Louisville CBP seizes fake shoes, handbags and clothes.

Counterfeit goods seized, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Louisville seized a shipment described as “women’s clothes”. Upon further examination, CBP officers found designer shoes, handbags and clothes. Based off the appearance of the goods, a CBP import specialist examined the goods and determined 95 items were counterfeit and therefore seized. If authentic, the shipment from Vietnam destined to California was valued at $193,740.

If Customs has seized your goods and issued you a penalty notice for importing counterfeit goods, contact David Hsu for your options – call/text anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit and harmful pacifiers seized by CBP.

Counterfeit pacifier, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Pittsburgh seized a shipment of 25 pacifiers with counterfeit marks of luxury brands such as Chanel and Mercedez Benz. In addition to bearing a registered mark, counterfeit products may also be manufactured using inferior quality of materials – such as lead paint with excessive lead paint levels. The pacifiers were bejeweled – causing CBP to note the poor quality workmanship may result in loose pieces breaking off and potentially choking a child that may ingest the pieces. If authentic, the pacifiers have a MSRP of $1,300.00.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs and you want to discuss your seizure options, contact David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes more than $650k worth of fake Apple AirPods.

Image of seized counterfeit AirPod, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the LA/Long Beach seaport (one of the top 4 busiest US ports) seized over 2,400 pairs of counterfeit wireless earphones along with 14,220 charging cables. CBP estimates the value of the seized goods, if authentic to be worth $651,780. The goods were seized for violating Apple’s airpod and lightning registered trademarks (see image of a sample of the actual AirPods and cables seized).

If you have had your shipment seized for suspicion of violating trademarks, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com to discuss your options.

CBP agriculture specialists intercept moth egg mass.

Mass of egg moths, source: CBP.gov

Brownsville U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers intercept egg masses belonging to the Euproctis sp. (Erebidae) moth – a “first in port” of this pest. When initially discovered in late July, CBP agriculture specialists were unaware of the species and submitted a sample to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for identification.

The Euproctis sp. (Erebidae) months are found in Europe and Asia, it is believed the caterpillars are serious pests to agricultural crops and forests.

If your vessel has been seized by Customs or if you receive a notice of action for pests found on your shipment, contact invasive pests attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Counterfeit shoes seized in LAX.

Counterfeit Nike, source: CBP.gov

Another day, another seizure by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in LAX. The counterfeit shoes were from Hong Kong and labeled as “plastic ornaments”. Upon further examination, CBP officers found and seized 1,755 pairs of shoes with the Nike and Adidas branding.

Image of seized “Nike Air” shoes, source: cbp.gov

Customs then worked with import specialists at the Apparel, Footwear & Textiles Center of Excellence and Expertise (Apparel Center) to verify authenticity. As 100% of the time that occurs – the shoes were determined to be counterfeit and seized by Customs. CBP valued the seizure, if authentic, at $207,000.

If you have had your good seized by Customs, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Image of counterfeit Adidas – source: CBP.gov

New Orleans CBP seizes over $83k in counterfeit goods.

Image of seized goods, source: CBP.gov

Another day, another U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) counterfeit seizure. This time, officers in New Orleans seized more than $83K worth of counterfeit goods in early August.

The counterfeit goods include belts, wallets, backpacks, purses from brands such as Gucci, Hermes and Louis Vuitton. In addition, the shipment also contained 10 brush kits from the MAC brand.

CBP seized the goods under 19 USC 1526e for containing the counterfeit trademarks. If you or someone you know has had their shipment seized – contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288, or email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com to discuss your options.

Fake designer jewelry seized by CBP in San Juan.

“Piguet” watch, Source: CBP.gov

Another day, another U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) counterfeit seizure – this time in San Juan, Puerto Rico. According to the CBP media release, San Juan Field Operations seized counterfeit jewelry from a shipment originating out of Hong Kong. If genuine, Customs estimated the shipment to be worth approximately $1.2 million.

CBP did not mention the copied brands, but the photo attached to the media release was labeled “Piguet”, perhaps the name found on the watch to copy the “Piaget” brand.

Author’s comments – if the image of the watch attached to the media release is indicative of the products seized, it seems like this shipment probably was not trying to copy any actual luxury brands.

I don’t wear a watch – but looking at the Piaget watches sold online – I don’t see anything closely resembling what is shown in the attached photo. Most Piaget watches I see online look like a typical watchface with dials and easy to read numbers – much different than the “diamond” covered face of the seized watch. My guess is that a manufacturer in Shenzhen created their own brand of watches and needed a name, and therefore took the “Piaget” name and changed a few letters to “Piguet” (which appears more similar to the “Peugeot” car brand.

I understand that Customs is tasked with enforcing registered marks, word marks, trademarks etc., however, is this “Piguet” watch an attempt to counterfeit a real “Piaget” watch? Or is this an instance of a manufacturer taking a brand name, and changing it. I always think back to the old Simpsons episode where Homer buys a “SORNY” TV instead of a real “SONY”.

A quick search on Alibaba shows “Reebow” branded athletic equipment, and “Hommy Tilfiger” duffel bags next to “Carsonkangaroo” branded wallets under a logo silhouette of a kangaroo not closely resembling the Kangol logo.

I think it is arguable these shipments are not counterfeits – someone (not your author) aware of a high-end luxury brand such as Piaget would not confuse a watch branded “Piguet” with a real Piaget.

If you have had your goods seized by Customs, contact David Hsu anytime by phone/text at 832-896-6288. You can also find me on Line, WeChat, WhatsApp, Telegram by the same phone number – or email me at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, would be glad to evaluate your case for free.

CBP seizes $1.41 million in eyewear.

Counterfeit glasses, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Chicago seized seven shipments containing eyewear worth more than $1.41 million. The glasses were entered duty free claiming country of origin as Israel. However, upon further inspection, CBP officials found the origin markings on the eyeglasses did not match the country of origin on the paperwork.

CBP reports the country of origin on the goods included China, France, Italy and the United States. CBP seized the goods for fraudulently misrepresenting the country of origin and attempting to avoid the payment of duties. CBP seized the goods for violation of 19 USC 1304 and 19 USC 1595a(c).

If you have had your goods seized by customs for suspicion of being counterfeit, contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

$5.5 million in fake Gucci, Instagram and Facebook clothing seized.

Seized goods, source: CBP.gov

Earlier this past July, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at one of our great nation’s biggest seaport of Los Angeles / Long Beach seized a large shipment of women’s sleepwear containing counterfeit brands such as Gucci, Facebook and Instagram.

2020 is a weird year indeed when we consider Facebook and Instagram to be a luxury brand. If authentic the 16,340 items of seized counterfeit pajamas (called “sleeping dresses”) would be worth an approximate retail value of $5.5 million.

CBP reported the counterfeit goods were concealed inside generic non-branded pajamas which CBP believes was intentionally packaged to avoid detection.

Author’s note – yes, in general if you pack counterfeit goods underneath unbranded goods, or try to conceal a counterfeit logo (such as using black tape to cover a logo), CBP will assume you are aware of the nature of the goods and are attempting to smuggle them into the US in violation of 19 USC 1595a (c)(1)(A), in other words merchandise that “is stolen, smuggled, or clandestinely imported or introduced“.

In addition to violating intellectual property rights of the trademark holder, CBP also claims counterfeit goods may not be in compliance with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) requirements for flammability standards of sleepwear.

If you have had your shipment seized for alleged counterfeit violations or seized for alleged violations of CPSC consumer guidelines – contact seizure attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

CBP seizes Chinese shipment of human hair products due to suspected use of child and forced labor.

Image of the seized hair, source: CBP.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the Port of New York/Newark detained a shipment of products and accessories made with human hair today from Xinjiang, China.

The shipment was seized because of a pending “Withhold Release Order” (WRO) on hair products made by Lop County Meixin Hair Product Co. Ltd. The WRO came into effect on June 17th, in which Customs instructs each port to detain all products from certain manufacturers (in this case Lop County Meixin Hair Product Co. Ltd.). The 13 tons of seized products were worth over $800k dollars. WRO’s are typically issued if Customs reasonably believes goods are manufactured using prison labor, forced labor, made under use of excessive overtime, withholding of wages and or the restriction of movement. CBP seizes Chinese shipment of human hair products due to suspected use of child and forced labor.t. Prior to a WRO being issued, CBP will give the importer the burden of proof to show the merchandise is not manufactured using forced labor or any of the other issues previously written above.

If you are subject to a WRO, or if you are under audit for a potential WRO action – contact trade and customs attorney David Hsu immediately by mobile phone at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com.