Givens & Johnston Secures Favorable Scope Ruling Regarding Pipe Spools.

Pipe Spools

Givens & Johnston PLLC recently secured a scope ruling excluding certain pipe spools manufactured in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) from Chinese anti-dumping duties (ADD) and countervailing duties (CVD). The exclusion covers pipe spools fabricated from non-Chinese originating pipe and pipe fittings (e.g. Japanese, Korean, U.S., etc.). In 2016, the ITA and Customs determined that all pipe spools fabricated in PRC were within the scope of the ADD & CVD orders applicable to Chinese pipe and pipe fittings as part of the ITA’s Westlake scope ruling decision.

In the Westlake case, the ITA declined to apply a substantial transformation analysis to the fabrication of pipe spools. Instead, the ITA used a mixed media analysis that looked at the components individually rather than as part of a whole. In Westlake, the ITA held that the pipe and pipe fittings fabricated into a pipe spool continue to have the same characteristics of pipe, so the ITA continued to treat them as pipe for ADD & CVD purposes. More recently, the ITA used the same method of analysis, except determined that because the non-Chinese origin pipe spool components were not subject to Chinese ADD & CVD, the fabrication into pipe spools did not change this result.

The full text of the scope ruling can be found here.

This ruling is crucial to companies who fabricate goods in the PRC from non-Chinese originating components and to any importers interested in importing pipe spools that are not subject to Chinese ADD & CVD. If you have any questions regarding how this ruling may affect you or your business, please give Givens & Johnston a call:

950 Echo Lane, Suite 360
Houston, Texas 77024
Phone: (713) 932-1540
Fax: (713) 932-1542

Potential Expansion of ADD/CVD Orders for Seamless Pipe from China to Include Pipe Rack Modules.

Seamless Pipe

On April 6, 2017, the ITA posted a scope ruling request filed by United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (“USW”) attempting to extend the existing ADD & CVD cases against seamless pipe from China to include pipe rack modules. The 2016 Westlake scope ruling extended existing ADD & CVD cases against various types of pipe from China to include pipe spools, and the new request cites to Westlake extensively. If this case is successful, CBP will most likely apply it to more than just modules fabricated seamless pipe from China but to any pipe subject to an ADD or CVD case.

Givens & Johnston is currently pursuing multiple scope rulings clarifying Westlake pipe spool rulings and can provide immediate consultations about how importers and producers might respond.

Now is the time to get involved! Importers and producers can more easily impact or derail the scope rulings before a bad ruling is issued.

Please call David Hsu (713.932.1540) if you have any questions or would like more information.

What happens after a Customs currency seizure?

Currency Seizure 02

In my blog post yesterday, I discussed what happens after a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“Customs”) seizure of items and merchandise. Today’s post is along the same line but will focus instead on currency (cash) seizures by Customs.

Most of our clients report seizures of currency and cash while they are either entering or exiting an airport or at a border crossing. At the time of seizure, Customs will give you a receipt of the seizure. This is form 6051S and is officially known as the “Custody Receipt for Seized Property and Evidence”. It is important to keep this receipt as it will contain the identification number of your seizure for tracking purposes and is your only proof of the money seizure. If you do receive this form, be sure it is properly filled out and contains how much money was seized, the officer seizing the property, and contact information.

Following the seizure, Customs must send you a CAFRA Notice of Seizure that further details the seizure (why it was seized, date, location seized, and additional facts). You will get the seizure notice in the mail and it will be sent certified mail (you sign the green card, or you will receive a notice to pick up the certified mail letter at your local post office).

Once you receive the notice, you have to respond by 30 days from the date of the notice (not the day you physically receive the notice).

Your response to the seizure notice requires you to complete an “Election of Proceedings” form that will be included with the seizure notice. Customs will not easily return your seized currency and there are many nuances involved – contact me for a free consultation regarding your currency seizure.