Customs seizes undeclared currency hidden in traveler’s underwear.

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According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s media release – CBP officers at Logan International Airport in Boston questioned two Indonesian nationals arriving on a flight from Doha, Qatar.

During a more thorough secondary inspection, CBP asked the travelers to declare any currency they were carrying. The travelers declared they had approximately $12,000. However, a search of the passengers revealed $4,900 sewn into the passenger’s underwear. CBP officers also found $20,000 in US currency and $2,000 in Canadian currency among their belongings – bringing the total seizure amount to $27,000.

This incident that occurred in early November is just a portion of the over $265,000 in undeclared currency seized daily by CBP.

If you have had your currency seized by Customs at the airport while leaving or entering the US, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 for immediate assistance.

After your currency has been seized, there are certain timelines and documents that need to be filed with Customs, don’t delay.

We represent travelers locally, nationwide and world wide and will work hard to get you your money back. Call or email dhsu@givensjohnston.com today!

More invasive mitten crabs seized.

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Screen shot of seized mitten crabs – source: cbp.gov

For some reason, CBP likes to post their invasive mitten crab seizures. According to the CBP website – last Wednesday, October 31st, CBP officers found 108 Chinese mitten crabs in a package labeled as a dress.

Mitten crabs are a delicacy in Asia and typically eaten.

The mitten crabs were seized and turned over to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). The article does not say what happened to the mitten crabs.

If you have received a notice of seizure or penalty notice from Customs, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at: dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

$24,000 in unreported currency seized in Massena, NY.

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In late September, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers at the Massena Port of Entry (in New York just south of the border with Canada) seized approximately $24,000 from a Cambodian citizen entering the US.

According to the CBP media release, the traveler was taken for a secondary examination and re-questioned whether he had any currency to declare. CBP requires all currency and monetary instruments valued at $10,000 or above be declared before leaving or entering the US.

When the traveler replied no, a vehicle inspection discovered the $24,000 of currency in the center console of the car and in the waistband of the traveler. Customs seized the currency and denied admission for the traveler to enter the US.

If you or anyone you know has had their currency seized by customs at any port of entry, contact experienced customs currency and cash seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com. We can help you regardless of which city, state or country you live – call today.

 

Dulles CBP seizes $170k in unreported currency from 7 groups of travelers.

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Busy day at Dulles airport where U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized approximately $170,000 in unreported currency from 7 different travelers.

As you are aware, it is legal to carry large amounts of currency, however, all amounts over $10,000 must be reported. The $10,000 limit is not for the individual, but rather the limit for everyone in the traveling party.

The seizures in early August included:

  1. CBP seizes $21,735 from a woman boarding a flight to Belgium. The family reported $9,700.00. Typically, CBP first asks the traveler(s) to complete FinCen Form 105 to report the amount of currency they have. After the Form 105 is completed, CBP then searches the travelers’ belongings. In this instance, after the travelers signed the form, CBP did a thorough search and found $21,735 total.
  2. On July 30, a man was boarding a flight to Ghana when he CBP seized $30,721 in unreported currency.
  3. A family on the way to Turkey was detained and CBP seized $21,000 in unreported currency. In this seizure, CBP found cash concealed in clothing and cell phone cases.
  4. Another group of travelers traveling to Ghana were stopped and CBP seized $34,585 from them. The couple mistakenly reported $10,000 was carried by each person.
  5. CBP seized $18,390 from another couple going to Turkey.
  6. $20,645 was seized from another group of travelers heading to Qatar.
  7. Last, a passenger on the way to Serbia had $17,178 seized after she reported $8,000.00.

If you have had your cash seized, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

CBP seizes a combined $92K in unreported currency from 5 different foreign-bound travelers.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized nearly $91,819 from 5 different sets of travelers for violating federal reporting laws of currency in excess of $10,000 or more.

The most recently reported CBP currency seizures included:

  1. $18,171 in U.S. dollars and foreign currency from a family heading to Germany. The family reported $9,500. CBP released 700 Euros ($819 USD conversion) and 3,170 Shekels ($871 USD conversion) to the family for humanitarian purposes.
  2. CBP officers seized $22,449 in U.S. dollars and foreign currency from a man traveling to Austria. The man reported 15,000 Euros but Officers found an additional $4,957 in U.S. dollars on the man’s body and in a carry-on bag.
  3. CBP officers seized $15,650 in U.S. dollars from a woman boarding a flight to Austria Tuesday. The woman reported $9,000. Officers discovered additional currency within a purse and a carry-on bag. Officers released $650 to the woman for humanitarian purposes and released her.
  4. CBP officers seized $13,164 in U.S. dollars from two women boarding a flight to the UAE. The women reported $9,500 but officers discovered additional currency. Officers released $964 to the women for humanitarian purposes and released the women.
  5. CBP officers seized $22,385 in U.S. dollars from a family boarding a flight to Ghana. The family – husband, wife and wife’s sister – reported $5,000 and $7,000. Officers discovered additional currency in envelopes on all three persons that the man claimed to be his. Officers released $385 to the family for humanitarian purposes and released the family.

CBP reports the travelers were either citizens of the U.S., Jordan, Pakistan, or Ghana. None was arrested.

While not mentioned in the CBP release, here’s more information about currency seizures:

  1. You have to report US and foreign currency.
  2. You have to report anything you have while entering or leaving the US.
  3. If you are with your family, they will count the family as 1 person. Each individual family members do not have a $10,000. Like above, I suspect the family going to Ghana in #5 above thought the $10,000 limit was per person.
  4. Humanitarian purposes means CBP will give you some of your money if they believe you will need the money to travel to your ultimate destination.

If you or someone you know has had currency seized, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu immediately, the time is running on getting your money back. Call 832-896-6288 today or email dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

 

US Customs seizes family’s life savings.

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As has been widely reported in the news, an immigrant family in Ohio had Customs seize $58,100 of their money, an amount described as the family’s life savings.

Rustem Kazazi was headed to Albania when Customs and Border Protection stopped them at the airport and seized their cash. The cash was separated into three stacks ranging from $19,000 to $20,000 per stack.

The family is now suing CBP because they claim CBP used civil forfeiture laws to take the money without an arrest being made or charges against anyone.

Kazazi planned to spend six months in Albania and the funds were earmarked for a vacation home along the Adriatic Cost and to help extended family. The cash was also to pay living expenses while they spent 6 months back in Albania.

Will be following this and the other currency seizure involving the Texas nurse and post updates on the cases as they progress.

I’m surprised the currency was seized in Cleveland as he was supposed to take a flight to Newark, NJ before leaving from there to Albania. The currency reporting requirements are for reporting currency and or monetary instruments over $10,000 upon entering and or leaving the country. It seems in this instant case that Kazazi wasn’t leaving the country when they seized his currency, his next flight was from Ohio to Newark and then to Albania.

If you or someone you know has had a currency seizure and has any questions – contact experienced currency seizure attorney, David Hsu at 832-896-6288 at anytime or email at dhsu@givensjohnston.comm 

Cash seizures by CBP during busy Memorial Day and tips on what you need to do if you have had your cash seized.

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CBP media release noted multiple drug arrests over the Memorial Day weekend at the Buffalo area (Peace Bridge and Lewiston Ports of Entry). Most of the incidents involved travelers with illegal substances and arrests on several US travelers for outstanding warrants.

Lastly, CBP seized $20,000 in currency from a Canadian citizen for failure to report currency over $10,000.

The media release indicates CBP seized the currency and “the traveler was refused entry into the United States”.

What? At least let the guy in –

If you are ever traveling and have your currency seized, be sure to do the following:

  1. Give Customs and Border Protection your real address. They will send you a certified letter.
  2. Cooperate with Customs officials.
  3. Disclose all the money you have up front.
  4. You will be asked to sign a FinCen form, sign it only after you write down all the money you really have.

Here are some other tips:

  1. CBP will seize all currency, doesn’t matter if it is in US dollars or in currency of another country.
  2. Money orders, checks also count, it is not just cash that is counted.
  3. It doesn’t matter if you are leaving or entering the country – you have to declare the currency anytime you ENTER or LEAVE the US.
  4. Check your mail within 1-2 weeks of your currency seizure.
  5. Do not ignore the letter you will receive from Customs.
  6. Call experienced Currency Seizure attorney David Hsu immediately at 832-896-6288 or email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

CBP seizes combined $152k in unreported currency from two travelers in April 2018.

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Courtesy CBP.gov Website

According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), officers at the Philadelphia International Airport seized a combined total of 152,342 in unreported currency from two travelers departing out of who recently departed PHL.

As a general rule, travelers can carry as much currency (cash, checks, money orders, or other monetary instruments), but MUST report all amounts totaling $10,000 or more on a U.S. Department of Treasury financial form.

The first seizure took place on April 1st, where a traveler headed to Turkey was seized with $46,500 and the second seizure occurred on April 7th, where a traveler to Ghana had possessed $105,842.

If you or anyone you know has had cash seized at the airport, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com for immediate assistance.

We work hard to get your hard earned money back from Customs, don’t delay – call today!

Help! CBP seized our cash even though each of us only carried $6,000.

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We often hear from our clients that Customs seized their cash even though they were carrying less than $10,000. The typical scenario is a couple traveling overseas. The husband is carrying $6,000 in cash and the wife carries another $6,000 in cash. To most people, this appears to not violate the $10,000 reporting rule, right?

Unfortunately, it’s wrong. In the eyes of Customs, this is “structuring”. Structuring is when a person has divided more than $10,000 upon import or export of money or equivalent to avoid reporting. The law against structuring is found under 31 USC Section 5316.

We all know air travel is stressful, but next time, be sure to just report all the currency you have with you over $10,000. The cash is not taxed and reporting the money will ultimately save you time and stress. Cash seizures at airports will take several hours and you will more than likely miss your flight, or your connecting flight and the important events you have planned at your destination.

It is important to note that structuring still applies even if it is done over several days, weeks or months and structuring still applies regardless of the form of the money (whether it is in cash, travelers checks, or other monetary instruments).

So what are the penalties for currency seizures?
There are both civil and criminal penalties for structuring currency, it all depends on the circumstances of the seizure. The money can be seized, forfeited, and you may be  fined, or face additional criminal penalties if there is a pattern of illegal activity over a year long period.

Additionally, once you are in the Customs database and have a record for one currency seizure, each entry and exit to and from the US may result in heightened scrutiny from CBP.

NEED HELP?
If you or someone you know has faced a currency seizure for structuring or a cash seizure for failure to declare, contact experienced money seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.