US Customs seizes family’s life savings.

full frame shot of eye

Photo by Vladislav Reshetnyak on Pexels.com

As has been widely reported in the news, an immigrant family in Ohio had Customs seize $58,100 of their money, an amount described as the family’s life savings.

Rustem Kazazi was headed to Albania when Customs and Border Protection stopped them at the airport and seized their cash. The cash was separated into three stacks ranging from $19,000 to $20,000 per stack.

The family is now suing CBP because they claim CBP used civil forfeiture laws to take the money without an arrest being made or charges against anyone.

Kazazi planned to spend six months in Albania and the funds were earmarked for a vacation home along the Adriatic Cost and to help extended family. The cash was also to pay living expenses while they spent 6 months back in Albania.

Will be following this and the other currency seizure involving the Texas nurse and post updates on the cases as they progress.

I’m surprised the currency was seized in Cleveland as he was supposed to take a flight to Newark, NJ before leaving from there to Albania. The currency reporting requirements are for reporting currency and or monetary instruments over $10,000 upon entering and or leaving the country. It seems in this instant case that Kazazi wasn’t leaving the country when they seized his currency, his next flight was from Ohio to Newark and then to Albania.

If you or someone you know has had a currency seizure and has any questions – contact experienced currency seizure attorney, David Hsu at 832-896-6288 at anytime or email at dhsu@givensjohnston.comm 

ZTE report to the HKEX on the impact of the US denial order: “major operating activities of the Company have ceased”.


According to a May 10, 2018 filing with the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong (HKEX) online here, ZTE announced the April 2018 BIS Denial Order has resulted in “major operating activities of the Company have ceased”.

Earlier in April 2018, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) of the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) issued a Denial Order against ZTE for failing to comply with the terms of a plea deal reached in 2017 after ZTE plead guilty for illegally shipping US equipment to Iran and North Korea. One often cited plea deal was for ZTE to reprimand responsible employees and deny bonuses to those employees. However, BIS determined ZTE did pay full bonuses and kept 35 employees who violated the law.

A “Denial Order” bans American companies from exporting parts to ZTE. In the instant case, ZTE is faced with a 7-year Denial Order and can no longer receive Qualcomm Snapdragon chips (84% of all ZTE phones use Snapdragon chips) and Google Android updates.

The HKEX release further states that, “the Company maintains sufficient cash”, and ends with ZTE indicating they would seek a modification or reversal of the Denial Order and update investors as soon as possible.

It will be interesting to see the second quarter ZTE results if the Denial Order is not reversed – ZTE’s shipped 75% of their smartphone shipments to the US in the first quarter of 2018.