Hong Kong Customs seizes fake Apple and Samsung parts at a repair facility.

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According to a South China Morning Post article, Hong Kong Customs officials investigated and ultimately raided a cell phone repair shop after receiving complaints from a trademark holder (not specified whether Apple or Samsung complained).

The article claimed the repair shop refurbished devices for clients in the US, UK and Australia that sent second-hand phones for repair at 1/3 the typical rate of an authorized repair facility. The repairs typically included replacing the screen or housing.

HK Customs officials claimed the repair shop used counterfeit parts to repair damaged iPhones, and seized over $120,000 worth of fake goods.

Based on the article, I’m pretty sure Apple complained about the IP violations since most Samsung phones do not have the housing replaced when being refurbished. While not listed in the article, the IP violations probably were for the wordmark “iPhone” or the trademark Apple logo found on the back housing. The iPhone replacement glass do not have any IP marks, so the seized goods were most likely the housings.

If you have any cell phone seizures, contact experienced cell phone seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seize counterfeit Point of Sale machines.

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Image of counterfeit POS machines, source: CBP

According to a CBP media release, agents at the International Falls Port of Entry seized more than 1,315 counterfeit Point of Sale machines bearing counterfeit “micros ORACLE” marks.

If authentic, the MSRP of the merchandise would be approximately $2.4 million. If you have had a counterfeit seizure, contact experienced Customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP officers seize counterfeit “Memphis” sound bars.

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Photo of counterfeit sound bars, source: CBP Media Release website.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seize sound bars on a rail container at the International Falls Port of Entry. Upon inspection of the rail container, CBP officers found the sound bars and seized approximately 600 of them due to violation of intellectual property rights. The total MSRP is $530,970 if the sound bars were genuine.

If you or someone you know has a had a seizure by Customs for suspected counterfeit merchandise, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by text/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com

Customs seizes over $100k+ in counterfeit phone cases.

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Photo of the seized counterfeit cases. Source: CBP Media Release website.

CBP officers in air cargo at Washington Dulles international airport seized over $100,000+ in counterfeit designer phone brand cases if authentic.

As seen in the photo above from the Customs media release website, the phone cases included counterfeit marks from LV, Gucci, Nike, Supreme, and other luxury brands.

The media release indicated the Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise, confirmed with trademark holders that the merchandise was counterfeit.

The CBP media release also says counterfeit goods threaten the US economy, health and safety of US citizens and proceeds from sales of counterfeit goods funds criminal activity.

If you or someone you know has had goods seized on suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

 

 

Louisville CBP Seizes Nearly $2.6 Million in Counterfeit Merchandise.

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According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release on May 14th, officers seized a large shipment of counterfeit luxury watches, handbags, and sunglasses in Louisville. CBP estimates the manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) for the fake goods are worth an estimated $2.5 million if the goods were genuine.

The shipment contained counterfeit Rolex and Hublot watches, counterfeit Oakley sunglasses and Michael Kors handbags. Samples of the shipment were sent to CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise (CEE) where they were determined to be counterfeit.

The shipment contained 57 Rolex watches, 19 Oakley sunglasses, four Michael Kors handbags, and five Hublot watches, all determined to be counterfeit by CBP’s trade experts at the Centers of Excellence and Expertise. Last year, CBP estimates they seized $3.7 million worth of counterfeit products on a typical day.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs for suspected counterfeit or other intellectual property rights violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes $7.8 million in fake luxury goods.

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Image of seized counterfeit Breitling watch. Source: CBP website.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP agents in Cincinnati seized approximately $7.8 million in counterfeit goods over a three day period in April. The counterfeit items included watches, apparel and other high end merchandise.

While the CBP media release did not specify the items, they did include the above photo of a counterfeit Bretiling watch. If you or someone you know has received a seizure notice by CBP for importation of counterfeit goods that violate intellectual property rights (IPR), contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for immeidate assistance and to discuss your options: by cell/text: 832.896.6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Custom seizes counterfeit baseball jerseys.

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According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), officers seized 314 counterfeit jerseys for Phliadelphia Phillies player, Bryce Harper. If authentic, the estimated value of the counterfeit totals over $44,040.

CBP’s media release further states the harm to the wearer (potential use of flammable textiles) and the economic harm to the US (trademark holders lose revenue, loss of revenue for American workers) and the funding of black market activities such as human trafficking.

If you have had a CBP seizure for the suspicion of counterfeit items, contact experienced customs seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit Juul pods seized by CBP.

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Seized Juul pods. Source: US CBP

Earlier this week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Philadelphia reported a seizure of more than 1,152 counterfeit Juul pods, three chargers and a Juul device from overseas.

According to the CBP, the description of the item was “plastic pipe sample” from China. Upon inspection, CBP found 36 cartons of Juul pods suspected to be counterfeit.

Working with CBP’s Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise, officers verified the merchandise were counterfeits through the trademark holders.

CBP claims the merchandise has a MSRP of $4,700 if authentic. The rest of the media release reminds the public of the danger posed by unregulated manufacturing facilities that may result in products that are hazardous to the public.

If you or someone you know has had a customs seizure, contact experienced customs attorney David Hsu for information on how we may be able to get your goods released. Call or text 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$270,000 worth of counterfeit luxury hats seized by Customs.

Images of the seized hats. Source: CBP media release website.

According to a Customs media release, Dulles Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized 450 counterfeit hats worth about $207,000 if they were the genuine articles. The hats were seized as they arrived from Washington Dulles International airport destined for US addresses.

The shipment of hats contained brands such as Gucci, Chanel, LV, Supreme, Adidas and Louis Vuitton.

If you have had a seizure of goods suspected of being counterfeit, contact experienced customs seizure attorney David Hsu at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, or text/call 832.896.6288.

Can you import refurbished cell phones?

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I get asked this question a lot – and the answer is yes you can. However, cell phones are frequently detained and seized by Customs.

Why are imported refurbished phones detained or seized?
Customs enforces the intellectual property and trademarks of any manufacturer or holder of intellectual property. Apple and Samsung have filed their trademarks and word marks with Customs and CBP may seize your phones (and batteries if they are branded Samsung).

I thought there was an exception for counterfeit goods?
I previously posted on my blog about the counterfeit exception for 1 item. However, that exception only applies if it is carried on you, it will not apply if the counterfeit item is sent by mail.

But my goods are genuine iPhones, why are they still seized?
When suspected counterfeit goods are seized – CBP will take a photo and send to Apple, Samsung (or other property rights holder). The trademark holder will more likely than not tell CBP the phone is counterfeit. From my experience, I have never had any trademark holder agree that the phone is authentic.

How do I know if my cell phone shipment is seized?
Customs will send you a Notice of Seizure signed by the Fines, Penalties and Forfeiture officer of the port where your phones were seized. You have 30 days from the day of the letter to respond. Please note the 30 days is not from the day you receive the notice.

What if I don’t respond to the seizure notice?
If you do nothing, then the goods will be forfeited after the response date. Forfeited means destroyed. Customs may then issue you a civil penalty based on the value of the phones. The value will be retail and not reflect what you paid wholesale or your actual cost. The valuation of the shipment is important because that value is used to determine civil penalties.

I have more questions!
Call David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com. There are some things we can do and time is of the essence – call now, no cost or obligation.