$5.5 million in fake Gucci, Instagram and Facebook clothing seized.

Seized goods, source: CBP.gov

Earlier this past July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at one of our great nation’s biggest seaport of Los Angeles / Long Beach seized a large shipment of women’s sleepwear containing counterfeit brands such as Gucci, Facebook and Instagram.

2020 is a weird year indeed when we consider Facebook and Instagram to be a luxury brand. If authentic the 16,340 items of seized counterfeit pajamas (called “sleeping dresses”) would be worth an approximate retail value of $5.5 million.

CBP reported the counterfeit goods were concealed inside generic non-branded pajamas which CBP believes was intentionally packaged to avoid detection.

Author’s note – yes, in general if you pack counterfeit goods underneath unbranded goods, or try to conceal a counterfeit logo (such as using black tape to cover a logo), CBP will assume you are aware of the nature of the goods and are attempting to smuggle them into the US in violation of 19 USC 1595a (c)(1)(A), in other words merchandise that “is stolen, smuggled, or clandestinely imported or introduced“.

In addition to violating intellectual property rights of the trademark holder, CBP also claims counterfeit goods may not be in compliance with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) requirements for flammability standards of sleepwear.

If you have had your shipment seized for alleged counterfeit violations or seized for alleged violations of CPSC consumer guidelines – contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

What’s the current status of France’s proposed digital tax?

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Photo by TravelingTart on Pexels.com

Last year, France threatened a “digital tax” of 3% on digital revenue of big tech companies such as Facebook and Google. In response, the US threatened tariffs on $2.4 billion of French goods such as wine, cheese, and makeup.

On Monday, January 20th, France said they would delay the the tariffs for the remainder of 2020 in response to US pressure.

And earlier today, at the Davos World Economic Forum, US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reiterated the Trump administration’s claim a digital tax is discriminatory and in response, he threatened tariffs on auto manufacturers if a deal does not work out and the digtal tax is put into effect.

What’s next? Treasury Secretary Mnuchin and his counterpart, France’s foreign minister Bruno Le Maire met earlier today (Wednesday January 22nd), but no news has been released about an agreement between the US and France. Will post more news as it is released.

Facebook no longer allow pre-installation on Huawei smartphones.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

As reported by CNN Hong Kong, Facebook has stopped allowing Huawei to preinstall the Facebook application on Huawei smartphones in response to Huawei’s inclusion on the BIS entity list.

Huawei is the second largest smartphone brand in the world (behind Samsung) and the target of a US export ban. The US is concerned Huawei equipment can be used for Chinese spying, a claim vehemently denied by Huawei. Any US firms that supply to Huawei will need a license in order to export software, goods or service to Huawei.

If you have any questions about how the Huawei export ban may impact your business, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.