CBP seizes unsafe toy ducks.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), CBP officers at the Georgia seaport seized 5,000 stuffed toy ducks after tests found the ducks contained excessive amounts of lead.

The container arrived from Hong Kong and was labeled in boxes labeled “Doctor Duck”. The toys were detained and a sample was shipped to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) for testing.
Test results found the toys contained excess levels of lead and cannot be entered into the US, meaning the next step for CBP will be to destroy the over $100,000 worth of toys.
If your shipment has been seized for excessive lead paint, contact David Hsu for a no cost consultation at 832-896-6288 or by email to attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Children’s toys containing lead seized by CBP.

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Image of seized toys containing lead, source: CBP.gov

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized 190 toy finger puppets after it was determined that they contained excessive amounts of lead. The article does not specify the country of origin, but does say the shipment originated from Ottawa, Ontario and destined for a distribution center in the US.

CBP officers detained the shipment of toys to examine whether the toys contained lead in the paint. With the involvement of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), they determined the toys were contaminated with lead. As a result, the finger puppets will be destroyed by CBP.

If you have had a shipment seized by Customs, contact experienced seizure attorney David Hsu for immediate help by cell/text at 832-896-6288, or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

CBP seizes goods for lead in paint.

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Image of seized brushes, source: cbp.gov

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Baltimore seized 790 children’s hair brushes from China. The children’s folding hair brushes contained a mirror and were included in a shipment which included “hats, gloves, hookah”. A sample of the shipment was sent to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to conduct a chemical analysis.

The CPSC advised CBP that the brushes contained excessive lead levels – more than 2,500 parts per million. In general, all children’s products made or imported into the US must not contain more than 100 parts per million of total lead content in “accessible parts”.

The appraised value of the seized goods carry a suggested retail price (MSRP) of $5,522. As the lead content is hazardous to children, the brushes will be destroyed by CBP.

While America took had the lead paint abatement initiative starting in the 70’s, the rest of the world is yet to fully rid the use of lead in many paints. Excessive amounts of lead are harmful to children if the accessible parts are placed in their mouths. Lead in paint causes illness and excessive levels further damage the a child’s development.

If you have any import/export questions, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.