CBP intercepts destructive long-horned beetles.

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Spondylindinae (Cerambycidae) larvae, source: CBP.gov

According to a CBP media release, CBP Officers in Baltimore intercepted the long-horned beetle larvae species known as Spondylidinae (Cerambycidae). According to Customs, the Long-horned beetle larvae are voracious wood borers that can cause extensive damage to living trees or untreated lumber.
After discovering the larvae, CBP issued an EAN (Emergency Action Notification) requiring the importer to re-export the shipment. Additionally from our experience, CBP will also issue a civil penalty for non-compliant wood packaging material.
This seizure in Baltimore is just a typical day for CBP, where CBP agriculture specialists across the nation seize approximately 4,552 prohibited plant, meat, animal byproduct, and soil, and intercepted 319 insect pests at U.S. ports of entry per day.
If you have had a wood packaging material penalty notice, or have received an Emergency Action Notification, contact experienced customs attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by  email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes prohibited fertilizer from Mexico.

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Bottle of seized fertilizer, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Baltimore along with agriculture specialists detained two travelers from California carrying a bottle of what was declared as “organic liquid fertilizer” containing soil, compost, ashes and cattle manure.
As soil may contain invasive pests and other items such as weed seeds and fungal and bacterial diseases, US agriculture specialists tested the fertilizer. Since cattle manure poses an agriculture threat for cattle diseases, it is not allowed entry into the US unless an import permit and certificate the manure was properly treated.
If you have had a customs or CBP seizure and want your items back, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Customs seizes more than $400k in fake luxury watches.

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Counterfeit watches, source: CBP.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Philadelphia seized 38 designer brand watches that, if authentic, would have had a manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of $412,750. Instead, they’re headed to destruction.
The shipment from Hong Kong was labeled as containing “Lithium Ion Batteries in CO”, upon further inspection, CBP found counterfeit watches bearing the Rolex, Invicta, Rado and Hublot luxury brand names. CBP also enlisted the efforts of the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandise Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) for verification with the trade mark holders.
If you have had your shipment seized for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced customs seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or dj@gjatradelaw.com.

$2.2 million worth of fake Nike shoes seized by Customs.

Image of seized Nike shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers assigned to the port at LA/Long Beach seized over 14,806 pairs of counterfeit Nike shoes that if genuine, carry an estimated MSRP of $2,247,680.

The seizure was multi-agency and included U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents assigned at the Trade Enforcement Coordination Center (TECC). The shoes were discovered during examination of a shipment from China and were misdeclared as “napkins”.

Apparel, Footwear and Textiles Center of Excellence (AFT Center) import specialists and the trademark owner confirmed the shoes were in violation of Nike’s Air Jordan 1 Off-White, Air Jordan 12, Air Jordan 1 (blue, black, red, white), Air Jordan 11, Air Max ’97 protected designs and trademarks.

If you have had your goods seized by CBP or if they are sending you a civil penalty or you are facing criminal penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Agriculture Specialists in Texas find first discovery of pest in the US.

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Dysschema mariamne Warren (Erebidae), source: CBP

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, agriculture specialists at the Pharr, Texas Port of Entry discovered a rare pest, a first in nation discovery, in a shipment of prickly pear pads.

Specifically, CBP agents found the Dysschema mariamne Warren (Erebidae), a first in nation pest.

The Erebidae was discovered upon an inspection of shipment of pear pads from Mexico. After it was discovered, the U.S. Department of Agriculture entomology laboratory was consulted and the initial identification was later confirmed by a national specialist as Dysschema mariamne Warren (Erebidae). According to USDA entomologists, this pest has never been found at any of the nation’s ports of entry. CBP refused entry to the shipment and returned it back to Mexico.

If you have had a shipment detained by Customs for containing invasive species, or have had a shipment detained due to pests found in wood packaging materials – contact experienced customs seizure and detention attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

5,200 counterfeit refrigerator water filters seized.

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Image of seized water filters, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at LA/Long Beach port seized 5,202 counterfeit refrigerator water filters that if genuine would have an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $224,202.

The counterfeit filters contained trademarks registered by Brita, GE, Frigidaire, PUR and NSF Certification. As you are aware, trademark owners can register their trademark and CBP will seize infringing use of such trademarks.

The filters were shipped from China and were to be delivered to an address in Washington.

If you or anyone you know has had a shipment seized for suspected infringement of trademarks, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake NBA championship rings worth $560,000 seized by Customs.

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Image of counterfeit NBA rings, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release – officers assigned at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) seized 28 counterfeit NBA rings with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $560,000.

According to the media release, the rings were shipped from China and packaged in a wooden box to be sold as a collection of championship rings from multiple teams – including the Cavaliers, Lakers, Bulls, etc.

When CBP suspects items are counterfeit, they will take photos or send samples to the  Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Center of Excellence (CPMM Center) for a final determination regarding the authenticity of the items. If they are determined to be counterfeit, CBP will seize the goods and issue a seizure notice to the importer of record (in this instance, it is a not a formal entry – so the notice would be shipped to the person receiving the goods).

If you have had your goods seized by CBP, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit goods seized at Kentucky World Fest.

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Counterfeit goods seized at 2019 WorldFest. (Source: Louisville Metro Alcoholic Beverages Licences)

According to WDRB, a local station in Louisville, Kentucky – an investigation funded by a 2-year, $25,000 federal grant from the US Department of Justice resulted in the seizure of more than $1 million worth of counterfeit goods from this past weekend’s WorldFest.

The article did not specify the brands that were seized, but did mention the counterfeit items included purses and sunglasses. Two men, 59-year-old Kassoum Thiam and 52-year-old Saidou Djau were cited for selling counterfeit merchandise at five separate booths.

While this was not a customs seizure, I’m pretty sure the next step for investigators is coordinate with CBP to determine how or where the two men received the merchandise.

If you or anyone you know is facing accusations of importing counterfeit merchandise or have had items seized by Customs for suspicion of being counterfeit – contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit electronic door locks.

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Image of seized counterfeit locks, source: cbp.gov

According to a US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers inspected a rail container and discovered electronic locks in violation of intellectual property rights (IPR) regulations. The seizure consister of 3,856 counterfeit locks with an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $760,841 if the goods had been genuine.

The counterfeit locks are the Lockly brand and typically retail for about $279.99 each.

The remainder of the press releases explained that illicit goods damage the US economy and threaten the health and safety of Americans.

If you have had your imports seized by Customs, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu – we can help fight to get your imports back – call 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

CBP posts their 2018 intellectual property rights seizure statistics.

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Seized Asus and LG Phones. Source: cbp.gov

Earlier this month, U.S. Customs and Border Protection posted their 2018 intellectual property rights statistics. The annual report lists statistics for the products that infringe upon US trademark and copy rights or othersize subject to exclusion orders involving various agencies such as CBP, ICE, and HSI.
Here’s a summary:
1. How much product comes into the US? 11 million containers by sea, 10 million containers by truck, 3 million by rail and 250,000,000 by cargo/postal/express pacakages through the air.
2. 33,810 total seizures (333 less than FY 2017’s 34,143).
3. Total MSRP of seized goods 1.4 billion (1.2 billion in FY 2017).
4. ICE-HSI arrested 381 people, obtained 296 indictments, 260 convictions.
5. CBP’s Integrated Trade Targeting Networking (ITTN) conducted over 120 operations and seized 4,891 shipments of IPR-infringing goods with a total MSRP of $94 million.
6. Investigations by CBP’s Center of Excellence and Expertise totaled 24, with a MSRP of seized goods totaling over $11.5 million.
7. The “Truth Behind Counterfeits” public awareness campaign to educate the public on the negative impacts of counterfeit products included major billboards at airports and online ads on travel websites – it is estimated the campaign generated over 200 million views.
8. In 2018, CBP enforced over 17,641 active trademark and copyright recordations, including 2,289 new recordations and 812 renewals of expiring recordations.
9. There were over 161 million express shipments and 475 million shipped through international mail.
10. Over 90% of all IPR violations occurred among the international mail and express environments.
11. 18% of all seizures were wearing apparel/accessories, footwear came in number 2 at 14%.
12. Counterfeit watches and jewelry was the most seized product, totaling 44% of all seizures with a MSRP almost $618 million.
13. China was the number one trading partner with the most seized goods at 54% of the total number of seized goods.
The full report can be downloaded here:
If you have received a letter from Customs for alleged intellectual property rights violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu on his cell at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.