Huawei’s Google maps alternative.

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As you are aware, Huawei’s inclusion on the US entity list means no access Android and the Google Play Store. As a result Huawei has been looking at alternative companies to replace the Google Maps application – and last week, found their replacement.

According to Reuters, Huawei reached a deal with Dutch mapping company, TomTom which will see TomTom providing Huawei access to their navigation, mapping and traffic information.

With the TomTom information, Huawei will create their own proprietary apps for their own Harmony Operating System.

If you have any questions how Huawei’s inclusion on the BIS entity list will impact your business or if you are in need of export compliance, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei received approximately $75 billion in support from…

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According to a Wall Street Journal article published on Christmas day, Huawei reportedly had “access to as much as $75 billion in state support”. The $75 million figure was a result of the WSJ accounting of public records of Huawei and includes $46 billion in loans and $25 billion in tax cuts.
This recent article from the WSJ may bolster the US government’s case for barring mobile hardware made by Huawei to be used by government agencies. The US government may also cite this argument in it’s appeal to other countries to avoid using Huawei telecommunications equipment when municipalities choose a 5G equipment provider.
Huawei has denied any ties to the Chinese government and Huawei is still subject to a ban on using US origin hardware and software.
If you have any questions on how the Huawei band will impact your business, or if you have concerns about your export compliance with the current ban on Huawei – contact experienced trade and compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Department of Justice charges Indonesian citizen and companies with exporting goods to Iranian airline Mahan Air.

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According to a Department of Justice (DOJ) filing found here, the DOJ charged an individual Indonesian citizen and several Indonesian based companies for violating US export control of goods to Iran. Specifically, the charged individual and companies worked together to export goods originating from the US to Iranian airline Mahan Air. The complaint says the Indonesian national and companies shipped goods owned by Mahan Air through the following Indonesian companies: PT MS Aero Support (“PTMS”), PT Kandiyasa Energi Utama (“PTKEU”) and PT Antasena Kreasi (“PTAK”) .

The charge against the defendants include (i) unlawful and attempted export to an embargoed country, (ii) conspiracy to launder monetary instruments and (iii) false statements.

If you do not want to be the subject of DOJ investigation, call experienced trade controls attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com. Initial consultations are free, contact us to figure out how to protect you and your company from the many hazards of exporting US goods overseas.

Huawei 5G technology coming to the US?

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As Huawei is on the US Commerce Department’s Entity List, Huawei is prevented from doing business with US companies without permission (ie without a license from BIS).
However, media outlets report that Huawei is discussing licensing of their 5G technology to unnamed American companies who have shown interest in long term and one-time transfers. Even a license to an American company may be a violation even if no goods exchange hands.
The Huawei inclusion on the entity list is part of an effort to prevent suspected Chinese government surveillance onto their communications equipment.
If you or your company is interested in doing any business with Huawei – contact experienced BIS/trade compliance attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Newest Huawei P30 smartphone ships with Google Android 10.

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Despite a current ban on US companies from supplying technology to Huawei, the new P30 Pro features a 6.47 inch display, 4 cameras and Google’s  Android 10 (Android 9 “Pie”was the last Android version to be released with a name associated with a confectionary food).
While Google was exempt from export restrictions imposed against Huawei and the supplying of software for new products. Future Huawei smartphones such as the 5G Mate 30 Pro may include the Huawei developed Harmony OS.
If your company does business with Huawei and you want to be sure you are in compliance, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China General Nuclear Power Group added to BIS entity list.

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This past Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Commerce added China General Nuclear Power Group (CGN) to the BIS entity list. As a result, American companies are now prevented from selling any products to China’s largest state-owned nuclear company. If any American company or person does business with CGN (or any other listed entity), they would be violating the law and subject to persecution.

The U.S. Department of Commerce claims CGN its subsidiaries engaged in activity to acquire advanced U.S. nuclear technology and material for use in the Chinese military.

China claims the real goal of placing CGN on the entity list is to limit China’s growth under China’s “Made in China 2025” initiative. Made in China 2025 is an effort by the Chinese government to increase the high tech capability and manufacturing of China. If successful, the “Made in China 2025” efforts will make China the a superpower in high technology in Asia.

If you have any questions about your company’s operations and want to ensure compliance with the new entity list addition, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Intel has begun selling to Huawei as US loosens restrictions.

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Since the US eased restrictions on supplying components to Huawei, the largest US chimpaker, Intel, said they have begun selling products to Huawei “within the rules of the law”. Additionally, Intel says they are also requesting an export license to sell “general purpose computing” chips to Huawei that do not pose a national security risk.

As you are aware, the Trump administration raised concerns regarding the use of Huawei technology may contain backdoors that would allow the Chinese government to spy on users, posing a national security risk. As a result, the US Department of Commerce added Huawei to their entity list this past May. Inclusion on the entity list precluded Huawei from buying parts and components from American companies without US government approval (an export license).

However, after the Trump met with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 summit last month, President Trump said that US firms can resume selling equipment to Huawei.

Additionally, earlier in July, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced an easing of restrictions against the Chinese company in line with Trump’s statements after the G20 summit, stating that the US would issue licenses to US companies looking to sell to Huawei as long as the sales do not pose a threat to national security. An export license would still be required as Huawei has not been removed from the entity list.

If you have any questions whether your company can continue to do business with Huawei, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei’s Android alternative to make first debut … but not on a phone.

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I have previously mentioned Huawei’s Hongmeng OS, their in-house Android alternative that was slated to have an earlier release date after the US placed Huawei on the “entity list”. However, Huawei’s Hongmeng OS’ first device won’t be on a smart phone – but rather on Huawei’s TV with a smart screen. The smart screens on TV’s will be the communication hub for the tv and the living room and is expected to launch next month.

The Hongmeng is also trademarked as “Ark” and has been reported to be in development for a long time. I thought the Hongmeng OS would be shelved for awhile after the reprieve by President Trump, however, it seems Huawei has the new OS ready to go. Will be interested to see how the OS operates and what kind of native application support it will have.

Treasury Secretary Mnuchin urges US suppliers to seek export licenses if they want to resume sales to Huawei.

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As reported by the Wall Street Journal, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin asked U.S. suppliers of Huawei to apply for export licenses in order to resume sales to the Huawei. The export licenses are required as Huawei is listed on the BIS entity list.

At last month’s G20 meeting, Trump announced the ability for US companies to sell to Huawei if there was no threat to “U.S. national security”.

I just checked the BIS website and there are no published guidelines regarding products that would be eligible for a license and what components may be a threat to national security.

While both the US and China agreed to new meetings, there have also been no set dates for new face-to-face meetings.

If you need assistance applying for an export license to sell to Huawei or any other entity on the BIS list, or have questions how the Huawei ban will impact your business, contact experienced export attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

US announces clarification of Huawei ban.

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Wilbur Ross, Official Portrait

At the G-20 summit, President Trump announced that US companies could sell to Huawei. Today, the Trump administration filled in the rest of the details by announcing a relaxation of the restrictions against selling to Huawei – limited the ban only to products that are related to national security.

Yesterday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced that that licenses would be issued to companies to sell their products to Huawei under certain conditions.

On Tuesday Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary, said that Washington would issue licences to companies to sell their products to the Chinese telecoms equipment maker under certain conditions. The main condition being “no threat to US national security”. As Huawei is still on the BIS entity list, companies that sell products not harmful to US national security will still need to apply for a license.

If you have questions about the Huawei ban or would like to apply for an export license, contact export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.