CBP in Puerto Rico seize counterfeit alloy wheels.

Photo by Reynaldo #brigworkz Brigantty on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, San Juan Field Operations seized a shipment of 844 counterfeit alloy car wheels with an estimated manufacturer suggested retail price of approximately $238,000, if genuine.

The media release quotes CBP officials who claim counterfeit auto parts are safety risks for drivers as the fake rims do not meet industry wide safety standards. The seizure of counterfeit alloy wheels is just one of multiple seizures of car related parts – from fake air bags, fog lights and tires.

If CBP has seized your goods for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

$400,000 in counterfeit merchandise seized by CBP.

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Image of seized goods containing unregistered Bluetooth marks, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Detroit seized electronic goods and licensed merchandise imported from China. The seized goods contained bluetooth marks (unregistered with Bluetooth) on the headphones, smart bands, and various speakers. In addition to the electronic devices, included counterfeit hats bearing copyrighted Star Wars images. If authentic, the value of all goods would retail for about $325,000.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact David Hsu for a no cost consultation on what you need to do to protect yourself – call anytime by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Game over – CBP seizes counterfeit PS4 controllers.

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Image of fake controllers, source: CBP.gov

This week, CBP seized a shipment of fake PS4 wireless controllers that arrived from Hong Kong. The shipment contained 55 of the dual shock 4 wireless controllers and suspected the controllers were counterfeit since they all had the same serial number.

As is the usual case with seizures based off intellectual property rights violations, an image of the seized controllers was sent to Sony for verification. I’ve never had a trademark holder agree with a client the goods were not authentic.

If authentic the seized controllers would retail for $3,300. If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

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Alternate image of fake controllers, source: CBP.gov

Counterfeit Pokemon, gotta catch ’em all!

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Seized Pokemon, source: CBP.gov

Pennsylvania U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers didn’t catch them all, but they did catch 86,000 of them. The seized shipment from Hong Kong was described as “plastic furnishing articles” but instead contained counterfeit Pokemon figurines in 15 boxes.

The figurines were seized for violations of violating U.S. intellectual property rights along with being a potential choking hazard. The estimated value of the shipment, if authentic is approximately $603,936. CBP usually tests counterfeit toys for lead levels, but did not do so in this instance.

If your goods have been seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text for a no cost or obligation consultation at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Seizes Fake Cat and Dog Flea Collars.

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Counterfeit “seresto” brand food, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Pittsburgh seized 58 fake “Seresto” brand dog and cat flea collars so far this month. CBP officers seized the 13 parcels and submitted samples the the trademark holder, Bayer. The shipments were from China and Hong Kong and if genuine have an approximate retail value of $3,500.

CBP has warned pet owners to not purchsae counterfeit collars as they may contain harmful ingredients that could cause chemical burns or fur loss.

If your goods have been seized by Customs, contact David Hsu by phone/text for a no cost or obligation consultation at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Counterfeit Super Bowl rings seized.

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Image of seized rings, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers at O’Hare’s International Mail Facility seized a package of 35 counterfeit NFL Championship rings from China. The April shipment was held for further inspection due to x-ray images showing inconsistencies. The shipment was declared as ring and valued at $10 each. However, upon opening the packages, CBP officers found 35 counterfeit NFL Championship rings. CBP determined the rings to be counterfeit due to poor quality, poor packaging and low value. The approximate MSRP of the rings, if real, would have been $350,000.

According to the Customs media release:

The parcel contained fake Superbowl rings for the NY Jets (1) and Giants (4), Pittsburgh Steelers (6), San Francisco 49ers (5), Dallas Cowboys (5), Washington Redskins (5), Green Bay Packers (6) and Denver Broncos (3).

If you have had your shipment seized for IPR violations, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP officers seize counterfeit luxury goods.

Shoes

Image of counterfeit shoes, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in North Dakota inspected a rail container and found counterfeit shoes and a dress. CBP officers examined the shoes and seized the shipment for violating intellectual property rights (IPR). From looking at the photo by CBP, it appears the use of the word mark was the basis for the seizure. Most counterfeiters typically copy the pattern, but adding the word mark does violate the IPR.

If authentic, the estimated MSRP of the goods is approximately $28,545.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact David Hsu for a no-cost, no obligation consultation. There are certain things you must know to protect yourself if your goods have been seized. Contact by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Fake Cialis and Viagra Pills Seized by CBP.

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Counterfeit medication from Turkey; source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Kentucky seized counterfeit Cialis and Viagra pills in Kentucky. The shipment from Turkey was destined to a city in California and labeled as “throat lozenges and candies”. However, CBP’s experienced officers looked at the totality of the circumstances and determined the route of the shipment and the packaging of the pills were indicative of being counterfeit pills.

Customs warns consumers of the dangers of buying counter medicines – which may have the incorrect or harmful ingredients.

If you have had your shipment seized by Customs, contact customs seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Customs seizes over 1.5 million dollars in fake perfume.

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Image of the seized perfume in Miami, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers and import specialists in Miami seized over 1,440 cartons, holding about 60,000 bottles of perfume in bottles with counterfeit trademarks. If authentic the MSRP of the perfume is more than 1.7 million.

The April 9th seizure was probably in advance of Mother’s Day next week and contained counterfeit trademarks belonging to Christian Dior, Chanel and more.

Besides the economic cost to legitimate products, CBP highlighted the risk of using counterfeit perfumes – as the use of counterfeit perfumes may expose the consumer to hazardous chemicals.

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If you have had your good seized by Customs, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for a free no cost consultation by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP Half-Million Dollars in Counterfeit Electronics and Dental Gels

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, CBP officers in Philadelphia seized a half-million dollars’ worth of counterfeit electronics in Philadelphia in mid-April. The two shipments from China contained more than 20,000 pieces of 35 different counterfeit consumer electronics, such as video gaming systems, speakers, watches, cameras, scanners, DVD players, headphones, chargers and other electronics. Besides the consumer electronics, they also seized counterfeit injectable dental gels.

The MSRP of the seized goods, if authentic are estimated to be approximately $519,510.

If you have had your good seized by Customs for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text 24/7 at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.