CBP stops invasive Scarab beetle pests from entering the US.

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Scarab beetle, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists in Florida stopped several invasive pests from entering the US – specifically the scarab beetle and heteroptera. The scarab beetle can infest and destroy crops while the heteroptera is known to damage plant roots.

According to the CBP media release, agriculture specialists in 2018 seized on average 319 pests at U.S. ports of entry and 4,552 materials for quarantine: plant, meat, animal byproduct and soil each day!

If you have had a Customs seizure due to an infestation of pests or wood-boring insects in wooden packaging materials – contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP Seizes $253k in Counterfeit Edison speakers from China.

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Image of seized speakers, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release, officers seized 1,626 counterfeit Edison Professional speakers in Philadelphia earlier this week. If the Edison speakers were authentic, the manufacturer’s suggested retail price would have been approximately $253,572.

The speakers arrived in two shipments from China destined for an address in Los Angeles. CBP suspected the speakers were counterfeit because of poor packaging and markings. CBP’s Electronics Centers for Excellence and Expertise, confirmed the Bluetooth markings on the speakers were counterfeit.

My guess is these speakers were to be sold through the “white van” scams where people sell supposedly high end speakers or counterfeit speakers from a van. The pitch is that the speakers are “leftovers” from an installation and the installers were told to get rid of them.

CBP claims counterfeit goods cause revenue loss, damage the US economy and threaten the health and safety of Americans. CBP claims in 2018 over $3.7 million worth of good were seized daily for intellectual property rights (IPR) violations.

In our practice, most of the IPR are for fake markings such as the “UL” or “Bluetooth” or “USB” logos in addition to our frequent seizures of Apple and Samsung phones. Protip – if you import legos, that’s fine, but do not include the minifigure head – it will be seized.

If you have had a Customs seizure for IPR violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes hatching eggs shipped from the Netherlands.

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Image of hatching eggs, source: cbp media release.

Earlier this month U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the international mail facility in Miami seized 30 suspected hatching eggs. The shipment from the Netherlands is the third shipment intercepted with hatching eggs.

The shipment label identified the shipment as “Children’s Toys”, however an x-ray performed found 30 hatching eggs. Shipment of eggs is allowed, but do require an import permit. The eggs were seized due to the risk they may carry the Exotic Newcastle Disease.

If you have questions about your imports or want to be sure you have the right permits to import, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes fur coats for lack of documentation.

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Image of the seized furs, source: CBP.gov

U. S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers working seized a shipment of fur coats valued at $76,736. The fur coats were seized because they did not have the required documentation as required under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild Fauna and Flora. As the US is a party to CITES, the trade of items listed in CITES such as whale teeth, ivory, tortoise shell, reptile, fur skins, coral and birds all need to be authorized by a permit.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined the seized furs were garments from mink, fox, chinchilla and sable – species covered under CITES.

If you plan on shipping goods covered under CITES, contact experienced import attorney David Hsu before hand to ensure you are in compliance with the multitude of regulations enforced by CBP. David can be reached by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes Chinese tires for NHTSA violations.

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Image of sized tires. Source: cbp.gov

According to a CBP media release, CBP officers in Philadelphia seized tires for violating federal motor vehicle safety standards and regulations. Specifically, the tires were for trailer and mobile home applications and did not contain the mandatory markings that tell important safety information and use for customers. The tires also lacked brand identification that is needed in case a recall occurs.

The media release also further highlights CBP’s function of enforcing the rules and regulations of the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) in order to ensure the safety of the traveling public.

If you or anyone you know has had a Customs seizure for violations of any type or if you want to ensure your imports are in compliance with the alphabet soup of federal agencies and their endless rules and regulations; contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu by text/mobile at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Huawei files lawsuit against Commerce Department for seizing equipment.

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Photo by Field Engineer on Pexels.com

According to Reuters, Huawei Technologies Company, Inc. filed suit against the U.S. Department of Commerce on Friday the 21st claiming the seizure of telecommunications equipment sent from China to the US and back to China was not covered under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR).

Specifically, Huawei claims the equipment was not subject to a license requirement because it did not fit into a controlled category (ECCN) as the hardware was being returned to China from which it came.

The equipment seized is a computer server and ethernet switch sent to California for testing and then seized on the shipment back to China.

Will post more updates as they become available.

Louisville CBP Seizes Nearly $2.6 Million in Counterfeit Merchandise.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) media release on May 14th, officers seized a large shipment of counterfeit luxury watches, handbags, and sunglasses in Louisville. CBP estimates the manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) for the fake goods are worth an estimated $2.5 million if the goods were genuine.

The shipment contained counterfeit Rolex and Hublot watches, counterfeit Oakley sunglasses and Michael Kors handbags. Samples of the shipment were sent to CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise (CEE) where they were determined to be counterfeit.

The shipment contained 57 Rolex watches, 19 Oakley sunglasses, four Michael Kors handbags, and five Hublot watches, all determined to be counterfeit by CBP’s trade experts at the Centers of Excellence and Expertise. Last year, CBP estimates they seized $3.7 million worth of counterfeit products on a typical day.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs for suspected counterfeit or other intellectual property rights violations, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Unreported currency seizures up 62% over last year at Detroit field office.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP officers in the Detroit field office report an 62% increase in the seizure of unreported currency from international travelers.

As you are aware, all amounts of money, checks, currency (even foreign currency) totaling over $10,000 USD must be reported as you enter or leave the United States. Even if you are in the US temporarily on a layover, you must report this currency.

Back to the recent increase. Specifically, from October 1st to March 31st, CBP has seized over $3.8 million compared to $2.3 million during this same time frame in 2018.

If you have had your hard-earned currency seized, contact experienced customs money seizure attorney David Hsu at 832.896.6288 immediately, you have a certain time to respond so call anytime or email David at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes $7.8 million in fake luxury goods.

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Image of seized counterfeit Breitling watch. Source: CBP website.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection media release, CBP agents in Cincinnati seized approximately $7.8 million in counterfeit goods over a three day period in April. The counterfeit items included watches, apparel and other high end merchandise.

While the CBP media release did not specify the items, they did include the above photo of a counterfeit Bretiling watch. If you or someone you know has received a seizure notice by CBP for importation of counterfeit goods that violate intellectual property rights (IPR), contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for immeidate assistance and to discuss your options: by cell/text: 832.896.6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit Juul pods seized by CBP.

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Seized Juul pods. Source: US CBP

Earlier this week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Philadelphia reported a seizure of more than 1,152 counterfeit Juul pods, three chargers and a Juul device from overseas.

According to the CBP, the description of the item was “plastic pipe sample” from China. Upon inspection, CBP found 36 cartons of Juul pods suspected to be counterfeit.

Working with CBP’s Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise, officers verified the merchandise were counterfeits through the trademark holders.

CBP claims the merchandise has a MSRP of $4,700 if authentic. The rest of the media release reminds the public of the danger posed by unregulated manufacturing facilities that may result in products that are hazardous to the public.

If you or someone you know has had a customs seizure, contact experienced customs attorney David Hsu for information on how we may be able to get your goods released. Call or text 832-896-6288 or email attorney.dave@yahoo.com.