Trump administration eases regulations on exportation of small arms and ammunition.

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The Trump administration issued new rules related to the export licensing of firearms and ammunition products. Firearms and ammunition exports will now be managed by the Commerce Department and not the State Department.

In other words, small arms and ammunition shifts from the Department of State’s International Traffic in Arm’s Regulations US Munitions List to the US Department of Commerce’s Export Administration regulations.

ITAR concerns defense-related exports whereas EAR is “dual use” for commercial or military use, and therefore less strict export rules versus the State Department.

The new Trump administration rules also eliminates the $2,250 registration fee for gunsmiths and small companies who do not manufacture, or export firearms or ammunition.

The final rule will be published on January 23 rd and implemented 45 days later after formal publication.

If you have any questions how these new rules will impact your small arms or ammunition export business, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

FedEx sues Commerce Department.

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On Monday June 24th, FedEx filed a lawsuit against the the U.S. Department of Commerce to avoid having to follow the BIS entity list restrictions the government imposed back in May against doing business with Huawei.

A FedEx statement said “FedEx is a transportation company, not a law enforcement agency,” and that the EAR violates a shipping company’s rights to due process under the Fifth Amendment because all shipping companies are strictly liable for shipments that violate the Export Administration Regulations; without requiring evidence the shippers had knowledge of any violations.

In short, FedEx claims compliance with the new EAR regulations is impossible because FedEx cannot know the origin and technological make-up of all the contents of the shipments it handles.

Will post updates as soon as they are available.

American Farm Bureau Federation supports Commerce Department anti-dumping investigation of Mexican tomatoes.

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The U.S. Department of Commerce will resume anti-dumping investigations into imports of Mexican tomatoes despite a previous agreement not to.

Zippy Duvall, President of the American Farm Bureau Federation indicated an anti-dumping investigation was needed because Mexican producers have increased their market share despite an agreement to ban artificially low prices.

On February 6, 2019, the Department of Commerce notified Mexico they would withdraw from the 2013 Suspension Agreement on Fresh Tomatoes from Mexico under a clause that the signatories may withdraw from the Agreement with “ninety days written notice to the other party”. The expiration of the 90-days is May 7, 2019.

After the withdraw on May 8th, an investigation by the Department of Commerce will continue and will send notification to the International Trade Commission of its final determination.

If you are an importer of Mexican tomatoes or want to know how this may impact you, contact antidumping duty attorney David Hsu at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or by phone/text at 832.896.6288 for a no cost or obligation consultation.