Russia trying to legalise blood diamonds from the CAR.

diamond

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

According to the Independent, Moscow claims the international ban is not working and seeks to end an international embargo on diamonds exported from the Central African Republic (CAR) since 2013. At the moment, the CAR is the only country in the world subject to a ban on “blood diamonds”.

The main reason Moscow wants to end the embargo on CAR diamonds is because 90% of the CAR’s diamonds are exported through the black market.

Blood diamonds refers to diamonds mined in a a war zone, and then sold to finance war activity.

Next year, Russia will chair the Kimberley Process, a UN program designed to stop diamond profits flowing to armed militias or used to fund war. Estimates put the Kimberley Process as high as 99.8% successful in stopping the global production of blood diamonds.

If you have any questions about the Kimberley Process and how it will effect your imports of diamonds to the US, contact experienced trade law attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Zimbabwe claims CBP’s accusation of use of forced labor in their diamond mine is a “shameless lie”.

photo of diamond ring

Photo by W W on Pexels.com

Earlier this week, I blogged about CBP’s issuance of a Withhold Release Order (WRO) that allows CBP to seize products produced “in whole or in part using forced labor”.

One of the products subject to detention are “Rough diamonds from the Marange Diamond Fields in Zimbabwe; mined from forced labor.

Earlier today, moneyweb.co.za (a Zimbabwe financial web publication) accused the US of lying about diamond mining at the Marange Diamond Fields using forced labor – calling the claim a “shameless lie”.

In support of their claim, the article cites the Kimberley Process (steps that are taken to ensure diamond mining isn’t used to fund conflicts) finding that there are no restrictions on trade in Zimbabwean diamonds. The Kimberley Process represents 81 countries and covers 99.8% of the global rough diamond production.

Zimbabwe’s deputy mines minister, Polite Kambamura is quoted as saying the “doors are open” if CBP wants to visit Marange and that “we are a responsible state miner that operates within the laws of the country and we observe strict adherence to critical tenets of corporate governance”.

Like Marange in Zimbabwe, if you feel your company has been wrongly placed on CBP’s WRO list, contact experienced customs and trade attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.