Baltimore CBP stops Asian Gypsy Moths from entering US.

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CBP agriculture specialists removing egg mass, source: cbp.gov

Last week, CBP agriculture specialists at the Port of Baltimore detected over 120 egg masses across 4 different ships.
The Asian Gypsy Moth or AGM for short is a destructive invasive insect pests that is not typically found in the United States. CBP agriculture specialists at Baltimore have intercepted over 120 of the AGM egg masses since July of this year.
The AGM, scientifically known as the Lymantria dispar asiatica/japonica, pose a significant threat to the national forests and urban landscape because they are very mobile and can travel up to 25 miles per day- laying egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars.
If you have had a shipment seized, detained or requiring re-export for fumigation – call experienced pest and invasive species attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com – there may be some other options available besides re-export. Time is of the essence in bug cases so call now!

US China exchange good will measures prior to next trade talks.

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Photo by Manuel Joseph on Pexels.com

US and China will send mid-level negotiators to meet in a few weeks prior to higher level talks afterwards. In advance of the meetings, both sides have displayed signs of good will – for example, the US rescheduled the proposed October 1st deadline for new tariffs to take effect to October 15th, as October 1st is the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC).
China on the other hand, has indicated their importers are looking to increase purchases of American agricultural products such as soybeans, pork and other farm goods.
US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has indicated the talks will occur sometime in October. I don’t believe an agreement can be reached – the US is using trade as a leverage against China’s ambitions to be the world leader in robotics, artificial intelligence and high tech industries (2025), along with allegations of steal trade secrets and forcing foreign firms to participate in joint ventures with required tech transfers.
If you have any questions about how the current 232 or 301 duties will impact your business, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake NBA championship rings worth $560,000 seized by Customs.

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Image of counterfeit NBA rings, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release – officers assigned at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) seized 28 counterfeit NBA rings with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $560,000.

According to the media release, the rings were shipped from China and packaged in a wooden box to be sold as a collection of championship rings from multiple teams – including the Cavaliers, Lakers, Bulls, etc.

When CBP suspects items are counterfeit, they will take photos or send samples to the  Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Center of Excellence (CPMM Center) for a final determination regarding the authenticity of the items. If they are determined to be counterfeit, CBP will seize the goods and issue a seizure notice to the importer of record (in this instance, it is a not a formal entry – so the notice would be shipped to the person receiving the goods).

If you have had your goods seized by CBP, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit goods seized at Kentucky World Fest.

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Counterfeit goods seized at 2019 WorldFest. (Source: Louisville Metro Alcoholic Beverages Licences)

According to WDRB, a local station in Louisville, Kentucky – an investigation funded by a 2-year, $25,000 federal grant from the US Department of Justice resulted in the seizure of more than $1 million worth of counterfeit goods from this past weekend’s WorldFest.

The article did not specify the brands that were seized, but did mention the counterfeit items included purses and sunglasses. Two men, 59-year-old Kassoum Thiam and 52-year-old Saidou Djau were cited for selling counterfeit merchandise at five separate booths.

While this was not a customs seizure, I’m pretty sure the next step for investigators is coordinate with CBP to determine how or where the two men received the merchandise.

If you or anyone you know is facing accusations of importing counterfeit merchandise or have had items seized by Customs for suspicion of being counterfeit – contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Newest Huawei P30 smartphone ships with Google Android 10.

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Photo by Tyler Lastovich on Pexels.com

Despite a current ban on US companies from supplying technology to Huawei, the new P30 Pro features a 6.47 inch display, 4 cameras and Google’s  Android 10 (Android 9 “Pie”was the last Android version to be released with a name associated with a confectionary food).
While Google was exempt from export restrictions imposed against Huawei and the supplying of software for new products. Future Huawei smartphones such as the 5G Mate 30 Pro may include the Huawei developed Harmony OS.
If your company does business with Huawei and you want to be sure you are in compliance, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China reduces penalties for importation of unapproved drugs – improving access for its citizens.

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In late August, the Chinese government said they would reduce the penalties for the sale and import of unapproved drugs, thereby improving access to cheaper generic pharmaceuticals from other countries. This action was taken to allow greater affordable drugs for chronic diseases increasingly impacting the Chinese population.

The reduction in penalties is set to take effect on December 1st. Current penalties for people selling drugs that are not approved by the National Medical Products Administration could result in a fine and criminal prosecution with jail sentences up to 3 years.

For example, under the new law, cheaper generic drugs made outside of China could be imported and sold in China. One drug cited in the article was the Indian version of the lung-cancer drug Iressa cost $10 a day in 2016, compared with $100 a day for the patented drug in China. He said generic drugs cost, on average, 97 percent less than patented drugs sold in China.

If you want to be sure you are compliance with US FDA regulations, contact experienced compliance attorney David Hsu by phone or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Post Brexit US, Britain trade deal?

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According to the Associated Press, at last week’s visit to London, Vice President Pence indicated to Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson that President Trump would be eager to reach a new trade deal with the UK once the UK leaves the European Union with the AP quoting Vice President Pence: “The minute the U.K. is out, America is in”.
While the US may be eager to join a trade deal, the AP cited British officials who are hesitant to entering into any deals that may favor the US. For example, the EU agriculture policy benefits British farmers, and any trade deal will include US demands for more access for agricultural products.
Another trade issue that will arise post-Brexit is between the UK and Ireland. With the
UK and Ireland belonging to the EU, free trade of people and goods has moved across the border with no problem. However, post-Brexit, this may complicate a new trade deal with the UK. In 2018, the UK was America’s 4th biggest export market with a US trade surplus of $18.6 billion.

Potential US Japan deal looks to boost US agriculture exports.

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As promised during his campaign, President Trump withdrew the US from the Trans Pacific Partnership – leaving Canada, Mexico and Australia as the major players; opting instead to enter into bilateral agreements with individual countries.
After the TPP took effect this January, US farm exports to Japan dropped by 2% for the first half of the year, with a projected annual net farm income loss of $4.4 billion annually. This could be due to US exports of beef to Japan now subject to a 38.5% duty, ground pork at 20% and some cheeses at 40%. The lack of a trade deal has also impacted
Japan’s exporters of steel and aluminum to the US. The President has previously threatened Japan with duties on auto imports.
The US and Japan have reached an agreement in principle expect to make the trade deal official in the upcoming months.

US and China trade talks to resume in October.

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Photo by Frans Van Heerden on Pexels.com

The office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) confirmed on Thursday that a deputy-level meeting would be held in mid-September to discuss plans for trade talks in October.
This past Sunday, new tariffs on US$125 billion of Chinese imports, including shoes and smartwatches, came into effect after President Trump said he was disappointed in China’s lack of effort to buy US farm goods. In return, China responded with duties on $75 billion of American goods, affecting crude oil exported from the US.
The agreed to talks in October will hopefully resolve the 13-month trade war between the two countries.
If you have any questions how your company may be impacted by the US/China trade war – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP finds rare first-in-nation pest in importation of corn.

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A specimen of Cratosomus punctulatus
Gyllenhal
, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Brownsville, Texas intercepted a rare “First in Nation” pest in a shipment of corn.  The interception of the pest occurred at the Los Indios International Bridge import lot in a shipment of fresh corn from Mexico.
When the corn was inspected, CBP officers found the pest and submitted it to a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist. The initial identification was later confirmed by a national specialist as Cratosomus punctulatus Gyllenhal (Curculionidae) a pest not known to occur in the United States and intercepted for the first time in the nation.
This is a type of snout weevil that are plant feeders and many weeevils are pests of agricultural crops and forests.
If you have had your shipment seized due to pests or other invasive species, there may be some alternatives besides the ones given to you by Customs – contact experienced wood packing material and pest seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.