CBP seizes mislabeled shipment filled with counterfeit goods.

Image of counterfeit sandals, source: CBP.gov

In late June, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers Kentucky detained and seized a shipment containing over 300 counterfeit items shipped from Hong Kong.

While the outside packing list indicated the contents were belts, CBP officers instead found watches from “Rolex”, “Cartier” and “Panerai Luminor”. The shipment also contained sandals from Tory Burch, earrings from Chanel, Gucci sandals bracelets, LV scarves, Gucci scarves, Chanel Scares and many more luxury branded goods. CBP indicated the shipment contained over $371,365 worth of goods – if authentic.

Author’s note: in general, CBP will detain goods suspected of being counterfeit and then send images or samples of the goods to the trademark holder. If the trademark holder tells Customs the goods are not authentic – CBP will seize them and issue the importer of record a seizure notice.

Also – in addition to seizing the goods for being counterfeit, CBP can also seize any goods that are included in the shipment, but not properly declared or mis-declared on the packing list and entry paperwork.

In general – it is easy to run into Customs problems – before you import, or before you export, contact David Hsu by phone/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com for a free consultation.

$5.5 million in fake Gucci, Instagram and Facebook clothing seized.

Seized goods, source: CBP.gov

Earlier this past July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at one of our great nation’s biggest seaport of Los Angeles / Long Beach seized a large shipment of women’s sleepwear containing counterfeit brands such as Gucci, Facebook and Instagram.

2020 is a weird year indeed when we consider Facebook and Instagram to be a luxury brand. If authentic the 16,340 items of seized counterfeit pajamas (called “sleeping dresses”) would be worth an approximate retail value of $5.5 million.

CBP reported the counterfeit goods were concealed inside generic non-branded pajamas which CBP believes was intentionally packaged to avoid detection.

Author’s note – yes, in general if you pack counterfeit goods underneath unbranded goods, or try to conceal a counterfeit logo (such as using black tape to cover a logo), CBP will assume you are aware of the nature of the goods and are attempting to smuggle them into the US in violation of 19 USC 1595a (c)(1)(A), in other words merchandise that “is stolen, smuggled, or clandestinely imported or introduced“.

In addition to violating intellectual property rights of the trademark holder, CBP also claims counterfeit goods may not be in compliance with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) requirements for flammability standards of sleepwear.

If you have had your shipment seized for alleged counterfeit violations or seized for alleged violations of CPSC consumer guidelines – contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$51k in counterfeit electronics, Apple Air Pods, Jordans and purses seized.

PIT Apple762H 022420

Counterfeit Apple charger.

PIT Gucci889L 040520

Counterfeit “Gucci” purse.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Pittsburgh seized counterfeit consumer goods that included electronics, air pods, sneakers and designer brand purses. If authentic, the value of the seized goods would be more than $51,000. The two above photos are from the CBP media release.

It is obvious the purse is a counterfeit, however, I don’t believe the importers of the AC adapter should have their adapters seized – there is no way an importer or manufacturer would use an image of a red apple and believe someone would think that is a real Apple product.

The counterfeit goods were shipped in 23 separate boxes, of which 19 boxes were from Hong Kong, 2 from China, and 1 each from Singapore and Taiwan. The media release further itemizes the seized goods: 264 flawless shavers (no idea what these are), 235 Apple chargers (which wouldn’t confuse anyone as to their authenticity), 120 “Apple” ear pods, 60 HDMI switches, 21 fully-loaded Nintendo-like gaming systems (probably the emulators running Nestopia?), 20 pairs of Air Jordans and counterfeit purses featuring brand names such as Louis Vuitton, Prada, Fendi and Gucci.

If you have had your good seized and you received a seizure notice from Customs, contact experienced customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.