Customs agents in Puerto Rico seize counterfeit goods valued over $5.3 million.

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Images of seized goods in Puerto Rico, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, agents in Puerto Rico seized over 289 shipments of counterfeit goods destined for addresses in Puerto Rico.

A composite photo of a sampling of seized goods include counterfeit LV, Gucci, Apple and Supreme. If authentic, Customs valued the shipments of seized goods totaling over $5.3 million. Other seized goods include watches, jewelry, bags, clothing and sunglasses featuring brands such as Hublot, Pandora, Nike, and Rolex.

If you or someone you know has received a notice of seizure for counterfeit goods, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes counterfeit Louis Vuitton handbags.

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Image of seized handbags, source: CBP.gov

As reported by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), officers in Philadelphia seized 37 counterfeit LV handbags from Hong Kong with a suggested retail proce of $130,610 if authentic. 

According to the media release, the box contents were described as “Lady Bag Sample.” Upon inspection by CBP and with the CEE for Consumer Products and Mass Merchandise Center and the trademark holder – determined the bags were counterfeit.

If you receive a seizure notice for violation of trademarks or other intellectual property, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com – there are somethings you can do to protect yourself from potential civil and criminal penalties – but you need to take action within a certain time limit. For immediate assistance, call/text 832-896-6288.

Trump Administration may place overseas Amazon.com websites on the counterfeit goods list.

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Photo by Fabian Hurnaus on Pexels.com

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Trump Administration may place several of Amazon.com’s international websites on the “Notorious Markets” list.

The “Notorious Markets” list is an annual publication by the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) Office of global marketplaces known to sell counterfeit goods.

In response, Amazon claims they “strictly prohibit” counterfeit products on their online platforms and take many efforts to prevent customers from buying counterfeit goods.

In the past, the Notorious Markets list has included Taobao (China’s largest e-commerce platform owned by the Alibaba Group).

Currently, the USTR has been asked by the American Apparel and Footwear Association (AAFA) to include domains owned and operated by Amazon on the list.

If you have any questions about the Notorious Markets List, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit Juul pods seized by CBP.

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– Image of counterfeit Juul pods, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers at the port of St. Louis seized 2,379 counterfeit Juul pods. The counterfeit Juul pods were shipped from Hong Kong to an address in Missouri. If authentic, the approximate value of the seized pods were approximately $38,040.

Due to the recent media attention of vaping deaths, the United States Food and Drug Administration (and through CBP) is very concerned about harmful products that may cause illnesses and death to people who vape.

One other giveaway is the importation of Juul pods, as Juul pods are produced in the US according to US government standards.

If you have had your goods seized, and want to discuss your options. Contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by cell/phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes 20,000 counterfeit Oral-B brush heads from China.

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Image of seized counterfeit brush heads, source: CBP.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers seized 20,400 counterfeit Oral-B toothbrush. CBP officers noticed the poor packaging and lack of quality control while branded with the Oral-B brand name.

As is the case with all suspected counterfeit goods, the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise verified with Oral-B the goods were not authentic. Customs estimated if authentic, the seized goods have an MSRP of $95,600.

CBP claims the counterfeit goods “pose a serious health threat to consumers, as do all counterfeit healthcare products. Counterfeit brush heads are manufactured in unsanitary facilities with substandard materials that may sicken users or cause bleeding to a user’s gums or mouth, and structural defects may cause the brush head to detach and potentially choke users.”

This is one of the few instances where I believe the counterfeit goods should be avoided – definitely not worth buying the counterfeit goods as they risk harm to your dental health.

If you are caught importing counterfeit goods, you may be hit with a civil penalty at a later date – contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu immediately for help – 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Louisville CBP seizes over $95 million in counterfeit goods over 3 month period.

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Image of seized counterfeit watches, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release,  CBP officers in Louisville, Kentucky seized 164 shipments containing counterfeit goods with an estimated MSRP of $95 million. This figure represents an increase of 75% over the same period last year.

The seized items include counterfeit designer bags, jewelry, shoes, sunglasses and more. While CBP handles the seizures, CBP officers work along with the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centeres for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) to verify authenticity of trademarks. As a side note, I have never had a trademark holder agree that the goods were not counterfeit – I don’t believe any trademark holder will agree their goods are authentic.

The rest of the media release talks about why buying counterfeit goods are bad (poor quality control, maybe contains hazardous materials, funds criminal activity, etc.).

If you have had your good seized, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com. There may be something we can do to get your seized goods back.

Counterfeit Botox shipments seized.

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Seized counterfeit Botox, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Cincinnati’s express consignment facility recently seized multiple shipments of counterfeit Botox injections. The shipments were sent from Shenzhen and labeled as “leggings” and “facial gift”. The shipments were to be sent to individuals in Alabama, Texas and Utah.

Botox (botulinum toxin) is restricted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and cannot be imported into the U.S. without proper documentation. Pharmaceutical companies that produce legitimate botulinum toxin products can import them into the US and CBP has issued an informed compliance publication detailing how these products can legally be imported into the U.S.

While the Customs media release designates these Botox as counterfeit, I believe these Botox injections are an example of what is known as “parallel importation”. In parallel importation, individuals import drugs from countries where the government regulates the cost of pharmaceuticals. These countries that regulate the cost of pharmaceuticals include the UK, Germany, France, Sweden and Canada. In the CBP media release, the seized Botox appears to be labeled in German. Most likely the shipper in Shenzhen buys the Botox from the UK, Germany, France, Sweden and exports to the US at a lower cost than Botox in the US.

If you or someone you know has had their shipment over pharmaceutical drugs shipped from overseas seized in the US, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

 

CBP seize counterfeit Patriots, Astros and Yankees rings.

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Counterfeit Patriots Super Bowl Ring – source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers seized nine counterfeit Patriots Super Bowl rings and two other counterfeit championship rings for the Houston Astros and New York Yankees.

If authentic, the rings would carry a manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of $526,000. The shipment from China was described as a “box” with a value of $14.00.

After the shipment was detained, CBP and the Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise verified the rings were counterfeit.

If you have had a shipment detained for counterfeit goods, you need to give us a call. Customs has and will send penalty notices and there may be some other options. Contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake airbags from China seized in Ontario, California.

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Image of seized airbag, source: cbp.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) press release, officers at Ontario International Airport (ONT) express air cargo operations in Ontario, California along with the import specialists (IS) assigned to the Automotive & Aerospace Center of Excellence (AA Center) seized counterfeit Honda airbags arriving in packages from China.

Eight Honda airbags were arriving from China when CBP officers discovered the airbags during an examination of the express packages. The airbags were sent to import specialists who focused on automobile parts and confirmed the airbags were in violation of Honda’s  protected mark. If the airbags were genuine, they carried an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $4,856.

The remainder of the CBP article highlights the dangers of purchasing fake parts that may not function as well as OEM parts.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs for suspicion of counterfeit goods, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes +$2 million in counterfeit goods from China.

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Counterfeit goods seized by CBP, source: cbp.gov

According to a  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers in Washington Dulles airport seized fake goods from China with a MSRP of $2 million destined to Flushing, New York.

The air cargo shipment contained 2,601 coin purses, 459 purses, and backpacks with counterfeit logos of luxury brand names such as Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Chanel.

When CBP seizes suspected counterfeit goods, they send samples and photos to the CBP Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise (CEE) for verification with the trademark holders.

The goods were determined to be counterfeit (no trademark holder has ever agreed that a product was not counterfeit), and if authentic, would have an MSRP of $2,244,370.

If you have had your shipment seized by CBP on suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for assistance, we can explore your options. If you have received a penalty notice for violation of intellectual property rights, give us a call or text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.