CBP seizes unapproved disinfectant wipes.

Image of seized disinfecting wipes, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers in Alabama seized over $120,000 worth of disinfecting wipes that were mislabeled and unregistered. The 843 boxes contained 20,016 bottles of disinfectant wipes with no approved markings from the FDA or EPA.

Since June of this year, CBP has seized over 120,000 COVID-19 test kits, 10 million counterfeit face masks, 20,000 chloroquine tablets and over 4,000 tablets of antibiotics.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Fake luxury belts seized by Customs.

Seized “Gucci” belts, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Kentucky seized two shipments containing over 648 counterfeit belts. The above photo provided by CBP shows the belts had the Gucci logo – the shipment also included “Salvatore Ferragamo” belt buckles. If real, CBP says the belts have a retail value of $350,496.

Author’s note – CBP media releases usually go into detail about the description of the goods and the packaging or item quality that resulted in Customs questioning the authenticity of the goods. I believe Customs probably scrutinizes any shipment from Hong Kong that contains clothing or accessories.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, give me a call, there might be something we can do to limit your legal liability. Call or text me anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit coolers seized by CBP.

Counterfeit cooler, source: CBP.gov

Earlier this week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) inspected a rail container at the Portal Port of Entry and found coolers in violation of intellectual property rights. The seized coolers, if genuine would total approximately $151,149.

Author note – not sure which brand these coolers appear to be trying to counterfeit – I see RTIC and YETI both have these types of coolers – but could not find one that was similar.

If you have any questions about importing and/or exporting, contact us for a no fee consultation – David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes mislabeled shipment filled with counterfeit goods.

Image of counterfeit sandals, source: CBP.gov

In late June, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers Kentucky detained and seized a shipment containing over 300 counterfeit items shipped from Hong Kong.

While the outside packing list indicated the contents were belts, CBP officers instead found watches from “Rolex”, “Cartier” and “Panerai Luminor”. The shipment also contained sandals from Tory Burch, earrings from Chanel, Gucci sandals bracelets, LV scarves, Gucci scarves, Chanel Scares and many more luxury branded goods. CBP indicated the shipment contained over $371,365 worth of goods – if authentic.

Author’s note: in general, CBP will detain goods suspected of being counterfeit and then send images or samples of the goods to the trademark holder. If the trademark holder tells Customs the goods are not authentic – CBP will seize them and issue the importer of record a seizure notice.

Also – in addition to seizing the goods for being counterfeit, CBP can also seize any goods that are included in the shipment, but not properly declared or mis-declared on the packing list and entry paperwork.

In general – it is easy to run into Customs problems – before you import, or before you export, contact David Hsu by phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com for a free consultation.

Counterfeit professional sports championship rings seized.

Seized counterfeit rings, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in New York’s JFK International Airport seized two shipments containing 144 rings with a combined MSRP of over $216,000 (if authentic). According to the CBP media release, no arrests were made.

Author’s note – sometimes CBP will refer a seizure for criminal prosecution and sometimes they will not. Many seizures will result in a civil penalty issued against the “Importer of Record” (IOR). The IOR may receive a letter from CBP months, or even years after an import has been seized. The civil penalty is something that must be addressed and cannot be ignored.

If you have received a civil penalty in the mail, contact trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit markers seized in Minnesota.

Marking pen sets (002)

Seized fake “Sharpies”, source: CBP.gov

So I blog a lot about seized goods, mostly luxury goods, phones, shoes, medicine, and recently COVID test kits – however this is the first time I’ve seen Customs publish a media release on seizure of school supplies.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Minnesota inspected a rail container and discovered market sets violating intellectual property rights. The seizure contained 5,000 marker sets and if genuine would carry an MRSP of about $115,000. Based off the above picture supplied by Customs, it appears they seized these goods for not using the “Sharpie” brand word mark, but likely for copying the design of the barrel and cap commonly seen on “Sharpie” brand permanent marker.

If your goods have been seized, there may be something you can do – contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP officers seize counterfeit luxury goods.

Shoes

Image of counterfeit shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in North Dakota inspected a rail container and found counterfeit shoes and a dress. CBP officers examined the shoes and seized the shipment for violating intellectual property rights (IPR). From looking at the photo by CBP, it appears the use of the word mark was the basis for the seizure. Most counterfeiters typically copy the pattern, but adding the word mark does violate the IPR.

If authentic, the estimated MSRP of the goods is approximately $28,545.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact David Hsu for a no-cost, no obligation consultation. There are certain things you must know to protect yourself if your goods have been seized. Contact by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.