Man pleads guilty in multi-million dollar counterfeit cellphone scheme.

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Photo by Tyler Lastovich on Pexels.com

According to CBS 2 news in Boise, Idaho – a man in Boise pleased guilty to trafficking in counterfeit cellphones and accessories. Artur Pupko, age 28, pleaded guilty to selling counterfeit cellphones and cellphone accessories on Amazon and eBay.
According to court documents, Pupko would buy bulk products from China, then repackage the products and claiming them as new and genuine. Pupko may face up to 10 years in prison and a $5 million dollar fine. Sentencing will occur on December 17, 2019.
If you have had your goods seized by Customs and are facing criminal or civil penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by text/call at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Customs seizes more than $400k in fake luxury watches.

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Counterfeit watches, source: CBP.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Philadelphia seized 38 designer brand watches that, if authentic, would have had a manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of $412,750. Instead, they’re headed to destruction.
The shipment from Hong Kong was labeled as containing “Lithium Ion Batteries in CO”, upon further inspection, CBP found counterfeit watches bearing the Rolex, Invicta, Rado and Hublot luxury brand names. CBP also enlisted the efforts of the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandise Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) for verification with the trade mark holders.
If you have had your shipment seized for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced customs seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or dj@gjatradelaw.com.

$2.2 million worth of fake Nike shoes seized by Customs.

Image of seized Nike shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers assigned to the port at LA/Long Beach seized over 14,806 pairs of counterfeit Nike shoes that if genuine, carry an estimated MSRP of $2,247,680.

The seizure was multi-agency and included U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents assigned at the Trade Enforcement Coordination Center (TECC). The shoes were discovered during examination of a shipment from China and were misdeclared as “napkins”.

Apparel, Footwear and Textiles Center of Excellence (AFT Center) import specialists and the trademark owner confirmed the shoes were in violation of Nike’s Air Jordan 1 Off-White, Air Jordan 12, Air Jordan 1 (blue, black, red, white), Air Jordan 11, Air Max ’97 protected designs and trademarks.

If you have had your goods seized by CBP or if they are sending you a civil penalty or you are facing criminal penalties, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

5,200 counterfeit refrigerator water filters seized.

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Image of seized water filters, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at LA/Long Beach port seized 5,202 counterfeit refrigerator water filters that if genuine would have an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $224,202.

The counterfeit filters contained trademarks registered by Brita, GE, Frigidaire, PUR and NSF Certification. As you are aware, trademark owners can register their trademark and CBP will seize infringing use of such trademarks.

The filters were shipped from China and were to be delivered to an address in Washington.

If you or anyone you know has had a shipment seized for suspected infringement of trademarks, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit e-cigarettes seized by CBP.

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According to a US Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers in Phliadelphia seized 300 counterfeit Juul e-cigarette pods. The counterfeit brands were Eonsmoke and VGOD branded cigarette pods of various flavors from Hong Kong. 
After the pods were seized, CBP’s Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers evaluated the goods and verified they were counterfeit. The fake e-cigarettes have a MSRP of $11,500 if authentic. This seizure follows an April seizure of 1,152 counterfeit Juul pods.
As with any media release on counterfeit goods, CBP was quick to point out the dangers of counterfeit goods – especially products such as e-cigarettes which have the potential to damage the health of the users.
If you or someone you know has had a counterfeit seizure, contact experienced customs attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake NBA championship rings worth $560,000 seized by Customs.

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Image of counterfeit NBA rings, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release – officers assigned at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) seized 28 counterfeit NBA rings with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $560,000.

According to the media release, the rings were shipped from China and packaged in a wooden box to be sold as a collection of championship rings from multiple teams – including the Cavaliers, Lakers, Bulls, etc.

When CBP suspects items are counterfeit, they will take photos or send samples to the  Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Center of Excellence (CPMM Center) for a final determination regarding the authenticity of the items. If they are determined to be counterfeit, CBP will seize the goods and issue a seizure notice to the importer of record (in this instance, it is a not a formal entry – so the notice would be shipped to the person receiving the goods).

If you have had your goods seized by CBP, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit goods seized at Kentucky World Fest.

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Counterfeit goods seized at 2019 WorldFest. (Source: Louisville Metro Alcoholic Beverages Licences)

According to WDRB, a local station in Louisville, Kentucky – an investigation funded by a 2-year, $25,000 federal grant from the US Department of Justice resulted in the seizure of more than $1 million worth of counterfeit goods from this past weekend’s WorldFest.

The article did not specify the brands that were seized, but did mention the counterfeit items included purses and sunglasses. Two men, 59-year-old Kassoum Thiam and 52-year-old Saidou Djau were cited for selling counterfeit merchandise at five separate booths.

While this was not a customs seizure, I’m pretty sure the next step for investigators is coordinate with CBP to determine how or where the two men received the merchandise.

If you or anyone you know is facing accusations of importing counterfeit merchandise or have had items seized by Customs for suspicion of being counterfeit – contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit electronic door locks.

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Image of seized counterfeit locks, source: cbp.gov

According to a US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers inspected a rail container and discovered electronic locks in violation of intellectual property rights (IPR) regulations. The seizure consister of 3,856 counterfeit locks with an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $760,841 if the goods had been genuine.

The counterfeit locks are the Lockly brand and typically retail for about $279.99 each.

The remainder of the press releases explained that illicit goods damage the US economy and threaten the health and safety of Americans.

If you have had your imports seized by Customs, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu – we can help fight to get your imports back – call 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

CBP seizes $1 million dollars worth of counterfeit phones.

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Image of the seized phones, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Philadelphia seized a a combined 4,449 counterfeit LG and ASUS smartphones in July. If the phones were authentic, they would have a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $941,450.

The counterfeit phones were shipped from China and included 2,043 counterfeit LG phones in the first shipment and 1,926 LG and 480 ASUS counterfeit smartphones in the second shipment.

According to Customs, the phones were shipped from China to the Dominican Republic and then to Philadelphia. The phones were described in the paperwork as “cell phones used”. CBP says the phones will be destroyed.

If you have had your cell phones seized, contact experienced cellphone seizure attorney David Hsu immediately at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP says the phones will be “destroyed”, however, there hasn’t been enough time from the date of the seizure to the date of the media release – there is still time to do something to get the phones released.

There are ways to get the phones released, contact David Hsu immediately – time is of the essence!

CBP seizes $3.4 million worth of counterfeit luxury goods.

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According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers in Los Angeles seized handbags, belts, shoes, watches, electronics and other counterfeit items from brands such as Hermes, Fendi, Gucci, Versace, Casio and Samsung from a shipment originating from Hong Kong.

Import specialists stopped the shipment and seized over 5,300 counterfeit products that have an estimated MSRP of $3,475,000. The seizures included 1,242 counterfeit Gucci belts, 678 counterfeit Nike shoes, 531 counterfeit Louis Vuitton, 500 counterfeit Samsung adaptors and 502 counterfeit Gucci fanny packs among other items.

If you have had items seized by Customs due to suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.