US China exchange good will measures prior to next trade talks.

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US and China will send mid-level negotiators to meet in a few weeks prior to higher level talks afterwards. In advance of the meetings, both sides have displayed signs of good will – for example, the US rescheduled the proposed October 1st deadline for new tariffs to take effect to October 15th, as October 1st is the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC).
China on the other hand, has indicated their importers are looking to increase purchases of American agricultural products such as soybeans, pork and other farm goods.
US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has indicated the talks will occur sometime in October. I don’t believe an agreement can be reached – the US is using trade as a leverage against China’s ambitions to be the world leader in robotics, artificial intelligence and high tech industries (2025), along with allegations of steal trade secrets and forcing foreign firms to participate in joint ventures with required tech transfers.
If you have any questions about how the current 232 or 301 duties will impact your business, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China reduces penalties for importation of unapproved drugs – improving access for its citizens.

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In late August, the Chinese government said they would reduce the penalties for the sale and import of unapproved drugs, thereby improving access to cheaper generic pharmaceuticals from other countries. This action was taken to allow greater affordable drugs for chronic diseases increasingly impacting the Chinese population.

The reduction in penalties is set to take effect on December 1st. Current penalties for people selling drugs that are not approved by the National Medical Products Administration could result in a fine and criminal prosecution with jail sentences up to 3 years.

For example, under the new law, cheaper generic drugs made outside of China could be imported and sold in China. One drug cited in the article was the Indian version of the lung-cancer drug Iressa cost $10 a day in 2016, compared with $100 a day for the patented drug in China. He said generic drugs cost, on average, 97 percent less than patented drugs sold in China.

If you want to be sure you are compliance with US FDA regulations, contact experienced compliance attorney David Hsu by phone or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US and China trade talks to resume in October.

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The office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) confirmed on Thursday that a deputy-level meeting would be held in mid-September to discuss plans for trade talks in October.
This past Sunday, new tariffs on US$125 billion of Chinese imports, including shoes and smartwatches, came into effect after President Trump said he was disappointed in China’s lack of effort to buy US farm goods. In return, China responded with duties on $75 billion of American goods, affecting crude oil exported from the US.
The agreed to talks in October will hopefully resolve the 13-month trade war between the two countries.
If you have any questions how your company may be impacted by the US/China trade war – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

USTR to open comment period on List 4.

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This past Thursday, the US Trade Representative (USTR) gave formal notice of the plan to raise tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese imports from 10% to 15% starting December 15th. The formal notice starts the opportunity for importers or anyone impacted by the potential tariffs to submit comments. The comments are an opportunity for businesses to tell the White House why the tariffs are good or bad. As in the past, comments have been both supportive and critical of the potential tariffs.
This round of tariffs encompasses goods on “List 4” and includes mostly consumer goods – such as smartphones, computers, and other consumer electronics.
If you want to submit comments regarding any goods on “List 4”, contact experienced trade and customs attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China threatens retaliation if India bans Huawei.

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According to a Reuters article, China has warned India not to block Huawei from doing business in the country, warning there could be consequences for Indian firms operating in China.

Part of the warning comes as India is holding trials for a 5G networking in the upcoming months and has not yet determined whether they will invite Huawei to take part in the rollout of 5G in India.

The Reuters article says Indian companies do not have a larger presence in China, but do have manufacturing, healthcare, financial services and outsourcing companies there.

India is currently evaluating bids from 5G firms such as Ericcson, Nokia, Samsung and officials have not yet confirmed Huawei will take part. The Indian Department of Telecommunications have found no evidence of Huawei capabilities of a backdoor or malware to collect data and the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs has issued no directive to curtail Huawei’s entry.

Trump delays List 4 tariffs until December 14th.

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The Trump administration has postponed the levying of 10% tariffs on List 4 goods covering $300 billion in imports from China until December 15th. The initial date of September 1st was postponed after reports of a phone call with Beijing.

A new round of trade talks will be held in September after this month’s talks did not result in a trade deal.

There is still time to lower your import risk, if you would like solutions to lowering the duties you need to pay, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Commerce issues affirmative preliminary determination in CVD investigation of wooden cabinets and vanities.

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The U.S. Department of Commerce has issued affirmative preliminary determination CVD investigation of wooden cabinets and vanities from China, finding that exporters received countervailable subsidies ranging from 10.97 to 229.24 percent.
As such, Commerce will instruct CBP to start collecting cash deposits from importers of wooden cabinets and vanities from China. Last year, imports of wooden cabinets and vanities from China were valued at an estimated $4.4 billion. The final CVD determination is expected to be on or about December 17, 2019. A final injury determination will then be announced on January 30, 2020.
The announcement and preliminary rates can be found here.
If you have any questions about importing wooden cabinets and vanities, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

US collected $63 billion in tariffs through June.

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According to the Wall Street Journal, the Treasury department’s tariffs is expected to generate almost $72 billion in tariffs through June of this year. This number will likely go much higher if the “List 4” duties take effect on September 1st. On September 1st, over $300 billion in Chinese goods will be subject to a 10% tariff with a potential to increase to 25%.

Specifically, as of June 30th, the Treasury department has collected $63 billion in tariffs over the past 12 months. In contrast, prior to the trade war, the US only brought in $30 billion dollars.

The WSJ estimates the annual generated amount can be as high as $100 billion by the end of the year once the 10% duties are placed on over $300 billion worth of imported goods from China.

If you have any questions how the current 301 duties or proposed List 4 duties will impact you, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China currency move believed to be in response to tariff threat.

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According to the Washington Post, China let the exchange rate for the yuan to fall below seven per dollar. A weak Chinese currency has the effect of increasing the country’s exports, hurting foreign competitors.

The WP further quotes People’s Bank of China blaming the decline on “trade protectionism,” a reference to the ongoing trade dispute between the US and China. The remainder of the article lists the various markets world wide and the subsequent decline since China’s announcement.

As previously blogged, China will take other measures in response to the trade war besides imposing their own duties on US imports. China has currently imposed duties covering 110 billion US goods, and can only impose an additional duty on $50 billion before China covers all of the $160 billion in US goods last year.

 

I want to file a 301 exclusion – what info do I need to provide the USTR?

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As you are aware, the exclusion process for List 3 is now openuntil September. We have received a lot of exclusion requests and I thought I’d share the information the US Trade Representative (USTR) requires in order to review an exclusion request:

1. 10-digit subheading of the HTSUS applicable, use 8/10 digits (if there are different HTSUS 8 and 10 digit codes used, we will need a separate request)

2. Product name

3. Detailed description of the product: (1) physical characteristics (e.g., dimensions, weight, material composition, etc.). (2) Requestors may submit a
range of comparable goods within the product definition set out in an exclusion request. Thus, a product request may include two or more goods with
similar product characteristics or attributes. Goods with different SKUs, model numbers, or sizes are not necessarily different products.

4. The products function, application (whether the product is designed to function in or with a particular machine or other device), principal use, and any
unique physical features that distinguish it from other products within the covered 8-digit HTSUS subheading. Requestors may submit attachments that
help distinguish the product (e.g., CBP rulings, photos and specification sheets, and previous import documentation). Documents submitted to support a
Requestor’s product description must be made available for public inspection and contain no BCI. USTR will not consider requests that identify the
product using criteria that cannot be made available for public inspection.

5. Requestors must provide their relationship to the product (Importer, U.S. Producer, Purchaser, Industry Association, Other) and provide specific data
on the annual quantity and value of the Chinese-origin product, domestic product, and third-country product the Requestor purchased, in 2017, 2018,
and the first quarter of 2019.

6. Requestors must provide information regarding their company’s gross revenues for 2018, the first quarter of 2018, and the first quarter of 2019.

7 For imports sold as final products, Requestors must provide the percentage of their total gross sales in 2018 that sales of the Chinese-origin product
accounted for.

8. For imports used in the production of final products, Requestors must provide the percentage of the total cost of producing the final product(s) the
Chinese-origin input accounts for and the percentage of their total gross sales in 2018 that sales of the final product(s) accounted for. Required
information regarding the Requestor’s purchases and gross sales and revenue is BCI and the information entered will not be publicly viewable.

9. Whether the particular product is available only from China and whether the particular product and/or a comparable product is available from sources
in the United States and/or in third countries. The Requestor must provide an explanation if the product is not available outside of China or the Requestor
is not sure of the product availability.

10. Whether the Requestor has attempted to source the product from the United States or third countries.

11. Whether the imposition of additional duties (since September 2018) on the particular product has or will cause severe economic harm to the
Requestor or other U.S. interests.

12. Whether the particular product is strategically important or related to “Made in China 2025” or other Chinese industrial programs.

If you have any questions about the exclusion request process, contact experienced attorney trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com.