CBP stops invasive Scarab beetle pests from entering the US.

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Scarab beetle, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists in Florida stopped several invasive pests from entering the US – specifically the scarab beetle and heteroptera. The scarab beetle can infest and destroy crops while the heteroptera is known to damage plant roots.

According to the CBP media release, agriculture specialists in 2018 seized on average 319 pests at U.S. ports of entry and 4,552 materials for quarantine: plant, meat, animal byproduct and soil each day!

If you have had a Customs seizure due to an infestation of pests or wood-boring insects in wooden packaging materials – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Importer Alert – CBP enforcing wood packaging material regulations.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers along with U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) officers in Houston are strictly enforcing the USDA’s prohibition of non compliant wood packaging material (WPM).

Non compliant materials are typically ordered for immediate exportation along with any associated cargo in the same bill of lading. CBP and USDA officers typically find WPM non compliant if evidence of prohibited live insects is found during inspection. If any invasive species such as a wood boring wasp or other insects and larvae are found during inspection, CBP/USDA will issue an Emergency Action Notice ordering the cargo to typically be exported in 7 days for repackaging and/or fumigation.

A finding of noncompliance will have a detrimental impact on shippers, importers, consignees and the resulting delay in reexportation can cause major problems for time sensitive project cargo.

If you or someone  you know has had a WPM issue with the presence of larvae or living insects or if you  have received an emergency action notice – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at: attorney.dave@yahoo.com

CBP stops harmful Asian Gypsy Moth found aboard a vessel.

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In late April, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists stopped the importation of viable eggs of the Asian Gypsy Moth found aboard a vessel

Once the vessel arrived at the port, CBP agriculture specialists found egg masses which they suspect were to be the Asian Gypsy moth.

The Asian gypsy moth is harmful to US vegetation because it feed on trees and plants. The danger is further highlighted by the fact a female gypsy moth can lay hundreds of eggs that develop into caterpillars.

If you have had a vessel detained by CBP and received a notice from CBP regarding pests – contact experienced customs attorney, David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Emergency Action Notice for Wood Packaging Materials – Increased CBP Enforcement!

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Since late 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection has increased their enforcement of regulations surrounding the use of Wood Packaging Materials (WPM) in shipments entering the US.

In a September 25, 2017 message, CBP began imposing penalties for a 1st violation of the WPM regulations (7 C.F.R. 319.40 – 3). This news is significant as penalties under 19 U.S.C. 1595a or 1592 can be enormous. In addition to these penalties, monetary loss also results from from having to export entire shiploads of cargo, even when just a small portion of it is in violation. Frequent violations in the WPM regulations are regarding improper markings or pests. CBP will always inspect shipments containing WPM for a proper mark and the presence of any invasive pests.

There is a lot of plant construction underway along the Gulf coast. Shiploads of wood packaged steel structures have been halted by Customs at the port and directed to immediately export.

The first indication of a problem is if you receive an “Emergency Action Notice” (EAN) from Customs. The EAN will typically require the immediate exportation of the cargo at great expensive to the importer, the manufacturer and at a great hassle to all parties involved (broker, shipper, forwarder, manufacturer, vendor, seller, buyer, etc!).

If you have received an Emergency Action Notice, contact experienced trade and WPM attorney David Hsu by phone or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com. Time is of the essence for these WPM cases and call us for immediate options.

 

CBP encounters first-in-US wood-boring wasp species.

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This past Thursday, agriculture specialists at U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Baltimore found a first-in-the-US species of wood-boring wasps – the Urocerus augur Klug (Siricidae).

These wood-boring wasps are known to bore holes in trees and lay their eggs. From your author’s experience on wood-boring wasps, the wasps usually bore holes in dead or dying trees. However, when these wood-boring wasps are in the US, they tend to bore holes in living trees and then laying eggs, which eventually causes the tree to die.

In Baltimore, CBP/agriculture specialists were inspecting a shipment of aluminum coils from Greece and discovered the wasps and boring holes in the wood packaging material (WPM). A sample was sent to USDA entomologists for identification.

In general, WPM with invasive pests are required to be re-exported. If you or someone you know has had an issue with WPM certification or re-exportation of goods due to pests, contact David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com. Before you re-export, contact David Hsu, there may be some alternatives to re-exporting that will save you time and money!