Deal reached between the US and ZTE.

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Credit: Courtesy of ZTE Corporation

The US will end the ban on ZTE buying American software and hardware.

The terms of the deal require:
1. $1 billion penalty;
2. $400 million in escrow to be forfeited in the event of future export violations during the 10-year probationary period;
3. Compliance team in ZTE that will report to the company’s new chairman;
4. ZTE must change board and management team in 30 days.

Various online articles covering the US/ZTE deal ask what the US gets out of the ZTE deal.

None of the news sources mention that this deal saves ZTE and will lead to business for US suppliers of components and software to ZTE:

-Acacia Communications Inc
-Oclaro,
-Lumentum Holdings,
-FiberHome
-NeoPhotonics Corp
-Inphi Corp
-Finisar Corp
-Analog Devices Inc
-Xilinx Inc
-Qualcomm
-Qorvo Inc.
-Alphabet Inc

If you or anyone you know has questions about the ZTE deal or export compliance questions, feel free to contact experienced trade attorney, David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

It’s official – US issues trade tariffs on steel and aluminum from the EU, Canada and Mexico.

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Photo by Burst on Pexels.com

The Whitehouse issued two presidential proclamations that placed 25% steel and 10% aluminum tariffs on imports from the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

The full proclamations can be found here for steel and here for aluiminum.

If you have any questions on how these new tariffs will impact your business or what options you may have – contact experienced antidumping attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com for a free evaluation.

U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan.

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Image of denier polyester staple fiber courtesy of the Tianjin Glory Tang Technology Co., Ltd.

According to a U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) news release – the Commerce Department announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan.

Commerce determined that exporters from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan sold fine denier polyester staple fiber in the United States at less than fair value. The dumping margins determined by Commerce are as follows:

China – 65.17 – 103.06 percent
India – 21.43 percent
Korea – 0 – 45.23 percent
Taiwan – 0 – 48.86 percent

With today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan based on the final rates, as appropriate.

I find it ironic, one of the petitioners is Nan Ya Plastics Corporation, America – a company that previously imported fine denier polyester staple fiber.

One interested statistic in the Commerce release – the Trump administration has 114 new antidumping and countervailing duty investigations since the beginning of the administration compared to the the 64 initiations in the last 489 days of the previous administration.

If you are an importer of fine denier polyster staple fiber from China, India, Korea or Taiwan and have questions how this decision may impact your business, contact David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

ZTE may need to change management and board in order to access US suppliers.

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Photo by Aaron Kittredge on Pexels.com

According to a May 19th South China Morning Post article – Larry Kudlow, White House economic advisor suggested any change in ZTE’s Denial Order may require a change of management, board and “everything”.

Part of the US decision to re-evaulate the Denial Order against ZTE (effectively cutting ZTE off from their US suppliers) was a result of President Trump asking the Commerce Department to get ZTE back into business.

Senate Finance Leaders Ask Commerce Secretary to Improve Tariff Exclusion Process.

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Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross

According to the Senate Finance Committee website, Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Ranking Member Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) urged the U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to implement improvements to the Commerce Department’s process for excluding products from tariffs on steel and aluminum imports under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.

In short, the letter voices concerns that the process lacks “basic due process and procedural fairness for stakeholders, especially American small businesses” and “appropriate mechanisms to prevent the Section 232 tariffs and product exclusion process from being abused for anticompetitive purposes.”

The Senators write the exclusion request process requires submission of a “substantial amount of information at a minute level of detail” for each imported product and may increase the burden for small businesses. Additionally the Senators state the request and objection forms allow for ambiguity by the Commerce department to approve or deny a product. Lastly, Commerce has not specified how to protect business proprietary information, how to address ex parte communications, how to ensure consistent determination across similar petitioners and objectors.

A full text of the letter can be viewed here (scroll to the bottom, full letter in italics).

If you have any questions about the 232 exclusion process, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832.896.6288 or by email at dhsu@givensjohnston.com.