Puerto Rico seizes counterfeit goods and currency.

patrick

Counterfeit Nike shoe, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP Officers and Import Specialist seized over 130 shipments of counterfeit goods in January – including stacks of counterfeit currency.

As usual, the counterfeit goods included watches, jewelry, bags, clothing and sunglasses featuring brands such as Nike, Pandora, LV, Gucci, D&G, Rolex, Adidas and Cartier. If authentic, the total value of the entire seized shipments is $4.2 million. An image of the seized counterfeit Nike shoes is pictured above.

The currency seizure involved a  mail package from China labeled as “cards”, but upon inspection, CBP officers found the package contained counterfeit $100 bills.

If you are an importer and have had your shipments seized, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit Goods Seizure Act of 2019.

pexels-photo-3379903

Photo by Florian Köppen on Pexels.com

In early December 2019, the Counterfeit Goods Seizure Act of 2019 was introduced in the U.S. Senate to allow U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to enforce design patents at the border.

Currently, Customs has the power to enforce only copyrights and trademarks that have been previously recorded with Customs under Section 1595a(c)(2)(C) of Title 19 of the U.S. Code.

The new bill amends amending 19 U.S.C. § 1595a(c)(2)(C) to allow Customs discretionary power to seize and detain imported goods that infringe upon a recorded U.S. design patent.

The reason for this bill is because counterfeiters are capable of producing nearly 1 to 1 replicas of goods that avoid seizure by Customs because the counterfeit goods do not include the infringing trademark.

For example, in 2018, counterfeiters imported over $70 million in fake Nike shoes similar to the Air Jordan line and avoided customs by not including the trademarked logos – not surprisingly, Nike is one prominent supporter of the new bill.

If the bill passes, future counterfeit Air Jordan shoes omitting any trademarked labels would be subject to seizure as Customs would now be able to enforce design patents.

If you have had a seizure for suspected violations of intellectual property or trademarks, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit Nike shoes seized by Customs.

shoes1

Image of the seized shoes, source: cbp.gov

According a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Mississippi seized more than $4,000 worth of counterfeit Nike Air Max, Nike Air Jordan’s, and Balenciaga shoes from Hong Kong.

The shoes were shipped in separate packages and described as “casual shoes”. Counterfeit goods entering the US are typically seized under 19 USC 1526 (e) for bearing the counterfeit trademarks.

If you or someone you know has had a shipment of good seized by Customs, there are steps you can take – contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

$2.2 million worth of fake Nike shoes seized by Customs.

Image of seized Nike shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers assigned to the port at LA/Long Beach seized over 14,806 pairs of counterfeit Nike shoes that if genuine, carry an estimated MSRP of $2,247,680.

The seizure was multi-agency and included U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents assigned at the Trade Enforcement Coordination Center (TECC). The shoes were discovered during examination of a shipment from China and were misdeclared as “napkins”.

Apparel, Footwear and Textiles Center of Excellence (AFT Center) import specialists and the trademark owner confirmed the shoes were in violation of Nike’s Air Jordan 1 Off-White, Air Jordan 12, Air Jordan 1 (blue, black, red, white), Air Jordan 11, Air Max ’97 protected designs and trademarks.

If you have had your goods seized by CBP or if they are sending you a civil penalty or you are facing criminal penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.