized $348,940 in undeclared currency hidden inside wooden tables and a sink found inside a 1989 Ford cargo truck. The shipment was destined to an address in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

In general, there is no limit to how much currency (cash, checks, traveler’s checks, foreign currency) can be importer or exported by travelers. However, any amount over $10,000, however federal law requires travelers to report to CBP any amount exceeding $10,000 in US dollars or the equivalent in foreign currency. When the funds over $10,000 are not reported or are under-reported, CBP may seize the currency and may lead to an arrest.

If you have any questions about what to do BEFORE you travel and are carrying over $10,000, give David Hsu a call, or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Customs seizes $21,000 in unreported currency.

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Image of seized currency, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized $21,255 in unreported currency from traveler headed to Pakistan departing from Washington Dulles International Airport.

The passenger was headed to Pakistan through Turkey and was stopped for further inspection prior to boarding the plane. The traveler reported she had $6,000 and also told Customs officials she understood the currency reporting requirements.

Most of the time, Customs will make a traveler sign the FinCen 105 form before conducting a more detailed inspection.

After the traveler declared she had $6,000, a subsequent search by officers revealed she was carrying a combined $21,255. Customs returned her $255 for “humanitarian purposes” and seized $21,000 for violation of currency reporting requirements.

Depending on the amount seized, Customs may or may not return some money to the traveler for “humanitarian purposes” and the amount is discretionary.

Customs may or may not issue civil and criminal penalties for violation US currency requirements – in this instance, HSI was not involved so I do not believe Customs will pursue any criminal penalties.

If you have had your hard-earned currency seized by Customs, call experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com. There are certain deadlines that must be met to ensure your seized currency is not forfeited.

$72,000 in undeclared currency seized from traveler.

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Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, CBP officers at Orlando International Airport (MCO) seized over $72,000 in currency from a traveler who failed to declare the entire amount of the currency they were carrying.

The traveler initially said they were only in possession of $15,000.00. CBP officers then presented the traveler with a Fincen form in which the traveler wrote the amount of $51,000. After further inspection, CBP officers discovered additional bundles of cash inside a backpack – leading to a seizure of $72,000 in currency.

If you are ever presented with a Treasury Department Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) form, you must write down the accurate amount of currency you are carrying (including checks, money orders, foreign currency and other monetary instruments).

Violations of the reporting requirements typically lead to a seizure of the currency and may lead to involvement by HSI – resulting in your arrest. If you have had your currency seized by CBP, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.