WCO accepts 2022 Edition of the Harmonized System.

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Looking forward to 2022, the World Customs Organization has already accepted the 2022 Edition of the Harmonized System ready to take effect on January 1, 2022.

Known as “HS 2022”, the seventh edition of the Harmonized System (HS) will be the latest revision to the uniform classifying of goods traded internationally around the globe.

As you are aware, the HS number is frequently referred to for Customs tariffs and used to track international trade statistics among the over 200+ economies actively participating in international commerce.

Upcoming changes include:

  1. e-waste product class
  2. new provisions for various novelty tobacco and nicotine products
  3. unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) and drones will have their own specific provision instead of being grouped as “aircraft”
  4. smart phones will also receive their own subheading instead of being listed as “multifunctional devices”
  5. changes to subheadings for glass fibers and articles there of under heading 70.19
  6. changes to subheadings for metal forming machinery under heading 84.62 to reflect changing technologies

and many more changes. The WCO has not indicated all changes but will publish their “Recommendation” soon for a further introduction of upcoming changes.

If you have any questions regarding classification or want to be sure your goods are being entered correctly, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

US Court determines Thanksgiving and Christmas dinnerware is not eligible for duty-free entry into the US.

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In an interesting case, the U.S. Court of Appeals agreed with the Court of International Trade’s argument that dinnerware decorated with “festive motifs” and frequently used during Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner do not qualify for duty-free treatment because the articles are not “for use in specific religious or cultural ritual celebrations”.

The importer’s dinnerware included holiday designs such as Christmas trees, turkeys, wreaths etc. intended for using during a traditional Thanksgiving or Christmas meal. The importer initially claimed the dinnerware was duty-free under HTSUS 9817.95.01 “Certain Festive Articles”. The importer said the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners were specific cultural celebrations and the dinnerware was part of the performance of these celebrations. The CIT claimed, and the US Court of Appeals agreed, that while Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner were cultural celebrations, they however were not specific rituals as required under the HTSUS code.