CBP officers find and destroy gypsy moth eggs on coal ship.

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Image of Asian Gypsy Moth Egg Mass, source: CBP.gov

According to a CBP media release, Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered an egg mass of the highly destructive Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) species on a coal freighter at the Port of Baltimore. The freighter, the M/V Mondial Sun arrived from the United Kingdom to take on coal, and previously called on ports in China and Japan during the summer of 2019. Ports in Asia are high-risk ports for AGM. After leaving Baltimore, the vessel was on the way to Japan.

With this harmful pest situation, CBP agriculture specialists removed the egg mass and treated the affected area with a pest spray.

According to Customs, the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) is one of the most destructive insect pests in the world. AGM are extremely mobile and can lay egg masses yielding hundreds of hungry caterpillars that in turn become other mobile AGM.

In this instance, CBP removed and treated the area where the harmful pests were found. Typically, CBP will discover larvae or the pests themselves inside wood packaging material on cargo ships – if you receive an emergency action notice regarding pests in your shipment – time is of the essence. Contact experienced harmful pest attorney David Hsu immediately by phone/text to 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com

Baltimore CBP stops Asian Gypsy Moths from entering US.

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CBP agriculture specialists removing egg mass, source: cbp.gov

Last week, CBP agriculture specialists at the Port of Baltimore detected over 120 egg masses across 4 different ships.
The Asian Gypsy Moth or AGM for short is a destructive invasive insect pests that is not typically found in the United States. CBP agriculture specialists at Baltimore have intercepted over 120 of the AGM egg masses since July of this year.
The AGM, scientifically known as the Lymantria dispar asiatica/japonica, pose a significant threat to the national forests and urban landscape because they are very mobile and can travel up to 25 miles per day- laying egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars.
If you have had a shipment seized, detained or requiring re-export for fumigation – call experienced pest and invasive species attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com – there may be some other options available besides re-export. Time is of the essence in bug cases so call now!

CBP finds and destroys Asian Gypsy Moth egg masses.

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Images of AGM egg masses seized in Baltimore, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, agriculture specialists in Baltimore discovered egg masses belonging to the Asian Gypsy Moths (AGM). The AGM are an invasive pest that threaten US forests and urban landscapes.

Customs claims the AGM can travel up to 25 miles per hour and lay egg masses that produce hundreds of hungry caterpillars that eat and attack over 500 species of trees and plants.

Vessels from Asia entering the US are typically subject to greater inspection to detect and remove the egg masses and vessels departing ports are inspected and certified to be free of AGM or egg masses.

If you have any import, export, trade or compliance questions, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP reports first encounter with Rosy Gypsy Moth from transport ship in Baltimore.

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Photo by Sascha Hormel on Pexels.com

CBP issued a press release yesterday reporting the first encounter of the Rosy Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) (species: Lymantri mathura). CBP with the U.S. Department of Agriculture discovered the moth aboard a ship in Baltimore and suspect the destructive pest may have been due to a June part call in Japan (a high risk AGM area).

The USDA says the AGM is a threat to forests and urban landscapes as the moth can travel up to 25 miles per day and lay egg masses which yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars. The hungry hungry caterpillars are said to be voracious eaters that attack more than 500 species of trees and plants.

If CBP Agriculture Specialists have detained your vessel at a port and there are issues of whether to turn the ship around or fumigate – call experienced attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.