UK planning to remove Huawei equipment from its 5G networks.

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According to a Financial Times article, the UK is going to remove Huawei from their 5G network and make efforts to remove all Huawei components in the next 3 years. The move by the UK should be welcome news for the US, as Trump administration officials have been pressuring the UK to not use Huawei for their 5G network.

The US has argued that Huawei could build backdoors into network infrastructure and assist in spying efforts by the Chinese government. In the past, the US threatened intelligence efforts between the two countries could be limited if the UK does proceed with the Huawei 5G network.

The recent news developments shifts away from previous UK policy limiting how much Huawei equipment could be used in the 5G networks. Yesterday’s announcement signals a significant shift away.

Other online sources reporting the news also claim the UK response is partially due to public sentiment about China and their handling of the corona virus pandemic.

If your company exports to Huawei and have any questions about compliance with the changing export rules, contact David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Department of Commerce amends direct product rule to restrict Huawei’s use of US technology and software.

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Yesterday, May 15, 2020, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced plans to restrict Huawei’s use of U.S. technology and software to design and manufacture its semiconductors abroad by amending the foreign-produced direct product rule. This change to the rule was established to counter Huawei’s acquisition of semiconductors that are the direct product of certain software and technology from the US.

While BIS added Huawei and its affiliates to the Entity List in 2019 and therefore requiring US companies wishing to export items to Huawei required the companies to obtain a license. Despite being placed on the Entity List, Huawei continued to use software and technology from the US to design semiconductors, there by getting around the basis for placement on the Entity List. Specifically, Huawei would use semiconductor fabrication facilities overseas that incorporated U.S. equipment.

The rule changes specifically mention Huawei and are written to close the loophole. The full announcement and full text of the rule changes can be found at the Department of Commerce website here.

If you have questions how the changes may impact your company, contact export compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

New rules on exports to China, effective June 29, 2020.

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Yesterday, the Federal Register published new guidelines by the Bureau of Industry and Security governing the export, reexport and transfer of goods to the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) is amending the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to expand license requirements on exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country) of items intended for military end use or military end users in the People’s Republic of China (China).

The first major change will require U.S. companies to obtain a license before selling certain items in China that can support the military, even if the products are for civilian use. Previously, a loophole allowed an exception for civilian technology to be exported with a license.

The new regulations will impact several industries in the US, such as the semiconductor industry.

The second major change will require U.S. companies to file declarations for all exports to China, regardless of value.

A third proposed rule change will require foreign companies shipping American goods to China to seek approval from the US prior to export.

There will be a brief comment period to collect information on the proposed changes.

If you would like to submit a comment, or if you would like an evaluation of your company’s export (and import) compliance program, or have any trade questions – contact experienced trade law attorney David Hsu by phone/text at anytime: 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com

Trump administration eases regulations on exportation of small arms and ammunition.

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The Trump administration issued new rules related to the export licensing of firearms and ammunition products. Firearms and ammunition exports will now be managed by the Commerce Department and not the State Department.

In other words, small arms and ammunition shifts from the Department of State’s International Traffic in Arm’s Regulations US Munitions List to the US Department of Commerce’s Export Administration regulations.

ITAR concerns defense-related exports whereas EAR is “dual use” for commercial or military use, and therefore less strict export rules versus the State Department.

The new Trump administration rules also eliminates the $2,250 registration fee for gunsmiths and small companies who do not manufacture, or export firearms or ammunition.

The final rule will be published on January 23 rd and implemented 45 days later after formal publication.

If you have any questions how these new rules will impact your small arms or ammunition export business, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at attorney.dave@yahoo.com or dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Huawei claims they are victims of 1 million cyber attacks daily.

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According to a Forbes.com article, the Huawei security chief, John Suffolk claims Huawei is cyber attacked almost 1 million times per day on the Huawei networks and computers. According to their security chief, most of the attacks are looking for intellectual property theft as Huawei leads the world in 5G technology. In response to these attacks, Huawei has pledged to work with their customers to secure their defenses from further cyber attacks.
On the other hand, the US government has alleged that Huawei receives Chinese state support and as such is subject to assisting Beijing with intelligence gathering overseas through backdoors in their hardware.
The US is not alone in its suspicion, the Forbes article also cites a EU report warning of the “combination of new technologies and 5G networks risks hostile state control of critical infrastructure, logistics, transportation even law enforcement”. The EU report did not cite China or Huawei but the article did indicate that 5G suppliers from countries “with poor democratic standards,” for which the reference to Huawei and China was clear.
If you do business with Huawei and have questions about maintaining Huawei compliance, contact export compliance attorney David Hsu by phone/text at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

Newest Huawei P30 smartphone ships with Google Android 10.

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Despite a current ban on US companies from supplying technology to Huawei, the new P30 Pro features a 6.47 inch display, 4 cameras and Google’s  Android 10 (Android 9 “Pie”was the last Android version to be released with a name associated with a confectionary food).
While Google was exempt from export restrictions imposed against Huawei and the supplying of software for new products. Future Huawei smartphones such as the 5G Mate 30 Pro may include the Huawei developed Harmony OS.
If your company does business with Huawei and you want to be sure you are in compliance, contact experienced trade attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

China General Nuclear Power Group added to BIS entity list.

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This past Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Commerce added China General Nuclear Power Group (CGN) to the BIS entity list. As a result, American companies are now prevented from selling any products to China’s largest state-owned nuclear company. If any American company or person does business with CGN (or any other listed entity), they would be violating the law and subject to persecution.

The U.S. Department of Commerce claims CGN its subsidiaries engaged in activity to acquire advanced U.S. nuclear technology and material for use in the Chinese military.

China claims the real goal of placing CGN on the entity list is to limit China’s growth under China’s “Made in China 2025” initiative. Made in China 2025 is an effort by the Chinese government to increase the high tech capability and manufacturing of China. If successful, the “Made in China 2025” efforts will make China the a superpower in high technology in Asia.

If you have any questions about your company’s operations and want to ensure compliance with the new entity list addition, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

US Companies can no longer do business with Huawei on August 19th.

In May, the Trump administration placed Huawei on the BIS entity list – a list of foreign organizations with whom U.S. companies are restricted from doing business with due to national security concerns. The Trump administration believes the Chinese government has influence over Huawei and that certain Huawei equipment and technology may allow the Chinese government to spy using the Huawei equipment – especially the planned 5G equipment Huawei has developed.

Even though Huawei is on the BIS entity list, the Trump administration issued a 90-day exemption to the ban, allowing U.S. companies to sell certain products and services to Huawei. However, this 90-day exemption will end on Monday, August 19th.

It is unknown whether the U.S. government will issued another extension. Given the current situation in Hong Kong and the lack of progress on US/China trade talks, the Trump administration will likely not grant another extension.

Will post any additional Huawei news as it becomes available. If you have any questions or concerns about whether your business can continue business with Huawei, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.

Intel has begun selling to Huawei as US loosens restrictions.

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Since the US eased restrictions on supplying components to Huawei, the largest US chimpaker, Intel, said they have begun selling products to Huawei “within the rules of the law”. Additionally, Intel says they are also requesting an export license to sell “general purpose computing” chips to Huawei that do not pose a national security risk.

As you are aware, the Trump administration raised concerns regarding the use of Huawei technology may contain backdoors that would allow the Chinese government to spy on users, posing a national security risk. As a result, the US Department of Commerce added Huawei to their entity list this past May. Inclusion on the entity list precluded Huawei from buying parts and components from American companies without US government approval (an export license).

However, after the Trump met with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 summit last month, President Trump said that US firms can resume selling equipment to Huawei.

Additionally, earlier in July, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced an easing of restrictions against the Chinese company in line with Trump’s statements after the G20 summit, stating that the US would issue licenses to US companies looking to sell to Huawei as long as the sales do not pose a threat to national security. An export license would still be required as Huawei has not been removed from the entity list.

If you have any questions whether your company can continue to do business with Huawei, contact experienced export compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at attorney.dave@yahoo.com, dh@gjatradelaw.com.

GitHub blocks developers in countries facing US trade sanctions.

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GitHub (owned by Microsoft) is the world’s largest software development platform that provides hosting for software development version control using Git. It was acquired by Microsoft in 2018 for $7.5 billion and has recently started blocking developers in countries facing US trade sanctions.

For example, last week Github restricted the account of Anatoliy Kashkin, a 21-year-old Russian citizen who lives in Crimea. He was told his GitHub account had been restricted “due to US trade controls”.

The correspondence from GitHub advised Kashkin of GitHub’s US trade control policy – listing Crimea, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, and Syria as countries facing US sanctions. In addition to his website now showing a 404 error, Kashkin also can’t access his previous work.

GitHub’s website does advise that “Users are responsible for ensuring that the content they develop and share on GitHub.com complies with the U.S. export control laws, including the EAR (Export Administration Regulations) and the US International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR)” and that “The cloud-hosted service offering available at Github.com has not been designed to host data subject to the ITAR and does not currently offer the ability to restrict repository access by country. If you are looking to collaborate on ITAR- or other export-controlled data, we recommend you consider GitHub Enterprise Server, GitHub’s on-premises offering.”

Besides banning accounts for individuals in Crimea, GitHub has also restricted developers in Iran.

If you want to ensure your company is in compliance with the Export Administration Regulations and the US International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), contact experienced compliance attorney David Hsu at 832-896-6288 or by email at dh@gjatradelaw.com, attorney.dave@yahoo.com.