CBP seizes a combined $92K in unreported currency from 5 different foreign-bound travelers.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized nearly $91,819 from 5 different sets of travelers for violating federal reporting laws of currency in excess of $10,000 or more.

The most recently reported CBP currency seizures included:

  1. $18,171 in U.S. dollars and foreign currency from a family heading to Germany. The family reported $9,500. CBP released 700 Euros ($819 USD conversion) and 3,170 Shekels ($871 USD conversion) to the family for humanitarian purposes.
  2. CBP officers seized $22,449 in U.S. dollars and foreign currency from a man traveling to Austria. The man reported 15,000 Euros but Officers found an additional $4,957 in U.S. dollars on the man’s body and in a carry-on bag.
  3. CBP officers seized $15,650 in U.S. dollars from a woman boarding a flight to Austria Tuesday. The woman reported $9,000. Officers discovered additional currency within a purse and a carry-on bag. Officers released $650 to the woman for humanitarian purposes and released her.
  4. CBP officers seized $13,164 in U.S. dollars from two women boarding a flight to the UAE. The women reported $9,500 but officers discovered additional currency. Officers released $964 to the women for humanitarian purposes and released the women.
  5. CBP officers seized $22,385 in U.S. dollars from a family boarding a flight to Ghana. The family – husband, wife and wife’s sister – reported $5,000 and $7,000. Officers discovered additional currency in envelopes on all three persons that the man claimed to be his. Officers released $385 to the family for humanitarian purposes and released the family.

CBP reports the travelers were either citizens of the U.S., Jordan, Pakistan, or Ghana. None was arrested.

While not mentioned in the CBP release, here’s more information about currency seizures:

  1. You have to report US and foreign currency.
  2. You have to report anything you have while entering or leaving the US.
  3. If you are with your family, they will count the family as 1 person. Each individual family members do not have a $10,000. Like above, I suspect the family going to Ghana in #5 above thought the $10,000 limit was per person.
  4. Humanitarian purposes means CBP will give you some of your money if they believe you will need the money to travel to your ultimate destination.

If you or someone you know has had currency seized, contact experienced currency seizure attorney David Hsu immediately, the time is running on getting your money back. Call 832-896-6288 today or email dhsu@givensjohnston.com.

 

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