Unauthorized COVID medicine seized.

COVID-19 treatment bills – source: CBP.gov

Since July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers in Seattle have seized 8 shipments totaling over 2,400 pills of unauthorized influenza treatments for COVID-19. Working with the FDA, CBP prevents unauthorized medicines that may mislead consumers by falsely claiming to treat or prevent diseases.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs and want to explore your options contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Prescription medication seized by CBP.

Image of seized medication, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Indianapolis seized multiple shipments of Zolpidem, 10 milligram tablets, a schedule IV controlled substance used as a sedative.

The packages were sent from the United Kingdom and headed to separate addresses in the US. The shipments were arriving from the United Kingdom and were all headed to separate addresses. The shipper hid the Zolpidem in coffee tins.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs and want to explore your options, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Unapproved and counterfeit goods seized by Customs.

Counterfeit COVID medications, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Baltimore seized unapproved COVID-19 medications, facemasks and test kits earlier this month.

The seized goods included 1,200 pills of COVID medicines, including Hydroxycholorquine sulfate, 2,000 pills of various anti-COVID drugs not approved by the FDA, and 100 unapproved test kids. Besides unapproved drugs and test kits, CBP also seized face masks with registered trademarked logos such as Nike, Adidas, Fila and even Manchester City football club.

This most recent seizure is just one of many seizures of test kits, diagnostic kits, respirators and even unapproved face masks.

If your goods have been seized by Customs, contact customs attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes 15,000+ Xanax pills destined for Texas.

Seized Xanax pills, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Cincinnati seized a shipment of approximately 15,750 Xanax pills June 30th. The shipment was from Britain and opened for further examination due to x-ray anomalies as a result of a foil lined box. Upon opening the box, they found 63 bottles marked “Xanax XR 2mg”, if authentic, the Xanax pills would have totaled over $230,000.

As you are aware, Xanax is used for the treatment of anxiety and classified as a Schedule IV controlled substance and cannot be shipped to the US without a prescription from a physician. The shipment was addressed to a residence in Texas.

Author’s notes – usually there’s something to do for a seizure from Customs; however in situations where a schedule 4 controlled substance is shipped to an individual in a box meant to hide the contents from x-ray scanners and mailed without a physician’s prescription – there’s probably not much I can do to assist.

The lesson here is to not even take the risk to try and import drugs, especially controlled substances to the US. CBP may refer your case to Homeland Security Investigations and will likely also issue you a civil penalty.

Have you had your good seized? Contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com for a free consultation.

Kratom contaminated with salmonella seized by CBP.

Image of kratom powder, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Detroit seized more than a half ton of “salmonella-laced Kratom” at the Fort Street Cargo Facility.

Author’s comment: the original headline was “CBP Seizes Half Ton of Salmonella-Laced Kratom“. Not sure why they used the word “laced” in the headline as lacing something is typically used to mean adding an ingredient to bulk up a drug. I am unsure how a kratom exporter can “lace” kratom with salmonella on purpose or if there would be a benefit to doing so. Additionally, the use of the word “lace” to describe kratom may also be an effort to associate kratom as dangerous as other illegal drugs that are frequently laced such as crack, heroin, PCP, etc.

The media release reports 1,200 pounds of contaminated powder (valued according to CBP at $405,000) was selected for further inspection due to an unusual description and classification discrepancies.

CBP said the kratom “which originated from China, were manifested as botanical soils from Canada, though Officers and specialists believed it to be consistent in appearance to bulk green tea”.

Author’s comment: this is the first time I have heard of kratom from China, maybe it was transhipped from Indonesia? CBP did not indicate the “classification discrepancy” or point out what HTSUS code was used to enter the kratom.

CBP took a sample of the power and sent it to the Food and Drug Administration for lab tests – which confirmed the shipment was kratom but also saw it was contaminated with salmonella. As a result, CBP seized the shipment “due to significant risk to public health and safety”.

Author’s comment: CBP does not specify the import alert on kratom as the basis for seizure. I have not seen the seizure notice (it will only be sent to the importer of record), but it was likely seized for not being described as kratom on the shipping documents.

In the last paragraph of the CBP media release, they write:

Kratom is a tropical tree native to Southeast Asia, and its leaves are often ingested in the form of tea. Depending on dosage, Kratom can produce both stimulant and sedative effects. Kratom is not a scheduled substance under the Controlled Substances Act, though the Drug Enforcement Administration currently lists it as a Drug or Chemical of Concern.

It is interesting they do not mention the 2016 import alert regarding kratom. If you have had your shipment of kratom (mitragyna speciosa) seized by CBP, contact David Hsu, 24/7 by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Birmingham CBP seizes unapproved thermometers.

Image of seized thermometers, source: CBP.gov

CBP officers in Birmmingham seized 500 unregistered non-contact and infrared thermometers with country of origin as Malaysia or China. If genuine articles, the value of the shipment would have totaled $21,400.

The thermometers did contain the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) markings on the packaging and the devices, but the shipment was still seized as the shipping company was not registered with the FDA when the thermometers were imported. The registration of the shipping company is required as part of the pre-market notification process under section 510(k) of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

According to CBP, so far this year they have seized 107,000 illegal COVID-19 test kits, 11,000 doses of chloroquine and more than 750,000 counterfeit masks. Given the current increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations, CBP will likely be seizing more thermometers, face masks and chloroquine in the near future.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact seizure attorney David Hsu to discuss your options anytime by mobile phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Unauthorized COVID-19 medicine seized.

Seized COVID-19 medicine, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized 360 pills of medicine marketed to treating COVID-19. The medicine was a violation of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rules preventing unauthorized medical treatments that may mislead consumers by making false claims to prevent or treat diseases or may in fact harm the consumer.

The FDA is especially concerned with unauthorized COVID-19 treatments that are marketed towards curing, treating or preventing serious illnesses.

If you have had your good seized by Customs, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit protective equipment and medications.

HAR COVID Rx6L 042120

Image of seized medication, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seize shipments of counterfeit personal protective equipment (PPE) and medications to treat the corona virus.

Since late March and the height of the corona virus panemdic, CBP has seized, including but not limited to:

-1,200 “Linhua Qingwen” capsules that are not approved by the FDA for medicine in treatment of COVID-19.
-1,350 counterfeit test kits
-400 counterfeit N95 masks
-2,500 possibly counterfeit medicine such as Hydroxychloroquine Sulfate, Chloroquine, Azithromycin, Lianhua Qingwen and Liushen Jiaonang; and
-67,000 counterfeit ACCU-CHEK test strips.

If you have questions about your shipment seized by Customs and you want a free, no cost or obligation consultation, contact by phone/text David Hsu at anytime: 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

IAD 354 COVID Masks2L 040320

Image of seized masks, source: cbp.gov

Fake Cialis and Viagra Pills Seized by CBP.

Counterfiet Cialis 1

Counterfeit medication from Turkey; source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Kentucky seized counterfeit Cialis and Viagra pills in Kentucky. The shipment from Turkey was destined to a city in California and labeled as “throat lozenges and candies”. However, CBP’s experienced officers looked at the totality of the circumstances and determined the route of the shipment and the packaging of the pills were indicative of being counterfeit pills.

Customs warns consumers of the dangers of buying counter medicines – which may have the incorrect or harmful ingredients.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

More counterfeit COVID-19 test kits seized.

Test Kit 1

Image of seized COVID-19 test kit, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in New Jersey seized another shipment containing counterfeit COVID-19 test kits. A secondary inspection of the shipment discovered 25 COVID-19 test kits not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This seizure was just 25 out of the 600 COVID test kits seized at the Rochester airport.

All imported test kits are presumed to lack FDA approval as the FDA has only allowed 50 companies to develop and distribute the COVID test kits and the companies that manufactured the seized test kits have not been approved.

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My guess for the large number of imports and seizures of the test kits are due to family members overseas sending kits to their family in the US who want to be sure they do not have the virus and pass on to older family members.

If you have had your good seized by customs and want to know what you can do next, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.