CBP seizes $1 million dollars worth of counterfeit phones.

PHL Phones1H 072619.jpg

Image of the seized phones, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Philadelphia seized a a combined 4,449 counterfeit LG and ASUS smartphones in July. If the phones were authentic, they would have a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $941,450.

The counterfeit phones were shipped from China and included 2,043 counterfeit LG phones in the first shipment and 1,926 LG and 480 ASUS counterfeit smartphones in the second shipment.

According to Customs, the phones were shipped from China to the Dominican Republic and then to Philadelphia. The phones were described in the paperwork as “cell phones used”. CBP says the phones will be destroyed.

If you have had your cell phones seized, contact experienced cellphone seizure attorney David Hsu immediately at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP says the phones will be “destroyed”, however, there hasn’t been enough time from the date of the seizure to the date of the media release – there is still time to do something to get the phones released.

There are ways to get the phones released, contact David Hsu immediately – time is of the essence!

CBP seizes $3.4 million worth of counterfeit luxury goods.

close up photography of red and black nike running shoe

Photo by Shane Aldendorff on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers in Los Angeles seized handbags, belts, shoes, watches, electronics and other counterfeit items from brands such as Hermes, Fendi, Gucci, Versace, Casio and Samsung from a shipment originating from Hong Kong.

Import specialists stopped the shipment and seized over 5,300 counterfeit products that have an estimated MSRP of $3,475,000. The seizures included 1,242 counterfeit Gucci belts, 678 counterfeit Nike shoes, 531 counterfeit Louis Vuitton, 500 counterfeit Samsung adaptors and 502 counterfeit Gucci fanny packs among other items.

If you have had items seized by Customs due to suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Officers seize counterfeit items.

Entire IPR Nike & Exclipse

Images of the seized Nike earbuds and watches, source CBP.gov

According to a US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers at the Champlain Port of Entry seized a shipment of more than 500 counterfeit Nike ear buds and over 200 counterfeit Eclipse watches. The shipment had a Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) value of $22,599.

The ear buds were suspected to be counterfeit due to the poor quality. Further examination confirmed the goods were counterfeit.

While not mentioned in the media release, CBP will send photos or samples to the holder of the intellectual property for verification. Most likely a photo was taken and submitted to Nike along with the details of the shipment. Nike would then confirm the shipment to be counterfeit.

The goods from Canada were seized. Also not mentioned in the media release, CBP will send a seizure notice to the importer of record. If the importer of record does not take any action, the goods will be forfeited and destroyed by Customs at a later date.

If you have had a seizure for intellectual property violations and want to discuss your options, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit Cartier products valued over $2.6 million.

IMG_2962

Counterfeit Cartier bracelets, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Louisiana intercepted 180 pieces of counterfeit Cartier jewelry from a shipment from Hong Kong. If authentic Cartier, the bracelets would hold a MSRP of more than $2.6 million.

CBP officers inspected the parcel with a packing list specifying “jewelry accessory”. Upon inspection, they found bracelets packaged in Cartier boxes and determined the poor quality bracelets were counterfeit.

As have been previously posted on this blog, Hong Kong is commonly known by CBP to frequently ship counterfeit jewelry such as watches and accessories such as hats. This seizure is the largest (in terms of dollar value) for the entire year.

 

CBP Seizes $253k in Counterfeit Edison speakers from China.

PHL Speakers30M 061319

Image of seized speakers, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers seized 1,626 counterfeit Edison Professional speakers in Philadelphia earlier this week. If the Edison speakers were authentic, the manufacturer’s suggested retail price would have been approximately $253,572.

The speakers arrived in two shipments from China destined for an address in Los Angeles. CBP suspected the speakers were counterfeit because of poor packaging and markings. CBP’s Electronics Centers for Excellence and Expertise, confirmed the Bluetooth markings on the speakers were counterfeit.

My guess is these speakers were to be sold through the “white van” scams where people sell supposedly high end speakers or counterfeit speakers from a van. The pitch is that the speakers are “leftovers” from an installation and the installers were told to get rid of them.

CBP claims counterfeit goods cause revenue loss, damage the US economy and threaten the health and safety of Americans. CBP claims in 2018 over $3.7 million worth of good were seized daily for intellectual property rights (IPR) violations.

In our practice, most of the IPR are for fake markings such as the “UL” or “Bluetooth” or “USB” logos in addition to our frequent seizures of Apple and Samsung phones. Protip – if you import legos, that’s fine, but do not include the minifigure head – it will be seized.

If you have had a Customs seizure for IPR violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Hong Kong Customs seizes fake Apple and Samsung parts at a repair facility.

boat on body of water

Photo by Nextvoyage on Pexels.com

According to a South China Morning Post article, Hong Kong Customs officials investigated and ultimately raided a cell phone repair shop after receiving complaints from a trademark holder (not specified whether Apple or Samsung complained).

The article claimed the repair shop refurbished devices for clients in the US, UK and Australia that sent second-hand phones for repair at 1/3 the typical rate of an authorized repair facility. The repairs typically included replacing the screen or housing.

HK Customs officials claimed the repair shop used counterfeit parts to repair damaged iPhones, and seized over $120,000 worth of fake goods.

Based on the article, I’m pretty sure Apple complained about the IP violations since most Samsung phones do not have the housing replaced when being refurbished. While not listed in the article, the IP violations probably were for the wordmark “iPhone” or the trademark Apple logo found on the back housing. The iPhone replacement glass do not have any IP marks, so the seized goods were most likely the housings.

If you have any cell phone seizures, contact experienced cell phone seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seize counterfeit Point of Sale machines.

point-of-sale-machine

Image of counterfeit POS machines, source: CBP

According to a CBP media release, agents at the International Falls Port of Entry seized more than 1,315 counterfeit Point of Sale machines bearing counterfeit “micros ORACLE” marks.

If authentic, the MSRP of the merchandise would be approximately $2.4 million. If you have had a counterfeit seizure, contact experienced Customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP officers seize counterfeit “Memphis” sound bars.

memphis soundbar

Photo of counterfeit sound bars, source: CBP Media Release website.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seize sound bars on a rail container at the International Falls Port of Entry. Upon inspection of the rail container, CBP officers found the sound bars and seized approximately 600 of them due to violation of intellectual property rights. The total MSRP is $530,970 if the sound bars were genuine.

If you or someone you know has a had a seizure by Customs for suspected counterfeit merchandise, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com

Customs seizes over $100k+ in counterfeit phone cases.

IAD IPR Cases4 043019

Photo of the seized counterfeit cases. Source: CBP Media Release website.

CBP officers in air cargo at Washington Dulles international airport seized over $100,000+ in counterfeit designer phone brand cases if authentic.

As seen in the photo above from the Customs media release website, the phone cases included counterfeit marks from LV, Gucci, Nike, Supreme, and other luxury brands.

The media release indicated the Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise, confirmed with trademark holders that the merchandise was counterfeit.

The CBP media release also says counterfeit goods threaten the US economy, health and safety of US citizens and proceeds from sales of counterfeit goods funds criminal activity.

If you or someone you know has had goods seized on suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

 

 

Louisville CBP Seizes Nearly $2.6 Million in Counterfeit Merchandise.

analogue chrome dial focus

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release on May 14th, officers seized a large shipment of counterfeit luxury watches, handbags, and sunglasses in Louisville. CBP estimates the manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) for the fake goods are worth an estimated $2.5 million if the goods were genuine.

The shipment contained counterfeit Rolex and Hublot watches, counterfeit Oakley sunglasses and Michael Kors handbags. Samples of the shipment were sent to CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise (CEE) where they were determined to be counterfeit.

The shipment contained 57 Rolex watches, 19 Oakley sunglasses, four Michael Kors handbags, and five Hublot watches, all determined to be counterfeit by CBP’s trade experts at the Centers of Excellence and Expertise. Last year, CBP estimates they seized $3.7 million worth of counterfeit products on a typical day.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs for suspected counterfeit or other intellectual property rights violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.